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Archive for the ‘vehicle reaffirmation’ tag

Keep Your Vehicle through Cramdown

May 13th, 2019 at 7:00 am

If you can’t afford to pay your vehicle payments even after writing off your other debts under Chapter 7, consider a Chapter 13 loan cramdown. 

 

The last two blog posts have been about keeping your vehicle in a Chapter 7 case. Two weeks ago was about the benefits of reaffirming the vehicle’s loan. Last week was about possible ways of keeping the vehicle by making the loan payments but not reaffirming. These all assumed that you would keep on making the full monthly payments in order to keep the vehicle.

But what if you can’t afford the full monthly payments? Are there any other options if, even after getting rid of your other debt, you can’t pay the vehicle payments?

The answer: you may be able to reduce the vehicle payments through Chapter 13 cramdown. In fact, you may be able to significantly reduce the payments. And cramdown may give you some other huge financial benefits.

Reducing Monthly Payments through Cramdown

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is very different from Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” It takes much longer but Chapter 13 comes with some significant advantages. This includes the possible cramdown of your vehicle loan.

Under Chapter 13 you and your bankruptcy lawyer come up with a court-approved payment plan. That plan just about always significantly reduces what you pay monthly towards your debts. And if you successfully complete the plan you usually pay significantly less overall towards your debts.

Similarly, under cramdown you can often reduce both your monthly payment and the total you pay on your vehicle loan.

How Does Cramdown Work?

Your Chapter 13 payment plan treats secured debts and unsecured debts very differently. In general, secured debts need to be paid in full if you want to keep whatever the debt is securing. Unsecured debts usually only need to be paid as much as there’s money available to pay them.

So what if a secured debt—such as a vehicle loan—is only partially secured? That happens if the vehicle is worth less than the balance owed on the loan. The secured part of the loan is the amount equal to the value of the vehicle. The unsecured part is the rest of the loan balance—the part that effectively has nothing securing it.

Here’s a simple example. Let’s say you’d been paying for 3 years on a vehicle loan, you now still owe $15,000 but the vehicle is worth only $9,000. The secured portion of that vehicle loan is $9,000 and the unsecured portion is $6,000.

Recalculating the Payment Amount

Cramdown re-writes your vehicle loan so that your monthly payment gets calculated on only the secured part of the loan. In our example, your monthly payment now pays down only the $9,000 secured debt instead of the full $15,000 balance. Since the secured amount is less than the full loan balance, the new monthly payments are usually less.

The monthly payment is also reduced when those payments are stretched out over a longer period. They can extend as long as your Chapter 13 payment plan lasts, which is usually 3 to 5 years.

In addition, cramdown sometimes lowers the vehicle loan’s interest rate. That helps if your contract interest rate is high.

Combining all this, cramdown reduces your monthly payment by reducing the total amount it is paying off (the secured part of the loan), sometimes stretching the payment term out over a longer period, and often reducing the interest rate.

As a result, it’s not unusual for monthly payments to be chopped in half, or even better. It all depends on the details of your vehicle loan and on your finances going forward.  

What Happens to the Unsecured Part?

In our example, what happens under Chapter 13 cramdown to the remaining $6,000 unsecured part of the vehicle loan?

It’s lumped in with and treated just like your other “general unsecured” debts. Most of the time a Chapter 13 payment plan pays these low-priority debts only as much as you can pay them, if anything. That is, you pay “general unsecured” debts only AFTER paying the “priority” and secured debts.

There are exceptions, but this usually means you pay the unsecured part of your vehicle loan only if and to the extent you have money left over after paying other debts during the course of your payment plan. At your case’s completion any remaining amount gets “discharged,” permanently written off, along with your other “general unsecured” debts.

Qualifying for Cramdown, Other Considerations

Next week we’ll get into timing and other considerations in qualifying for a Chapter 13 vehicle loan cramdown.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Saving Your Vehicle through Bankruptcy

September 17th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy can get you out of the dilemma that a vehicle loan can put you in. Chapter 7 works if you can afford the loan payments afterwards.  


