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Debts You Don’t List in Your Bankruptcy Case

April 1st, 2019 at 7:00 am

If you don’t list a debt in your bankruptcy case, and don’t add it in on time, it may not be written off.  So carefully include all debts. 

 

Supposed to List All Creditors 

You can’t pick and choose which debts to include in your bankruptcy case. The U.S. Bankruptcy Code says that the first duty of a bankruptcy debtor is to provide “a list of creditors.” Section 521(a)(1) of Bankruptcy Code. That list includes secured, priority, and unsecured debts, which you put on Schedules D, E and F, respectively. As these Official Forms state clearly, you must

  • “List All Secured Claims”
  • “List All of Your Priority Unsecured Claims”
  • “List All of Your Nonpriority Unsecured Claims”

In the Declarations page you declare “Under penalty of perjury” that the “schedules filed with this declaration… are true and correct.” That page includes the very stern warning that “Making a false statement … can result in fines up to $250,000, in imprisonment for up to 20 years, or both.”

Truthfully, that is an overly stern warning because penalties like that simply don’t happen in the consumer bankruptcy context. Not for not including a debt!

The point is that it’s a federal crime to intentionally lie on your bankruptcy documents. So you need to list all your debts. Talk with you bankruptcy lawyer if you believe you have a reason for not listing a debt. There’s usually a practical solution to your concerns.

Unlisted Debts Not Written Off

Today’s blog post is not so much about intentionally not listing a debt but doing so inadvertently. If somehow you don’t include a debt in your bankruptcy schedules you risk owing that debt after your case is over.

In the last 5 weeks we’ve covered the following categories of debts not written off in bankruptcy:

  • Criminal fines and restitution
  • Income taxes
  • Child and spousal support
  • Student loans
  • Damages arising from driving intoxicated

Debts “neither listed nor scheduled” in a debtor’s bankruptcy documents are another category of debts not written off. Section 523(a)(3) of the Bankruptcy Code.

If You Forgot a Debt

If you didn’t include a debt in the schedules filed by your bankruptcy lawyer, you can often add it later. But you may need to act quickly.

Figuring out your deadline to add a missing creditor is somewhat tricky. It depends on the nature of the debt and the nature of your case.

The Deadline(s) to Add a Debt

First, if the debt is of the kind that the creditor could object to the writing off of the debt based on certain bad actions by you (for example, lying about your financial situation to acquire the debt), then there is a short, strict deadline. You have to add the debt to the case in time for the creditor to have time to object.  The objection deadline is usually about 3 months after you file your case. So you’d have to add the debt a bit before that. Section 523(a)(3)(B) of the Bankruptcy Code.

Second, if your case gives the creditors the opportunity to get paid something through your bankruptcy case, you have a different deadline to add a debt. Most Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” cases don’t give most creditors the right to receive anything from the case. There are no assets to distribute to creditors (when all a debtor’s assets are “exempt,” or protected). If there ARE assets to distribute (because some asset(s) are not exempt), the bankruptcy clerk sends out a notice providing a deadline for creditors to ask for a share of the assets. Creditors do so by filing a “proof of claim” documenting their debt. So in this situation you have to add a debt a bit before that deadline. Section 523(a)(3)(A) of the Bankruptcy Code.

In Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” cases usually the debtor pays some portion of most or debts. Within a couple of weeks after you file a Chapter 13 case the clerk sends out a notice giving creditors a deadline to file proofs of claim. You have to add a debt a bit before that deadline.

Other Scenarios

What if you may owe a debt but don’t know that you may? For example, someone thinks you’ve caused them some injury or damages but hasn’t told you yet.

Or what if you’ve lost track of a debt or debts because you’ve moved and lost your records? If the debt is not on your credit report, you may have no way to recall and list the debt. Can you write off this debt?

Also, does it matter if a creditor has somehow found out about your case even though you neglected to list the debt?

