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Bankruptcy Writes Off (Some) Income Taxes

March 4th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy permanently writes off income taxes, as long as the tax meets certain conditions. For some taxes the conditions are easy to meet. 

 

Bankruptcy DOES Write Off Income Taxes

There are certain very special debts that bankruptcy never writes off. Child and spousal support is a good example. See Sections 523(a)(5) and 101(14A) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Income taxes are different. Income taxes CAN be written off, as long as you meet a few conditions. These conditions mostly tie in to timing—when the tax was due and when (and whether) you filed its tax return.

The Two Timing Conditions

In most people meeting these conditions is straightforward. You essentially have to file your tax returns and wait long enough to comply with for the following two conditions:

  1. You submitted the pertinent tax return to the IRS/state and did so more than 2 years before filing your bankruptcy case. Section 523(a)(1)(B)(ii) of the Bankruptcy Code.
  2. The legal due date for that tax return was more than 3 years before filing your bankruptcy case. Section 507(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code.

For example, assume you owe the IRS $5,000 for the 2014 tax year, and you submitted its tax return a full year late—in April 2016. It’s been more than 2 years since that so you meet the first condition. The legal due date for that tax return was in April 2015, which is more than 3 years ago. So you also meet the second condition. So in most situations bankruptcy would write off that 2014 income tax debt of $5,000.

A Few Important Twists about the Timing

Keep three practical considerations in mind about these two time periods:

  1. The 3-year period only starts to run when the tax return was “last due, including extensions.” Section 523(a)(1)(B)(ii). The 3 years only begins at the extended due date. It’s absolutely crucial that your bankruptcy lawyer gets the correct information from you about whether you got an extension that year.
  2. If you’re cutting it close (because you’re in a big hurry to file), the precise tax return due date can be crucial. Remember that taxes are not always due on April 15 and October 15 (for extensions). Weekends and holidays can push the due date out even several days. That means you may have to wait some extra days to file your bankruptcy case to be able to write off that tax debt.
  3. Careful about making a mistake about whether and when you actually submitted your tax return. It may be worth finding out directly from the IRS/state to avoid getting a rude surprise after filing your bankruptcy case.

Other Uncommon Conditions

There are two other conditions that might possibly apply, in more complicated situations.

  1. More than 240 days must pass from when the IRS/state assessed the income tax to when filing your bankruptcy case. Assessment usually happens within a few weeks after you get your tax returns in to the IRS/state. So usually this condition is easily met. It only tends to apply if assessment gets delayed with a tax audit, litigation in Tax Court, a tax appeal, offer in compromise, and other complications.
  2. Regardless of all these timing rules, you can never write off an income tax based on a fraudulent tax return or if you intentionally evade a tax. This is uncommon. It tends to only come up if you were significantly dishonest with the tax authorities.

Conclusion

In most situations you can write off the tax if you filed your pertinent tax return and both the 2-year and 3-year periods have passed. But the intersection between bankruptcy and income taxes is definitely complicated. Be sure to see a competent bankruptcy lawyer if you owe taxes so that you get the full benefit of the law.

 

Filing Chapter 13 in 2019 to Write Off More Income Taxes

January 14th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 is a riskier, longer, and maybe more expensive way to escape a dischargeable income tax debt—but may still be your best option. 


Last week we showed how to permanently write off (“discharge”) more of your tax debts through Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” Today we show how to do this with Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”

Why Use Chapter 13 If Chapter 7 is Faster and Cleaner?

Chapter 7 is a very fast way to discharge an income tax debt that qualifies for discharge. You would very likely no longer owe the tax only about 4 months after filing a Chapter 7 case.

But Chapter 13 case could be much better for you than Chapter 7 for other reasons. Those other reasons may outweigh the benefit of discharging your dischargeable tax debt quickly.

You may owe some other income tax debt(s) which do not meet the conditions for discharge. These other taxes that may be too large to pay off reasonably through a monthly payment plan with the IRS/state.  The other taxes may not qualify for an Offer in Compromise or other settlement. You may well save money and avoid significant risks by handling all of your taxes in a Chapter 13 case.

There are also many other reasons that Chapter 13 would be worthwhile for you, reasons not involving income taxes. It may save your home from foreclosure or your vehicle(s) from repossession. Chapter 13 can deal with a child or spousal support arrearage much better than Chapter 7. There are many other situations where Chapter 13 gives you extraordinary and unique powers. So it can be worthwhile overall in spite of its disadvantages in dealing with a dischargeable tax debt.

How Does Chapter 13 Deal with Dischargeable Income Taxes?

Determining whether a particular income tax debt can be discharged in Chapter 13 is the same as in Chapter 7. Please see our last blog post for the conditions of discharge. These conditions mostly involve how long it’s been since the tax return for the tax at issue was due and when the return was actually submitted to the IRS/state. Sometimes there are other pertinent conditions, but usually it’s just a matter of timing.

Because of how the timing works, there are certain points of time in 2019 when a tax that hadn’t earlier qualified for discharge would then qualify. Again, see our last blog post about those crucial times happening this year.