Here’s the Problem

You’re paying on a car or truck. You absolutely need this vehicle for getting to work, and to keep your life going. You can’t do without it.

But you’re having trouble keeping up on the loan payments. You owe lots of other debts, so keeping current on the vehicle loan is a big challenge. It’s a big stressor every month.

On top of that there’s a good chance that you owe more on your vehicle than it is worth. You know that if you somehow found other reliable transportation and surrendered your present vehicle—or if it was repossessed—you could easily still owe thousands of dollars of “deficiency balance.” That’s the amount you would owe on the loan after the surrender or repossession.

The amount you’d owe would very likely be much more than you expect. That’s because repossessed vehicles are usually sold at auto auctions, resulting in less credit to your account than you’d expect. Plus the costs of repossession/surrender and sale, and late charges and such would all be added to the balance. So giving up the vehicle doesn’t seem to make any sense.

As a result you feel stuck. You really need the vehicle but you can’t afford pay for it. And even if you could somehow do without it, you’d likely still owe thousands of dollars from letting it go.

Chapter 7 Regular Bankruptcy Gives Limited Help

Chapter 7 bankruptcy accomplishes two things regarding your vehicle loan. First, if you want to keep the vehicle, Chapter 7 would likely get rid of most of your other debts. Maybe then you could afford the vehicle payments. Or second, if you surrendered the vehicle, Chapter 7 would likely discharge (legally write off) the deficiency balance. If you had a way to get another reliable vehicle, or could do without, this might solve your problem.

What Chapter 7 doesn’t do is give you the power to change the terms of your vehicle loan. It’s “take it or leave it.” If you want to keep your vehicle, you’re virtually always stuck with the contract terms. That includes the monthly payment amount, the interest rate, etc.

Plus, you’re almost always required to “reaffirm” the debt. This legally excludes the vehicle loan from the discharge of your debts. You continue to owe it in full in exchange for keeping the vehicle.

This is economically risky. You’re paying for something that isn’t worth what you’re paying. And if you later surrender the vehicle or it’s repossessed, you would owe a deficiency balance. You’d owe it in spite of your prior Chapter 7 case because you reaffirmed the debt.

If You’re Behind on Your Vehicle Loan, or on Insurance

It’s worse if you aren’t current on your loan payments at the time of your Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing. Almost always your vehicle lender would require you to quickly catch up—within a month or two of filing. This would be on top of keeping current on the ongoing monthly payments. Or else you’d lose the vehicle in spite of filing bankruptcy.

If you’ve also let your insurance lapse, it’s even more problematic.  Your lender knows how dangerous lack of insurance is for itself, so it would “force-place” insurance on your vehicle. Your contract almost certainly allows it to do this. Force-placed insurance tends to be very expensive while at the same time provides you very little coverage. Under Chapter 7 you would likely have to pay for any such insurance, plus reinstate your own insurance. And you’d likely have to do this very quickly, not long after filing your Chapter 7 case.  

Chapter 13 Can Solve These Problems

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” can solve these problems that Chapter 7 can’t.

First, Chapter 13 can buy you much more time. A Chapter 13 payment plan would likely give you much more time to catch up on any missed loan payments. It would also likely give you lots more time to pay for any force-placed insurance.

Second, if you qualify for “cramdown” you would likely pay less on the vehicle loan—possibly much less. Cramdown is an informal term for the Chapter 13 procedure for legally re-writing the loan in situations in which the vehicle is worth less than you owe. With cramdown you could both pay less monthly and pay less overall before the vehicle became yours free and clear. And if you’re behind on loan payments, you would not need to catch up at all on any of those missed payments.

Next week we’ll tell you how Chapter 13 could both buy you time and save you money on your vehicle loan(s).

 

Examples of Reaffirmation Agreement vs. Chapter 13

January 5th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Here are examples of the reaffirmation of a secured debt (like a vehicle loan) in a Chapter 7 case vs. addressing it in a Chapter 13 case. 