Finally, what if the debt has been sold from one debt collector to another without your knowledge? How can you list a debt in order to successfully write if off if you don’t know who you owe?

We’ll cover these other scenarios next week.

 

Types of Debt in Chapter 13 Bankruptcies

February 8th, 2019 at 11:01 pm

TX bankruptcy lawyerThere is more than one type of bankruptcy, although Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies are the most common. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, your attorney and a team of other professionals are able to help you develop a repayment plan to pay back your debts. The repayment plan lasts for three to five years, depending on a variety of circumstances. Chapter 13 bankruptcies can be beneficial to individuals because it allows you to keep certain assets, such as your vehicle or your home. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, certain debts must be repaid before other debts.

Priority Debts

Priority debts are exactly what they sound like — priority over other debts. These debts must be included in any repayment plan you enter and the plan must make sure that your priority debts are paid off first and in full. Typically priority debts include:

  • Past-due child support;
  • Past-due spousal support;
  • Unpaid taxes; or
  • Unpaid wages that you owe employees within the past six months.

Secured Debts

Debts that can be secured by certain property are called secured debts. These types of debts are called secured debts because they can be attached to specific property. If you fail to repay the debts as agreed, the creditor can take back the property. The most common examples of secured debts include:

  • Home loans or mortgages; or
  • Car loans.

Unsecured Debts

Unsecured debts are basically all other debts that you may have. Unsecured debt has no property that can be attached to it, so there is nothing that the creditor can repossess if you do not pay. Common examples of unsecured debt include:

  • Medical bills;
  • Credit card debt;
  • Personal loans;
  • Utility bills; and
  • Business loans.

A Texas Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Attorney Can Help

United States bankruptcy law is extremely complex and is best handled by a professional. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we have dealt with over 20 years worth of bankruptcy cases and we know the ins and outs of the bankruptcy process. Our skilled New Braunfels Chapter 13 bankruptcy lawyer can help you sort out your finances and come up with a repayment plan that works for you. To get started reviewing your case, call our office at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Source:

https://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy/bankruptcy-basics/chapter-13-bankruptcy-basics

 

Your Debts in Bankruptcy

February 4th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy is about debts. Different categories of debts are treated differently. The categories are secured, priority and general unsecured 


Your debts are the reason you are reading this. You want to know how bankruptcy would deal with your debts.

  • Will bankruptcy write off all your debts?
  • Can you keep paying some of your debts like a vehicle loan or home mortgage to keep that vehicle or home?
  • What happens to special debts that you can’t write off like child support and some income taxes?

To answer these and other similar questions we start by getting to know the 3 legally different categories of debts: 

  • secured
  • priority
  • general unsecured

Your rights and obligations, and those of the creditor, are different with each category of debt.

Secured Debts

Each of your debts is either secured by something you own or it is not. A secured debt is backed up by a lien, a legal interest of the creditor in some kind of property of yours. See Section 101(37) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Usually you know whether a debt is secured. For example, in a vehicle loan the vehicle’s title states that your lender is the lienholder. That lien on the title makes the loan secured by the vehicle. That, together with the security agreement you signed, gives the lender certain rights over your vehicle.

Sometimes you don’t know whether a debt is secured. For example, most purchases on major credit cards create a debt that is not secured by whatever you purchased. But some card purchases—such as on some retail store affiliated cards—do create a secured debt. The paperwork that came with your card (which you’ve likely thrown away!) should tell you. Your bankruptcy lawyer will also likely know, or can find out.

Occasionally, a creditor wanted the debt to be secured but it isn’t because the creditor messed up. It didn’t take the legal steps required to make that happen. This could mean that you don’t have to pay the underlying debt and still get to keep the property at issue.

A debt could also be only partially secured. If you owe $10,000 on a vehicle worth only $6,000, the debt is partially secured. It’s secured as to the $6,000 value of the vehicle and unsecured as to the remaining $4,000 of the debt. (See Section 506 of the Bankruptcy Code.) In the right circumstances you would not need to pay the full $10,000 debt and could still keep the vehicle.

