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Archive for the ‘paying creditors’ tag

An Example of a “Preference”

December 10th, 2018 at 8:00 am

A “preference” makes more sense when you see an example. Here’s one. This also helps explain how to avoid creating one. 

 

Last week we explained why paying a creditor before filing bankruptcy could cause problems during bankruptcy. That’s especially true if the creditor you pay is one that you have personal reasons to favor. We explained the circumstances in which such a payment might possibly be considered a “preference,” or a “preferential payment.”  If so, your favored creditor could well be required to return the money you paid, except not to you but rather to your bankruptcy trustee, for distribution to your creditors in general.

We ended last week saying we’d next give you an example of a preferential payment made during the holidays, and practical ways to avoid it.

Our Holiday Example

Imagine that you owe your sister $3,000 for loaning you this money in 2016 to pay your mortgage (or rent). Nothing was put in writing, and you didn’t have to pay interest. But you and your sister agreed that you had to pay it back. Now she’s unexpectedly getting a divorce and she really needs the money. You’re planning on filing bankruptcy early in 2019. You’ve stopped paying most of your other creditors and are making extra money from a part-time job during the holidays. So you now have the $3,000 to pay her back.  

Here’s what would likely happen if you paid her now and then filed a bankruptcy case within a year of doing so.

A month or two after filing bankruptcy the bankruptcy trustee would very likely demand that your sister pay $3,000 to the trustee.

The $3,000 would likely be considered a preferential payment because it was:

  • made within 365 days before the bankruptcy filing
  • to an “insider,” which includes a “relative” (or within 90 days NOT to an “insider”)
  • while you were “insolvent”—essentially had more debts than assets
  • resulting in the sister getting more than she would in a Chapter 7 distribution of your assets  (usually just meaning more than getting nothing)

Assuming the payment meets these requirements of a preference, if your sister didn’t pay the bankruptcy trustee the demanded $3,000 the trustee would likely sue her to make her pay. Once the trustee got that $3,000, it would be divided among your creditors according to a set of “priority” rules. Your sister may receive nothing from this distribution, or likely only a small portion of the $3,000 you owed. Your effort at helping her would likely have seriously backfired.

Avoiding this Unhappy Result

You can avoid this preferential payment problem simply by not paying your sister anything during the year before filing bankruptcy. (This includes either money or anything else of value.)

Instead talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about how to best protect the $3,000 that you’ve scraped together. And then pay your sister after your bankruptcy case is filed. If you’re filing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case, that may mean a delay of only a few weeks.  

If you’ve already made the payment to your sister discuss this as soon as possible with your lawyer. If may or may not be possible to undo this payment. If so, that may solve the problem. If not, it may make sense to wait for a year to pass from time of the payment to your filing.  (Or you may need to wait only 90 days if the person you paid does not qualify as an “insider.”)  Either way, in some circumstances it may not make sense to wait. Your lawyer will help you weigh your options.

Finally, what may seem like a preferential payment may in fact not be one. For example, if instead of paying your sister you paid your ex-spouse to catch up on a child support obligation, there’s a good change that would not be a preferential payment.

So again, talk with your lawyer right away if you think you may have made a preferential payment. Or preferably do so before you pay a creditor, in order to prevent doing what may not be in your best interest.

 

“Preferences” Around the Holidays

December 3rd, 2018 at 8:00 am

Do you feel like you should pay on or pay off a certain debt now, even though you’re behind on all your debts?  It may be dangerous to do so. 

 

Last week we explained how giving a significant gift before bankruptcy could cause problems during bankruptcy. This also applies to selling something for much less than it is worth. Such a gift or sale might possibly be considered a “fraudulent transfer.”

A similar problem could arise from paying a creditor before you file bankruptcy. That’s especially true if it’s somebody you want to favor or maybe don’t even see as a regular creditor. This payment might possibly be considered a “preference,” or a “preferential payment.”  This is today’s topic.

Your Desire and Ability to Pay a Special Creditor

Especially around this time of year you may be extra motivated to pay on or pay off a special debt. A relative, or a friend, may really need of the money. He or she may be pressuring you to pay.

You might be thinking about filing bankruptcy and you don’t want it to affect this person. So you pay him or her off thinking that would help. Or you do so because you don’t want the person to know about your bankruptcy, for whatever personal reason.  