 

The last blog post was about when to reaffirm a secured debt under Chapter 7 and when to handle that under Chapter 13 instead. This kind of comparison of options can get a bit dry. So today we’re demonstrating how it really works with some examples. We change the facts a few times to show when each of these two options makes more sense.

The Initial Facts

Let’s say a guy named Trevor just fell two months behind on his vehicle loan. He’s at immediate risk of getting his car repossessed. He really needs to keep his vehicle to get to and from work. He’s always behind on his vehicle loan because he has so many other debts—mostly medical bill and unsecured credit cards. What’s especially killing him is that he got sued on some big medical bills and is getting his wages garnished.

Trevor sees a good bankruptcy lawyer. She tells him that filing quickly under either Chapter 7 or 13 would stop the repossession. Either option would also permanently stop the paycheck garnishment. He tells her that his brother can give him the money to catch up on the two missed payments.  The brother is only willing to do this if he takes care of his other debts with some kind of bankruptcy solution.

Chapter 7 Reaffirmation If Can Bring Secured Debt Current

Much of the time if you want to keep collateral on a secured debt in a Chapter 7 case you must bring the debt current within a few weeks, and then reaffirm the debt on its original terms. This is particularly true with vehicle loans with the larger national lenders. In other words, you have to agree to remain fully liable on the debt. You have to agree to continue being legally bound by all the terms of the contract. (See our recent blog posts about the risks of reaffirming.)

Trevor has a relatively easy way to bring his vehicle loan current, thanks to his brother. So his lawyer recommends that he files a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Shortly after filing he can bring the vehicle loan current and sign a reaffirmation agreement. With all his other debts being discharged (legally written off), he’ll be able to keep current on his car payments. Problems solved.

If He Can’t Catch Up Fast

But what if Trevor didn’t have his brother’s help? He may not be able to catch up fast enough to be able to reaffirm his vehicle loan. In a Chapter 7 case he has about 2 months after filing—3 months at the most—to catch up. That’s because you usually have to get current before the creditor will let you reaffirm. And you have to reaffirm before the bankruptcy court enters the “discharge order” about 3 months after filing.

Assuming that Trevor didn’t think he could catch up in time, and because he absolutely didn’t want to risk not being able to keep his car, his lawyer would likely recommend Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” filing instead. This would give him many months—maybe even a couple years—to bring the vehicle loan current.

Other Special Debts Encouraging a Chapter 13 Filing

Now also assume that Trevor’s financial pressures had also put him quite a few months behind on his spousal support.  His ex-spouse had actually been quite flexible, letting him skip payments here and there, or send smaller amounts. But once the lawsuit’s garnishments started, his spousal support payments became even more irregular. So, his ex-spouse got fed up and sent the account to the state’s support enforcement agency. Trevor now finds himself $4,500 behind on support, with aggressive collection to start any moment. And a Chapter 7 filing won’t stop the state’s collection of this support.

Trevor’s lawyer tells him that a Chapter 13 filing WILL stop collection for this $4,500 of support. He’d have up to 5 years to bring that current. His Chapter 13 payment plan would be based on what he could afford to pay. That plan would show how he would—over time—catch up on both the vehicle loan arrearage and the support arrearage, while keeping current on ongoing payments.

His lawyer tells Trevor that a possible downside to Chapter 13 is he’d have to pay all that he could afford to his other creditors during 3 years. (5 years if his income is too high based on his state and family size.) But there may be very little—even possibly nothing—going to his other debts if most of his income goes to living expenses and to bring these two special debts current.

Trevor decides on a Chapter 13 case. He will be able to keep his vehicle, catching up as his budget allows. He also has a reasonable way to bring his big spousal support arrearage current. He knows that at the end of the process he’ll be current on these two, and will otherwise be completely debt free.

 

Be Cautious about Reaffirming a Debt

December 22nd, 2017 at 8:00 am

Reaffirming a debt, including a vehicle loan, can be a very sensible choice. But be fully aware of the risks and possible other options. 