Priority Debts

The law has selected some debts to be treated better than others, each for certain specific reasons. For example, child support payments are given many advantages, both inside and outside bankruptcy, because legislatures have decided that paying child support is an extremely high societal priority.

Priority debts are themselves prioritized within their different types. The higher-priority priority debts are treated better than the lower-priority one. Here’s a list of the most common priority debts for consumers or small business owners in order of priority:

  • child and spousal support
  • certain wages and other compensation owed to a debtor’s employees
  • certain (usually more recent) income taxes, and some other kinds of taxes

Priority debts are important in bankruptcy for a practical reason. Often only certain debts get paid, or get paid more than other debts. So a priority debt may get paid in full while other debts get paid little or nothing. We’ll explore how this works in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 in our upcoming blog posts.

General Unsecured Debts

All debts that are not secured are unsecured debts.  “General” unsecured debts are just unsecured debts that are also not priority debts. So if a debt is not secured and does not fit any of the priority debt types, it’s general unsecured.  

Most people considering bankruptcy have mostly (and sometimes only) general unsecured debts. These include every possible way you can owe a debt. Examples include: most credit cards, just about all medical debts, personal loans without collateral, NSF checks, payday loans without collateral, unpaid rent and utilities, older income taxes, repossessed vehicle balances, most student loans, and other contract or legal claims against you.

Previously secured debts sometimes become general unsecured ones. One example: after a vehicle gets repossessed and sold, any remaining debt is a general unsecured one. Also, previously unsecured debts sometimes get secured. A general unsecured credit card balance can become secured by your home if the creditor sues you, gets a judgment, and records a judgment lien against your home.

 

Starting next week we’ll show how these different categories of debts are treated in bankruptcy.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Use “Preference” Money to Pay a Favored Debt

April 2nd, 2018 at 7:00 am

When a creditor is forced to pay back recently received money through “preference” law, that money can go to pay a debt you want to be paid. 


Last week we introduced the law of preferences. This law says that if a creditor takes or receives money from you within the 90 days before you file your bankruptcy case, the creditor may need to pay it back. There are some complicated conditions that may apply, but in many situations the creditor does need to pay it back. See Section 547 of the Bankruptcy Code.

We ended last week by asking where this returned money goes. What good does it do you if that money just goes to your Chapter 7 trustee?  After all, this liquidating trustee’s job is to distribute that money among all your other creditors. So how does that help you?

Chapter 7 Trustee’s Collection of Bankruptcy Assets

It’s true that under Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” it’s your bankruptcy trustee who makes a creditor return a “preferential payment.” The Bankruptcy Code says “the trustee may avoid” a preference payment. It’s not you, the debtor, who has that role. Section 547(b). (“Avoid” means requiring the creditor to pay the recently received money back, but to the trustee.)

That returned money then goes into the pool of money the trustee uses to pay your creditors. In most consumer Chapter 7 cases that’s the only money available to the trustee. That’s because everything that most debtors own is protected through property exemptions. Exemptions are categories and maximum amounts of assets that you can keep in bankruptcy under state and/or federal law. So, when a trustee avoids, or undoes a creditor’s preferential payment, that money is all the trustee has to work with.

Whether the trustee only has the preference money or also liquidates an unprotected asset, what happens to the resulting money?

Chapter 7 Trustee’s Distribution of Bankruptcy Assets

Once the trustee has received the preference money (plus any other money from liquidating assets), he or she is required by law to then distribute that money in a very specific way. The law is laid out in the Bankruptcy Code’s Section 726, “Distribution of property of the [bankruptcy] estate.”

The distribution rules say that “priority” debts get paid in full before anything goes to any other debt.  Section 726(a)(1) says the money first goes to debts under Section 507, which are a listing of the priority debts.

