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Is Student Loan Debt Dischargeable in a Texas Bankruptcy?

June 1st, 2020 at 7:51 pm

TX bankruptcy attorney, Texas student loan debt attorney Student loan debt is something that is becoming an issue in the United States. According to the latest statistics from Forbes, there are currently an estimated 45 million borrows who collectively owe about $1.56 trillion in debt for student loans. Of those, around 11 percent are delinquent on their loans, which means they are 90 days or more late on a payment. For many borrowers, student loan payments are expensive and they are struggling to make ends meet. Many have inquired as to whether or not student loan debt is dischargeable in bankruptcy, but the answer is not quite as simple as a “yes” or “no.”

Is it Even Possible?

Many people believe that student loans are ineligible to be included in a bankruptcy and they would be correct — but only in most situations. It is not impossible to discharge your student loan debt in a bankruptcy case, but it will make your bankruptcy more difficult because you will have to file an adversary proceeding to determine whether or not you are eligible to have your student loans discharged.

Determining “Undue Hardship”

During the adversary proceeding, the court will determine whether or not you have demonstrated that paying your student loans has caused you “undue hardship.” The difficulty with this determination is that it was never actually defined and was therefore left up to individual courts and judges to determine. The most commonly used test to determine eligibility for student loan discharge is called the Brunner Test and consists of proving three simple points:

  • You cannot maintain a minimal standard of living in addition to supporting your dependents if you continue to pay the debt
  • Your financial distress is likely to exist for a majority of the repayment period of the loan
  • You have made good faith efforts to repay the loan thus far

Contact a San Antonio, TX Bankruptcy Attorney

If you are having difficulties making your monthly student loan payments because you also have other types of debt, such as credit card or auto loan debt, you still may have options. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we can help you determine whether or not you should pursue bankruptcy and include your student loans in your discharge, or if your best option would be to take another route. Our skilled New Braunfels, TX bankruptcy lawyer can help you through the bankruptcy process from beginning to end. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.studentloanborrowerassistance.org/bankruptcy/#:~:text=Home%20%C2%BB%20Bankruptcy-,Bankruptcy,has%20shown%20an%20undue%20hardship.

https://studentaid.gov/manage-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/bankruptcy

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2020/02/03/student-loan-debt-statistics/#f9cfa89281fe

Pay off Debt and Boost Your Credit with the “One-Two Payment Plan”

July 31st, 2015 at 10:56 am

Texas bankruptcy attorney, debt relief, Texas chapter 7 lawyer,Despite the ominous headlines about the national debt, the percentage of American households that have debt has actually decreased in the last decade, according to the National Census. Still, millions of Americans file for bankruptcy each year due to medical bills, lost employment, and other factors.

If you are facing insurmountable debt, then bankruptcy may be a viable option. There are also alternatives to bankruptcy that can help you manage payments and inch toward financial security. This article will discuss one such method, known as the “one-two payment plan.”

Break Down and Prioritize Your Debt

You might be familiar with the phrase “prioritize your debt,” but this can be a somewhat nebulous piece of advice without a thorough understanding of your current financial state. By carefully examining all of your debts and taking note of balances, interest rates, and payment histories, you will be able to identify which debts to pay first. These are usually the ones with the highest interest rates.

Create a Budget for Paying Debt

After identifying which debts to address first, it is time to create a monthly budget for payments. Often, people mistakenly adjust this budget after paying off their highest priority debt. However, it is critical that you maintain this budget until you have paid off all creditors. This not only will help you pay debts faster, but it will also improve your credit score with a steady history of consistent payments.

When in Doubt, Seek Professional Advice

Although the one-two payment plan can make a significant difference in your financial life, debt can be a difficult hurdle to overcome. In many cases, filing for bankruptcy is an intelligent decision that offers debtors a faster path toward financial stability.

If you would like to learn if you are a good candidate for bankruptcy, contact the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee for a free initial consultation. As an experienced San Antonio bankruptcy attorney, Mr. McGhee can evaluate your financial situation and provide valuable guidance. To schedule a consultation, call our office today at 210-342-3400.

Texas Ranks as a Best State for Student Debt Among the $1.12 Trillion Owed Nationwide

November 4th, 2014 at 12:59 pm

According to a recent study by WalletHub, the state of Texas ranks as number nine in the list for the “best” student loan debt. WalletHub analyzed all 50 states (including the District of Columbia) using 7 key metrics, including average student debt, unemployment rates, and students with past-due loan balances.