 

Last time we introduced reaffirmation agreements as a good way to keep collateral like a vehicle under Chapter 7. Essentially, you get to keep the vehicle or other collateral in return for agreeing to remain liable on the debt. Plus this enables you to put positive information on your credit report as you make each monthly payment.

But reaffirming a debt comes with risks. You need to be clear about those risks as you consider whether to sign a reaffirmation agreement.

We’ll focus again today on vehicle loan reaffirmations because they are common, and a handy way to explain the issues.

Passing up Your One Opportunity to Escape the Debt

Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” gives you the near-lifetime opportunity to get out from under your debts. Don’t pass up on this opportunity as to any of your debts unless you do so with your eyes wide open.

Be especially careful with relatively large debts, such as a car or truck loan.

Are you are simply assuming that you want your present vehicle and its debt, without seriously considering other alternatives?  Stop and think about whether you have ANY alternatives. Do you have a friend or relative who’d sell (or maybe even give) you another, cheaper, but reasonably reliable vehicle? Does public or other alternate transportation make sense considering how much money you’d save, on monthly payments AND the other many costs of vehicle ownership? What other transportation could you get with the money you’d save without a vehicle payment and the other costs?

Sometimes it absolutely makes sense to get rid of all of your other debts and just reaffirm one. But think long and hard about whether it might be better for you—on the short run and long—to not reaffirm and thus get rid of ALL your debts.

Reaffirmation Risk

The big risk when you reaffirm a debt is having to pay it later when you wished you didn’t. 

Circumstances change. In the context of a vehicle loan, you might not be able to afford the payments like you expected. The vehicle may cost lots more in repairs. A much less expensive vehicle may come your way and you wish you weren’t stuck with the reaffirmed one.  Your job or other life circumstances may change so you don’t need the vehicle so much.

If your vehicle gets repossessed at some point after you’ve reaffirmed the debt you’ll very likely owe a substantial balance. That’s because the creditor will likely sell the repossessed vehicle at an auto auction for very little proceeds. It will apply those modest sale proceeds to the debt, but after likely adding large fees related to the repossession. The creditor will then demand payment of this “deficiency balance” in a lump sum. If you don’t pay it quickly vehicle creditors usually don’t hesitate to sue for that balance.

So after having gone through bankruptcy months or years later you end up with a new serious debt problem. You’d also significantly hurt your credit record just when you’d hoped to make progress after your bankruptcy filing.

Avoiding this Risk

Of course you can avoid this risk by surrendering your vehicle or other collateral and not reaffirming the debt. Any potential deficiency balance or other obligation would then be discharged—permanently written off. This would happen within 3 or 4 months after your bankruptcy filing, and you’d be completely free of the debt.

You MIGHT be able to keep the collateral WITHOUT reaffirming the debt. In SOME circumstances you could just keep current on the payments, fulfill any other obligations on the debt (such as maintaining the required insurance on the vehicle), but NOT enter into a reaffirmation agreement. Under some state laws the creditor could not or would not repossess the vehicle. Then if your circumstances later changed you could surrender the vehicle without owing anything. Because you had not reaffirmed the debt the creditor would only have rights to the collateral itself. It would have no further rights on the debt, including to any deficiency balance.

Talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about whether this “pass-through” option is available on your vehicle or other secured loan. It depends on your state’s laws, the practices of your lender, and sometimes your specific circumstances.

Choosing to Accept the Risk

Reaffirming a debt may be completely sensible. If you definitely need or even strongly want your vehicle (or other collateral), can afford both the monthly payment and other costs of ownership, can do so long-term, reaffirming the debt can be a prudent choice. Just do it only after getting fully informed of the risks and seriously considering the alternatives.

 

A Debt Reaffirmed under Chapter 7

December 20th, 2017 at 8:00 am

You can usually keep collateral you need to keep by entering into a “reaffirmation agreement” with the creditor during your Chapter 7 case. 