When an “Avoided Preference” Directly Benefits You

Simply put, if you want or need to pay a debt that’s a “priority” debt, the trustee will pay it. The trustee will pay it out of the money it got from the creditor by “avoiding” the preference payment. The trustee will pay your favored priority debt before paying any other debt.

For example, an unpaid child support payment or recent income tax debt would be a priority debt. These debts could not be discharged—legally written off—in a bankruptcy case. So you’d have to pay them after your Chapter 7 case was completed. But the trustee would pay such a debt from the preference money. That would either eliminate or reduce what you’d have to pay yourself.

If your priority debt that you’d like to be paid is larger than the amount of money the trustee has from the preference, the trustee would only pay part of that priority debt. If the trustee has more than enough money, he or she would pay off the whole priority debt.

(The trustee also gets paid a fee out of the same money, so you need to take that fee into account. The fee is based on a sliding scale: a maximum of 25% on the first $5,000 distributed, 10% on the next $45,000, etc. See Section 326(a).)

Conclusion

Preference law can make a creditor give up money it took from you shortly before you filed your bankruptcy case. Then this same money can instead go to pay a priority debt which you very much want to get paid.

This is quite a nice benefit of bankruptcy. You can force one of your less important creditors in effect to pay your most important creditor!

Limited Automatic Stay Protection for Unpaid Child/Spousal Support

February 7th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 doesn’t stop collection of unpaid support, but may enable you to catch up. Chapter 13 does stop this collection, conditionally.   

 

Our recent blog posts have been about situations when creditor collection actions are not stopped by a bankruptcy filing.  An example is a criminal fine or restitution. A bankruptcy filing has no effect on your obligation to pay criminal debts or on the collection of those debts.

We’ve also gotten into situations when collections are stopped only temporarily, including when that’s long enough to solve your problem. An example is a recent income tax debt. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing stops tax collections only for a few months. But that should be long enough to start a monthly payment plan, especially one that you can now afford after getting rid of all or most of your other debts.

So today we get into one special kind of debt for which the debt collection either doesn’t stop at all, is stopped only temporarily, or is stopped permanently. If you are behind on child or spousal support, you have three options in bankruptcy.

  • Filing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” does not stop collections on unpaid support at all. But it may write off enough other debts so that you can catch up on support.
  • Filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” can stop collections on unpaid support. But that can easily become only temporary.
  • A Chapter 13 case can stop such collections IF you act very proactively and consistently.

We explain these today.

The “Automatic Stay” on Support Collections

Unpaid child and spousal support is a very special kind of debt. It is treated as an almost sacredly among debt. Without cataloging all the differences, you can never discharge (legally write off) a support debt. (See Sections 523(a)(5) and 101(14A) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code). It is the highest priority of the many so-called priority debts—meaning it must be paid ahead of all other debts. (See Section 507(a)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code.)

Unpaid support is special also in that you’re helped by the automatic stay only in to a limited extent. However that limited extent may nevertheless be extremely helpful.

Some Limited Help in Chapter 7

As we said above, the automatic stay does not even come into play under Chapter 7 as to unpaid support. But in the right situations Chapter 7 still helps by discharging all or most of your other debts so that you can afford to catch up on your unpaid support.

You or your attorney would negotiate terms for catching up with your ex-spouse or with the support enforcement agency. If getting rid of your other debts gives you the financial ability to catch up quickly on support, Chapter 7 could be a practical solution.

The Practical Problem

The problem is that your spouse or support enforcement may no longer accept terms that would work for you.  Since Chapter 7 does nothing to stop your ex-spouse or support enforcement from continuing or starting collection efforts against you, you have no leverage and no protection.

Temporary Help in Chapter 13

Filing a Chapter 13 case DOES stop support collections at least temporarily. But your ex-spouse or the support agency can quickly file a motion asking to resume collections. The bankruptcy court would likely grant this motion unless you meet a set of requirements, and do so timely and extremely consistently. If you don’t, actions to collect on the unpaid support could resume quickly.

