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TX bankruptcy lawyer, Texas chapter 13 lawyer, Texas chapter 7 lawyer, For most people, filing for bankruptcy is a last resort. It can be easy to dig yourself into a pit of debt that you are unable to climb out of. Once the bills start becoming due, it can feel like an ocean wave washing over you, with you struggling to stay above water. Not paying your bills can cause creditors to resort to collections actions, such as wage garnishment and repossession. Once you file for bankruptcy, however, all of those collections actions must stop. This is what is known as the automatic stay.

Understanding the Automatic Stay

The automatic stay is a provision in the U.S. Bankruptcy Code that temporarily halts collections attempts from all creditors. The automatic stay goes into effect immediately after you file for bankruptcy and prevents any and all creditors from contacting you about debts you may have with them. The automatic stay does not last forever. As soon as your bankruptcy case is finished, the automatic stay is lifted.

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TX bankrupcty lawyers, TX chapter 7 lawyersBeing in debt can feel like you are drowning, especially if you are so far into debt that you do not see a way out. Whatever the reason for the extreme amount of debt, there are options that you can consider to help with the debt. For many people, bankruptcy can be the right option to relieve them of most, or even all of their debt. However, filing for bankruptcy is not easy and can actually be quite complicated and confusing. Each bankruptcy case is different, so it is not always simple for you to know what to expect after you declare bankruptcy. Here are a few things you should know if you are considering filing for bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy Does Not Happen Overnight

Some people think of bankruptcy as being similar to small claims court where you usually receive your disposition the same day you attend court. This is not the case. The bankruptcy process is complex and typically lasts at least a few months if you file for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. If you file for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the case is open and ongoing for three to five years, the duration of your repayment plan.

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chapter 13 bankruptcy attorney, TX chapter 13 lawyerFor many people, filing for bankruptcy is a fresh start in life. If you have filed for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you are still technically paying off your debts, just in a manner that is more manageable for you. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy consolidates all of your debt and creates a repayment plan that lasts for three to five years, depending on your situation. Your monthly payment amount is more than just taking the amount of debt to be repaid and dividing by the number of months you are required to pay. The amount that you are ordered to pay each month is the result of a formula that takes into account your income, assets, debts, and expenses. For some people, this number is a manageable payment. For others, it can be a burden or become one because of a variety of situations.

Qualifying for a Modification

Not everyone can qualify to get their Chapter 13 repayment plan modified. The courts will not entertain a request to modify your plan just because -- you have to have a legitimate reason/need for the modification. The most common reason modifications are granted to Chapter 13 repayment plans is because of changed circumstances. These circumstances must be significant enough to severely limit your ability to meet the terms of your current repayment plan. Examples of a significant change in circumstances include:

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trusteeThe most common types of bankruptcies that are filed in the United States are Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies. There are many differences between a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, mainly in the way that the debts are handled. While these two types of bankruptcies differ greatly in many aspects, they do have one thing in common -- they both utilize a bankruptcy trustee.

If you have thought about getting a bankruptcy or you have done research about getting one, you have probably come across the term -- but do you know what a bankruptcy trustee is? It is important to understand the role of the trustee if you are getting a bankruptcy or considering one.

What Is a Bankruptcy Trustee?

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Texas bankruptcy lawyer, TX chapter 7 attorney, A bankruptcy can help by allowing you to discharge your debts and no longer be legally responsible for repaying those debts, giving you the chance to start over. This blank slate comes with a price, however. Filing for bankruptcy will affect your credit score and can make it harder to get future loans or credit cards. Nevertheless, for many people who are in financial trouble, there is no other way to remedy the situation but to file for bankruptcy. There are two types of bankruptcies that are commonly filed by individuals in the United States -- Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Each type of bankruptcy has its own way of helping those who are in insurmountable debt, with Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharging most or all of your debts and Chapter 13 reorganizing your debts into more manageable monthly payments. Qualification requirements also vary depending on the type of bankruptcy you choose to go with.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

The idea behind a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is that you do not have enough income to repay all of the debts that you owe. As such, most of your debts are discharged in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. In 2005, bankruptcy laws changed to add income limits to qualify for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The past six months of your income will be used to determine whether or not you qualify for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy along with the number of people in your household. Generally, the income limits are as follows:

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