If your tax does meet the conditions for discharge, it can get discharged in your Chapter 13 case. But this works quite differently than under Chapter 7.

One key difference is that under Chapter 13 there’s a good chance that you would pay something on your dischargeable tax debt.

Under Chapter 13 dischargeable income tax debts is treated like the rest of your “general unsecured” debts. Under your payment plan all such debts get paid the same percentage of their total amounts. That percentage may be any amount from 0% to 100% of their amount, depending on your budget and other factors.

Consider two situations: First, if you have a “0% plan” then you’d pay nothing on the dischargeable tax just like in a straightforward Chapter 7 case. Second, even if you do pay some percentage, often that actually doesn’t increase the amount you pay into your payment. We’ll explain these two situations.

A 0% Payment Plan

In some Chapter 13 cases all the money that the debtor can afford to pay goes to special creditors. All the money going into the Chapter 13 payment plan goes either to secured or to “priority” debts. These would include home mortgages, vehicle loans, nondischargeable taxes, child and spousal support, and such. These usually have to be paid in full before the “general unsecured” debts receive anything.  So during the 3-to-5-year payment plan no money goes to the dischargeable income taxes. That’s a 0% Chapter 13 plan.

Assuming the bankruptcy approves the plan, and you successfully complete it, at its conclusion the dischargeable taxes get discharged, without you having to pay any of it.

Payment Plans Which Do Not Increase the Amount You Pay

In many Chapter 13 plans the amount available for the pool of the “general unsecured” debts is a fixed amount. That amount is based on what you can afford to pay over the required length of the plan. (That required length is usually 3 or 5 years.) That fixed amount does not change regardless how much in “general unsecured” debts you owe. The amount just gets distributed to all those debts pro rata. The more you owe in “general unsecured” debts the lower the percent of the debts that fixed amount can pay.

For example, assume you can afford to pay the pool of “general unsecured” debts a total of $2,000 during the course of the payment plan. All the rest of the money you pay into the plan is earmarked for secured and “priority” debts. Assume also that you have $20,000 in unsecured credit card and medical debts and $5,000 of dischargeable income tax. Without the income tax, the $2,000 would be paid towards the $20,000 in “general unsecured” debts, resulting in a 10% plan. ($2,000 is 10% of $20,000.) Now when you add in the $5,000 tax, there’s a total of $25,000 of “general unsecured” debt. $2,000 is 8% of $25,000, resulting in an 8% plan.

You would be paying no more—the fixed amount of $2,000—over the length of your plan. The fact that you owe the $5,000 in dischargeable tax would not increase the amount you would pay. Then at the successful completion of the case all remaining “general unsecured” debts, including whatever was remaining on the dischargeable tax, would be forever discharged.

Conclusion

So you see that Chapter 13 is a slower and somewhat riskier way to discharge an income tax debt. Plus you may have to pay a portion of the tax instead of quickly discharging all of it under Chapter 7. But then again you may not have to pay anything on it, as described above. In any event, the delay and risks may well be worthwhile. Your bankruptcy lawyer will help you weigh all the advantages and disadvantages so that you can make the right choice.

 

Timing: Writing Off Income Taxes

September 22nd, 2017 at 7:00 am

Usually you can discharge—write off—an income tax debt by just waiting long enough. Here’s how to discharge a tax debt under Chapter 7.  

 

Timing is Just About Everything

If you owe an income tax debt and file a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case, one of two things will happen to that debt:

  1. It will be discharged—permanently written off—just like any medical bill or other ordinary debt, or else
  2. Nothing will happen to that tax debt; you’ll continue to owe it as if you hadn’t filed bankruptcy.

The difference, most of the time, is timing—when you file your Chapter 7 case.

The Timing Rules

In most situations a Chapter 7 case will discharge an income tax debt if you meet two timing conditions. The date you and your bankruptcy lawyer file that case must be both:

  1. at least 3 years after the tax return for that tax was due, and
  2. at least 2 years after that tax return was actually submitted to the IRS or state tax authority.  

See Sections 507(a)(8)(A)(i) and 523(a)(1)(B) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

One important twist: IF you got an extension to file the applicable tax return, then the above 3-year waiting period doesn’t begin until the end of the extension. Section 507(a)(8)(A)(i). For example, let’s say you got a 6-month extension from April 15 to October 15 of the pertinent year. So then the 3-year period starts on that October 15 instead of on the usual April 15 return filing due date.

These Rules Applied

Assume you owe $7,500 in income taxes for the 2013 tax year. You’d asked for a 6-month extension to October 15, 2014. But then you didn’t actually submit the tax return until December 31, 2014.  

If you’d file a Chapter 7 case at any point before October 15, 2017, you’d continue owing the $7,500 tax. If you’d file on or after October 15 you would likely not owe a dime.

That’s because on October 15, 2017:

  1. At least 3 years would have passed since the extended due date of October 15, 2014, and ALSO
  2. At least 2 years would have passed since actually submitting the tax return on December 31, 2014.