Permanent Help in Chapter 13

However, IF you DO strictly follow the requirement, the collection of unpaid support obligations IS stopped under Chapter 13. And this collection continues being on hold throughout the 3-to-5-year course of the Chapter 13 case as long as you continue meeting those requirements.

Here are those crucial requirements:

  • Your Chapter 13 payment PLAN shows how you will pay all the upaid support debt during the plan period.
  • You pay any future ONGOING monthly support payments on time. It’s especially important that you’re on time with the payments due shortly after you file the Chapter 13 case.
  • You actually DO pay your monthly Chapter 13 plan payments on time throughout the case. Otherwise you’re not paying the unpaid support debt as you committed to do in your plan.

If you follow these requirements to the letter your ex-spouse/support enforcement agency would not be able to get court permission to take any collection actions against you throughout the Chapter 13 case. Then by the end of the payment plan you’d be current on the support. Your problems on this front would be fully resolved.

 

“General Unsecured Debts” in Chapter 13

December 13th, 2017 at 8:00 am

You pay your general unsecured debts only as much as you can afford during a Chapter 13 plan, with the rest then legally written off forever.  

 

Our last blog post was about how Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” deals with “general unsecured debts.” Mostly, they are discharged—legally, permanently written off. There are some exceptions. At the end of the last blog post we said we’d talk next about those exceptions. But before we do, today we want to give the Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” side. What happens to “general unsecured debts” in a Chapter 13 case?

“Priority” and “General Unsecured” Debts

First, let’s remind you about the difference between these two kinds of unsecured debts. The difference is crucial because of how they completely differently they are treated in a Chapter 13 case.

Remember that priority debts are specific categories of debts that the law says must be treated very specially. They are all on a list at Section 507 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The main “priority” debts in consumer Chapter 13 cases are past-due child and spousal support and certain recent income tax debts.

If an unsecured debt is not on the list of priority debts then it’s a general unsecured debt. They are by far the most common kind of debt.

The Difference in Treatment under Chapter 13

You must pay priority debts in full during the course of the 3-to-5-year Chapter 13 payment plan. You usually only have to pay general unsecured debts to the extent you have money available to pay them.

So, priority debts have to be paid 100%. General unsecured debts are often paid only a small percent, often only 5-10%, sometimes maybe even 0%.

In most situations the result is that during your Chapter 13 payment period you must pay your priority debts in full before paying your general unsecured debts anything.

General Unsecured Debts during a Chapter 13 Case

So during a Chapter 13 case you pay your general unsecured debts as much as you can pay them. But that’s after paying your living expenses, and your secured and priority debts. You usually even get to pay the costs of your case (your bankruptcy lawyer’s fees) and trustee fees ahead of your general unsecured debts.  

In fact, if your income goes down or expenses go up during your case, you may even be able to amend your payment plan to reduce what the general unsecured debts get paid because you can no longer afford to pay them as much as you originally expected.

General Unsecured Debts at the End of a Chapter 13 Case

After all this, what happens to your general unsecured debts at your successful completion of a Chapter 13 case? After paying these debts as much as you can afford to pay them (as specified in your court-approved payment plan), the remaining balance, no matter how much, is discharged—legally written off.

At that point you’ve paid your priority debts in full. To the extent you are taking care of secured debts (home mortgage, vehicle loan, furniture debt, etc.), you’ve paid all you need to pay them, leaving them current or paid off. You’ve paid the general unsecured debts whatever percentage (if any) your plan provides, with the rest discharged. You are now current on one or two long-term secured debts you’ve chosen to keep (if you had any), and otherwise you’re completely debt-free.

 

“General Unsecured Debts” in Chapter 7

December 11th, 2017 at 8:00 am

In a Chapter 7 case all or most “general unsecured debts” get “discharged”—legally written off. That’s one of the big benefits of Chapter 7.  