Though nine out of 51 may be good news for the Lone Star State, the rest of the country is not doing as well. As of June 2014, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, total outstanding student loan debt stood at $1.12 trillion, an increase of $7 billion from 2013.

According to the WalletHub study, though the risk of joblessness declines with the more schooling you have, location also has a large effect on college debt levels. This means that if you live in a city or state where the economy is booming, you are more likely to pay off your student debt on time, without penalties.

While Texas continues on the up and up, other states in the bottom, including Massachusetts (30), Washington D.C. (41), and Rhode Island (51), continue to suffer.

In May 2014, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren proposed a bill to allow students to refinance their loans at a lower interest rate called the “Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act.” The Democratic senator and her party argued that the $1 trillion in student loan debt is harming the U.S. economic growth and that something must be done to alleviate it. Unfortunately, in September, Republicans opposing the bill struck it down. The Act would have allowed more than 25 million students to refinance their loans to today’s lower interest rates of less than four percent.

For now, it does not seem like student loan debt in any state will be alleviated anytime soon. With the political battle constantly stalling bills able to assist student loan debtors, the educated middle class will only continue to suffer.

If you or your college-aged son or daughter is suffering from crippling student loan debt in Texas, contact an experienced San Antonio bankruptcy lawyer. Attorney Chance M. McGhee can help you determine which bankruptcy option may be best for your individual situation. Call 203-342-3400 for a free consultation.

Debt Coping: What to Do When a Child Passes Away

March 31st, 2014 at 12:45 pm

student loan debt, San Antonio bankruptcy lawyer, San Antonio bankruptcy attorney, Texas lawyerGoing through the process of grieving a child is devastating for any parent. However it can be even more challenging to move on when private student loan debt follows that individual after the child has passed away.

While most federal student loan debt is wiped out when a person passes away, private lenders may try to go after family members. If you are trying to cope with this situation, you may have a way out: bankruptcy.

Just ask Francisco Reynoso of California. His son died in a car accident in 2008, but Reynoso was on the line for six figures of student loan debt for which he had cosigned. With an income of just $21,000 per year, Reynoso was trying to grieve the loss of his child while avoid collection calls and demands from private lenders.

Some of the debt had been transferred to private investors outside of the original lender, making it difficult to identify which company was connected with each debt. Reynoso wasn’t even sure whether it was possible to negotiate settlements because he did not know who had taken over the loans.

Ultimately, he felt backed into a corner, unable to meet the payment demands. He decided to go through bankruptcy so that he could finally wave goodbye to the loans and lenders and instead focus on grieving his son and healing.

Parents taking on co-signing responsibilities are likely not concerned about having to make these massive payments in the future because they expect the child to get a job after graduation, rather than expecting them to pass away.

A child who passes away may leave behind big private student loan debt that is impossible for parents to pay off. In these cases, bankruptcy can provide a way out and a fresh start. If you would like to know how the process can help you, contact a Texas bankruptcy attorney today.

Student loan debt may soon be eligible for discharge in bankruptcy.

April 9th, 2013 at 2:39 pm

student loan debt    (Kerry)The Fairness for Struggling Students Act of 2013 would forgive private student loan debt when an individual files for bankruptcy protection. The bill, cosponsored by Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and Jack Reed (D-Ill.), would reverse 2005 legislation that makes it almost impossible to have private student loan debt discharged in bankruptcy.

According to an article in the Huffington Post, student loans total $1 trillion, or nearly $25,000 per borrower, on average, nationally, each year, yet they are the only loans not eligible for bankruptcy protection. Federal student loans have been protected from bankruptcy claims since 1978. However, those loans typically have lower interest rates, income-based repayment plans and more deferment and forbearance options. Like credit cards, private student loans typically have double-digit, variable interest rates that are highest for the people who can least afford them and have no income-based repayment options.

Sen. Durbin has previously introduced the bill in 2010 and 2011. “Young Americans are being hamstrung by record debt levels,” Durbin said. “Unless we take action to protect borrowers, student loan debt will be the next mortgage crisis.”

Organizations such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute for College

Access have all voiced their support for the bill. Sallie Mae, a major private student loan institute, has also said they are open to bankruptcy reform for student loans.

If you are struggling with loans and are having a difficult time financially, contact Texas bankruptcy attorney today to find out what legal options you may have.

Call today for a FREE Consultation

210-342-3400

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