 

Last time we got into debts that you might voluntarily pay after a Chapter 7 case out of personal obligation. Today we cover debts voluntarily paid but for the purpose of keeping the collateral that’s securing the debt. This is usually done by “reaffirming” the secured debt.

There can be lots of important side issues with “reaffirmations.” For example, do you always have to reaffirm a debt in order to keep the collateral? What happens if you’re not current on the debt you want to reaffirm? Can you reaffirm a debt when it’s unsecured—when there is no collateral to retain?  When is reaffirming a debt dangerous?

We’ll get to those and other side issues next time. But today we’re introducing reaffirmations in their most straightforward form.

The Straightforward Scenario

Let’s say you’re current on a debt that’s secured by something you definitely want to keep. It could be a home mortgage, a vehicle loan, or a furniture contract—or just about any secured debt. We’ll focus on vehicle loans, since they’re likely the most commonly reaffirmed.

You want and need to keep the vehicle, and maybe have had to work hard to keep the loan current. In fact one of your legitimate reasons for doing bankruptcy is to get rid of other debts so that you CAN keep current on your vehicle loan.

You may even be wonder whether filing bankruptcy might mean you wouldn’t be allowed to keep paying your vehicle loan. Rest assured that’s virtually never a problem. Your creditor wants to be paid, and paid in full. Having you reaffirm the debt makes that much more likely.

The bankruptcy court will generally not have any issue with you reaffirming a secured debt. Assuming your bankruptcy lawyer agrees that it’s in your best interest to keep your vehicle and remain liable on the loan, he or she will sign off on it and the court will allow the reaffirmation to go through.

The Chapter 7 Reaffirmation Agreement

You reaffirm a debt by signing a reaffirmation agreement. This paperwork is usually prepared by the creditor and presented to you through your lawyer. You review it carefully, get fully informed about its effects by your lawyer, have him or her sign it, you sign it, and then it’s filed at the bankruptcy court. It must be filed before the time the court grants you a discharge of your debts. That usually happens about 60 days after your “meeting of creditors,” or about 3 months after your Chapter 7 filing.

The main consequence of a reaffirmation agreement is that it excludes that particular debt from the discharge of your debts. You would owe that single debt as if you hadn’t filed the Chapter 7 bankruptcy case at all. See Section 524(c) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code about the effect of a reaffirmation agreement.

Rescinding a Reaffirmation Agreement

Even after getting well informed by your lawyer and signing the agreement you might change your mind. Your vehicle may all of a sudden need an expensive repair. You may get access to a less expensive vehicle. Or you might get another job enabling you to use public transit and no longer need the vehicle.

Reaffirmation law gives you a SHORT rescission period to change your mind. Your deadline to rescind is either at the time the court discharges your other debts or 60 days after the reaffirmation agreement is filed at court, whichever is later. You rescind by simply telling the creditor that you are doing so. You don’t need to give any reason. See Section 524(c)(4) of the Bankruptcy Code about rescinding a reaffirmation agreement.

Benefit to Your Credit Record

Reaffirming a debt is one of the quickest ways to improve your credit record after bankruptcy. Assuming you want to keep your vehicle (or whatever collateral is on the debt), and it’s in your interest to do so, you can start putting your positive payment history into your credit record the first month after completing your case (if not even a bit sooner). Assuming you’re acting responsibly otherwise your on-time payments should have a positive effect on your credit.

Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13

Reaffirmations happen in Chapter 7; technically not in Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” cases. That’s because under Chapter 13 you generally get to retain your assets in return for working out a repayment plan.

Even without “reaffirmation,” in Chapter 13 if you are current on a secured debt and want to keep the collateral it’s usually just as easy as under Chapter 7.

Chapter 13 can even be a safer way to keep your vehicle. We’ll get into this in an upcoming blog post. For now, be aware that usually keeping a needed, paid-current vehicle works under both options. It’s not likely going to swing your choice towards either Chapter 7 or 13.

 

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