 

Last time we said there are two kinds of unsecured debts, “priority” and “general unsecured”:

  • “Priority” debts are those that the law treats as special for various reasons. Past-due child support and unpaid recent income taxes are “priority” debts. The law treats them as special, by treating them much better than other unsecured debts. You can find a list of all the priority debts at Section  507 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.
  • “General unsecured” debts are simply the rest of the unsecured debts, those that aren’t “priority.”  “General unsecured” debts include most unsecured ones. Examples are almost all medical and credit card debts, retail accounts, personal loans, many payday and internet loans, unpaid utilities and other similar bills, claims against you arising out accidents or other bodily injuries, damages arising from contracts and business disputes, overdrawn checking accounts, bounced checks, the remaining debt after a vehicle repossession or real estate foreclosure, and countless other kinds. If the debt is not secured, and isn’t “priority,” then its “general unsecured.”

We’ll get into “priority” debts later. Today’s post is about how “general unsecured” debts are dealt with in Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.

The Discharge of Debts

The main goals of a Chapter 7 case are 1) to stop creditors’ collection actions against you and then 2) to discharge as many of your debts as possible.

First, creditor collections are virtually all stopped by the “automatic stay.” This includes general unsecured debts. We discussed the automatic stay in our blog post of November 22, 2017. We compared how it works in Chapter 7 and 13. Also, see Section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code about it.

Second, in most Chapter 7 cases all “general unsecured debts” get discharged. See Section 727 of the Bankruptcy Code about the discharge of debts.

The discharge happens quite quickly. About 100 days after your bankruptcy lawyer files your case, the bankruptcy court enters a discharge order. Here is a very straightforward version of the Order of Discharge, consisting basically of this single short sentence: “A discharge under 11 U.S.C.  [the Bankruptcy Code] is granted to [Debtor].” Your assigned bankruptcy judge signs this order.

The Effect of Discharge

The effect of this discharge order is explained right on this form order, stating:

Creditors cannot collect discharged debts

This order means that no [creditor] may make any attempt to collect a discharged debt from the debtors personally. For example, creditors cannot sue, garnish wages, assert a deficiency, or otherwise try to collect from the debtors personally on discharged debts. Creditors cannot contact the debtors by mail, phone, or otherwise in any attempt to collect the debt personally. Creditors who violate this order can be required to pay debtors damages and attorney’s fees.

Most General Unsecured Debts Get Discharged

“Priority” debts don’t get discharged. For example, unpaid child or spousal support can never be discharged. Nor can recent income taxes.

But most general unsecured debts do get discharged. There are some exceptions. We’ll cover those next time.

 

Unsecured Debts in Bankruptcy

December 8th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Your debts are either secured by something you own, or they are unsecured. Unsecured debts are either “priority” or “general unsecured.”  


Unsecured Debts

Debts that are unsecured are those which are not legally tied to anything you own. The creditor has no “security” attached to the debt, no “security interest” in anything. It has no right to repossess or seize anything of yours if you don’t pay the debt.  It can only pursue the debt itself.

It’s usually easier to deal with unsecured debts than secured ones in bankruptcy. Most unsecured debts can be discharged—legally written off—through either Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” or Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”

An Unsecured Debt Can Sometimes Turn into a Secured One

Under some circumstances an unsecured debts can become secured if you don’t pay it.

For example, you could be sued by the creditor on a debt, resulting in a judgment against you. The creditor may be able to turn that judgment into a lien against your home and other possessions. The debt would then be secured by your home and/or other possessions. (The details of this depend on your state’s laws.)

Another example: if you get behind on income taxes the IRS can record a tax lien against your real estate and personal property. It does not need to sue you.

Filing bankruptcy can stop a lawsuit from turning into a judgment lien. It can often stop the recording of an IRS tax lien. In these and similar situations it’s much better to file bankruptcy before creditors can turn unsecured debts into secured ones.