Or, take with same $7,500 tax debt for the 2013 tax year with similar facts but a couple differences. You didn’t ask for an extension, but also didn’t submit the tax return until December 31, 2015.

Under these facts you’d have to wait until after December 31, 2017 to file the Chapter 7 case.

That’s because:

  1. 3 years since the tax return was due—on April 15, 2014—would have passed on April  15, 2017, but
  2. 2 years from the day the return was actually submitted would not pass until December 31, 2017.

Other Conditions

Earlier we said that “in most situations” Chapter 7 discharges income taxes debt when you meet the two timing conditions. So what are the other situations when taxes would not be discharged, even after meeting the 2-year and 3-year conditions?

There are two sets of them.

The first set comes into play if you made an “offer in compromise” to the IRS or state to settle the debt, or if you had filed a prior bankruptcy case involving this same tax debt. Since these are unusual situations, and the rules are detailed, talk with your bankruptcy lawyer if they apply to you.

The second set applies in situations in which the taxpayer “made a fraudulent return or willfully attempted in any manner to evade or defeat such tax.” Section 523(a)(1)(C).  Different bankruptcy judges interpret this language differently. For example, is it a willful attempt to evade a tax to merely not submit its tax return when due, even if you submitted it voluntarily a year later? How about if you didn’t submit the tax return until the IRS personally contacted you to do so? Again, talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about how this part of the Bankruptcy Code is interpreted by your court. 

 

Income Taxes Discharged and Not Discharged in Bankruptcy

April 15th, 2016 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy DOES discharge–permanently write off–certain income taxes. It’s mostly just a matter of time.  

 

 

Taxes Can Be Discharged (Legally Written Off)

Some special kinds of debts can never be discharged through bankruptcy. Examples are child and spousal support, and criminal fines and restitution. A bankruptcy filing does not write off these kinds of debts.

Income taxes are not like these. Almost all income taxes can be discharged, once a few conditions have been met.

Once the tax you owe meets those conditions, it is discharged exactly like any other debt. The IRS and your state taxing authority are no different than your credit card creditor. Once a tax debt is discharged, they can never chase you for that debt again.

The Two Main Conditions to Discharge Income Taxes

For most people the conditions are not complicated. They require filing your tax returns and waiting out a certain amount of time.

To discharge an income tax in bankruptcy, BOTH:

  • More than 2 years must have passed between the date that you submitted the pertinent tax return to the IRS or state tax agency and the date you file your bankruptcy case.
  • More than 3 years must have passed between the legal due date for that tax return and the date you file your bankruptcy case.

That’s usually all it takes: filing the tax return and waiting for these two-year and three-year deadlines to pass before filing bankruptcy.

A Few Cautions

Keep three practical considerations in mind about these two time periods:

  • The 3-year period starts to run when the tax return was “last due, including extensions.” So if you asked for (and got) an extension of time to send in the tax return—from April 15 to October 15, usually—the three-year period does not begin until the extended due date for filing the tax.
  • You need to be precise about the actual date the tax return was due for the tax year in question. For example, this year April 15 falls on a Friday but that’s also a holiday in Washington D.C., so tax returns are not actually due until Monday, April 18. A couple days may seem minor but can make all the difference between a tax debt being completely discharged and being still fully owed.
  • With the 2-years-since-tax-returns-filed condition, be sure to determine accurately whether and when the IRS/state actually received your tax returns. Unless you already have documented proof of that date, get that directly from the IRS/state to make sure.

Two Other Conditions that Seldom Apply

Most of the time, your tax debt is discharged if those two conditions are met. But there are two conditions that could possibly come into play for some people.

  • More than 240 days must have passed between the date that the tax was assessed by the IRS/state and the date you file your bankruptcy case. This is seldom an issue because assessment usually happens within a few weeks after you get your tax returns in to the IRS/state. So you automatically meet this 240-day condition when you meet the 2-year and 3-year ones. It only comes into play when assessment gets delayed with a tax audit, litigation in Tax Court, a tax appeal, offer in compromise, and similar complications.
  • If you file a fraudulent tax return or intentionally evade a tax, it cannot be discharged in bankruptcy. This is relatively rare. It arises only if you were materially dishonest on your tax return, by not including some of your income, or by intentionally claiming deductions or credits which you knew you were not entitled to, or by cheating the IRS/state in some other way.

Conclusion

Assuming that these last two conditions don’t apply to you, and you filed your tax return for the tax in question, that tax can be discharged once the 2-year and 3-year periods have expired.

For example, assume you owe $7,500 for 2012 income taxes, for which you submitted your tax return for that tax on the regular due date of April 15, 2013. Assume the tax was assessed as usual way back in 2013, and there’s no tax fraud involved. You met the 2-year condition as of April 16, 2015. You meet the 3-year condition by filing your bankruptcy case on or after April 16, 2016. That bankruptcy case would discharge the $7,500 income tax debt and it would be permanently out of your life.

 

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