Also, Sometimes a Secured Debts Can Turn into an Unsecured One

After a secured creditor repossesses or seizes its “security,” and sells it, any remaining debt would then be unsecured.

 A secured debt could become unsecured in various other ways. The “security” could be lost or destroyed, leaving the creditor with nothing to seize. Another secured creditor with prior rights could seize the “security,” leaving the creditor with the “junior” position no longer secured. There are various tools in bankruptcy for turning secured debts into unsecured ones.

Seemingly Secured Debts May Actually Be Unsecured

Creating a “security interest”—a creditor’s rights over its “security—takes specific legal steps. If the creditor fails to take those steps appropriately, a debt that seemed to be secured actually isn’t. Your bankruptcy lawyer may ask you (or the creditor) for documentation to find out if a certain debt is really secured.                                   

Two Kinds of Unsecured Debts

There are two kinds of unsecured debts: “priority” and “general unsecured.”

“Priority” debts are those that the law treats as special for various reasons. Past-due child support and unpaid recent income taxes are “priority” debts. The law treats them as special, mostly by putting them ahead of other unsecured debts. Generally, “priority” debts have to be paid in full in bankruptcy before other unsecured debts receive anything.

“General unsecured” debts are simply the rest of the unsecured debts, those that aren’t “priority.”  “General unsecured” debts include most unsecured ones. Examples are almost all medical and credit card debts, retail accounts, personal loans, many payday and internet loans, unpaid utilities and other similar bills, claims against you arising out accidents or other bodily injuries, damages arising from contracts and business disputes, overdrawn checking accounts, bounced checks, the remaining debt after a vehicle repossession or real estate foreclosure, and countless other kinds. If the debt is not secured, and isn’t “priority,” then its “general unsecured.”

Unsecured Debts in Bankruptcy

In the next blog posts we’ll look at how Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 treat “priority” and “general unsecured” debts. Depending on which kinds of debts you have, these will help you understand and choose between these two options.

 

Chapter 7 or 13? You May Be Surprised

November 15th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 takes about 4 months, while Chapter 13 takes 3 to 5 years, and likely costs more. But that doesn’t begin to answer which is better. 

 

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13

Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” is usually, but not always, for simpler situations. It’s often the right choice if your income is relatively low, your assets are modest, and your debts are straightforward.  You keep all of your assets, all or most of your debts are discharged (legally written off), and if you want you keep paying on your vehicle and/or your mortgage or rent.

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is usually, but not always, better for somewhat more complicated situations. Your income may be too high to qualify for Chapter 7. You may have an asset or two that is not “exempt”—not protected. Or you may have debts much better handled under Chapter 13. Do you owe income taxes or student loans or a second mortgage? Are you behind on a vehicle loan, home mortgage, property tax, or child or spousal support? These and certain other kinds of debts are often handled much better in a Chapter 13 case.

Overall, these two options each have advantages and disadvantages that need to be carefully matched to you and your goals. Chapter 7 may be able to solve immediate problems and do so quickly. Chapter 13 is more expensive but that can be far outweighed by the money you save over using Chapter 7. In some situations the unique tools of Chapter 13 can save a person many thousands of dollars. Chapter 13 takes so much longer but that length can itself be an advantage. When you need or want to pay a special debt, you can stretch payments out to lower their monthly amount. So it just depends on your personal situation.

Be Flexible When You Meet with your Lawyer

You’re reading this blog post, so we’re glad that you’re working on getting informed about your options. But it’s also important to have an open mind when you go to see your bankruptcy lawyer for legal advice. If you do inform yourself in advance you may tentatively decide which option is best for you. Or you may just not know. It is easy to not be aware of a crucial advantage or disadvantage that could be decisive. So don’t be too convinced about going with one option when the other may actually be better.

Sometime Easy, Sometimes Difficult Choice

The reality is that sometimes it’s pretty clear which option is better for you. Sometimes you only qualify for one of the two. Or your circumstances can push your decision strongly towards either Chapter 7 or 13. In these situations, you may have an easy choice.

But often you qualify for both. It’s not unusual that each gives you some advantages and disadvantages that the other doesn’t. Especially in these situations it’s crucial to know all these advantages and disadvantages in order to make the best choice.  Then it comes down to a deeply personal decision based on what goals and benefits are most important to you.

To Help You Be Informed

It IS good to be as informed as you much as your time and energy allows. This choice between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 is very important. So during the next few weeks we’ll look at the differences between them.

 

Treatment of Different Types of Creditors in Chapter 13

July 26th, 2017 at 7:00 am

The laws about the treatment of different types of creditors can often be used in your favor to pay who you want or need to pay. 


Your Chapter 13 payment plan has to treat debts that are legally the same type of debts essentially the same way. But your plan can and must treat different types of debts quite differently. The laws related to this can be used to your advantage in many, many ways. Today we begin showing how this works with each of the three major types of debts.

Secured Debts

A secured debt is one which is legally tied to something you own. The secured creditor has rights against that property you own. Those rights usually include to repossess or foreclose on the property if you don’t pay the debt.

For example, your home mortgage(s), unpaid property taxes, judgments with liens on your home, income tax liens can all be debts secured against your home. And your vehicle loan is secured against your vehicle.

Debts may be secured because you directly agreed to make them secured, like a vehicle loan. But debts can also be secured involuntarily by certain creditors in certain circumstances. An involuntary example is an income tax lien on your home.

Secured creditors have rights against whatever property of yours secures their debt. That gives them leverage in a Chapter 13 case if you want to keep that property. You usually have to pay part or all of the debt to keep the property.

If you want to keep the property securing the debt, and it’s something reasonably necessary for you to keep (like your primary vehicle or your home), that creditor leverage actually helps you. It usually allows you to favor that creditor over most of your other creditors.  This means that you can pay your secured debt ahead of or instead of most other debts.

For example, you would usually be allowed to catch up on a vehicle loan in your Chapter 13 plan ahead of paying your unsecured credit cards. Often as a result your vehicle loan gets paid in full while your credit cards get only partially paid. Sometimes the credit cards (and other such unsecured debts) get nothing at all.

Priority Debts

Priority debts are simply those which the law has determine are worthy of more favored treatment over other debts. Each type of priority debt has a particular reason for being treated specially.

Some of the most common and important priority debts for consumers are child and spousal support and recent income taxes. Support obligations are treated as special because of the hardship nonpayment tends to cause. Taxes are treated as special because their nonpayment hurts everyone.

In a Chapter 13 payment plan, you must pay priority debts in full before paying other unsecured creditors anything. As with secured debts, you usually want and need to pay your priority debts. You may well have decided to file a Chapter 13 case because you are protected while paying your priority debt(s).

As with secured debts, being required to pay your priority debt(s) ahead of other unsecured debts means those other debts get less, and sometimes nothing. You are essentially paying the priority debts to the detriment of your other debts.

General Unsecured Debts

This third type includes everything else. These are debts that have no rights to anything you own, and are not on the list of priority debts.

A Chapter 13 plan may pay general unsecured debts anything from 0% of what you owe them to 100%, depending on the circumstances. How much you pay your general unsecured debts depends on many factors. Broadly speaking, these debts get paid whatever is left over after you pay the secured and priority debts.

Limited Flexibility 

In Chapter 13 you and your bankruptcy lawyer have to follow a detailed set of rules about treatment of creditors. But those rules come with a certain amount of flexibility. The rules give structure to a Chapter 13 plan. The flexibility can help make it work to fit your unique personal circumstances.

We’ll show specific ways that these somewhat flexible rules can help you in our next few blog posts.

 

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