Besides wanting to, you may be able to pay on a special debt this time of year more than usual. For many people because of the expenses of the holidays money is especially tight. But, as mentioned a couple weeks ago:

The month of December is the month that people receive more income than any other month of the year. [F]or at least the past 9 years U.S. personal income was the highest in December… .

You may be getting a bonus from work or more income from working extra hours or part-time job during the holidays. So you might be able to pay a special debt now more than at any recent time.

So you may have the desire and ability to pay a debt now, before filing bankruptcy. But it may not be a smart thing to do.

What Makes a “Preference”?

If during the 365 day-period BEFORE filing a bankruptcy case you pay a creditor more than you are paying at that time to your other creditors, then AFTER your bankruptcy is filed that favored creditor could be forced to surrender to your bankruptcy trustee the money that you’d paid to this creditor earlier. See Section 547(b) and (c) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. 

This one-year look-back period is shortened to only 90 days for creditors that are not “insiders.” The Bankruptcy Code defines “insiders” basically as relatives and business associates, but the definition is open-ended. See Section 101(31). So it could include friends and just about anybody that you have a personal reason to favor. Your bankruptcy lawyer will advise you whether a potential preferential payment was to an insider or not.

Your favored creditor could be required to return the money (or other form of payment) that you’d paid. The money would usually not be given to you but to your bankruptcy trustee. The trustee would then distribute it among your creditors.

The result: instead of satisfying your favored creditor as you’d intended, you could have an unhappy one. This is not.

What’s the Point of All This?

Preference law is related to one of the most basic principles of bankruptcy—equal treatment of legally similar creditors. People or businesses which are financially hurting must be discouraged from favoring any of their creditors before filing bankruptcy. Otherwise they would—the theory goes—pay all of their last money or other resources to their favored creditors, leaving nothing for the rest of the creditors. Under preference law, if they do so within the 365-day/90-day look-back periods, those payments made to the favored creditor could be taken back from that creditor. This disincentive is supposed to make the situation fairer to all the creditors.

“Preferences” Can Be Frustrating, But They’re Avoidable

“Preferences” are relatively rare problems in consumer bankruptcy cases, partly because they are relatively easy to avoid. Next week we’ll give you a scenario showing a potentially preferential payment made during the holidays, and practical ways to avoid it.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Resolving the “Preference” Problem through Chapter 13

April 30th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Avoid the risks or persuading or negotiating with the Chapter 7 trustee by solving your preference problem through Chapter 13. 

 

Our last several blog posts have been about the problem of preference payments:

  • 3 weeks ago we introduced the problem resulting from paying a favored creditor before you file bankruptcy
  • 2 weeks ago we discussed avoiding the problem by delaying filing your case or persuading the trustee to do nothing
  • Last week was about negotiating with the trustee to pay off the preference money yourself

Today we get into how to solve this problem by filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case instead of a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” one.

When Filing a Chapter 13 Case May Be Worthwhile

A Chapter 13 case is very, very different from a Chapter 7 one. For starters, instead of taking about 4 months a Chapter 13 case almost always takes 3 to 5 YEARS.  Using it to resolve a preference is almost never a good enough reason to file a Chapter 13 case.

But Chapter 13 CAN be better than Chapter 7 in many situations. It can accomplish a lot that Chapter 7 can’t. So if you already have a good reason or two to consider a Chapter 13 case, using it to solve a preference problem as well may push you in that direction.

Let’s say you have an expensive vehicle loan that you’re a month behind on. Chapter 13 would allow you to cramdown that loan. That would reduce your monthly payments and the total you would pay. Plus you wouldn’t have to catch up on the missed payment. Yet you’re on the fence as you wonder if the disadvantages of Chapter 13 outweigh these savings. So if you have a preference problem that Chapter 13 would deal with, that could push you into deciding on Chapter 13.

When You Really Need to Use Chapter 13

The Chapter 7 solutions don’t always work:

  • You often don’t have the luxury of delaying your bankruptcy filing enough so that more than 90 days has passed after the preferential payment. (Or a full year has passed, if the payment was to an “insider” creditor)
  • The trustee may pursue your previously paid creditor in spite of your bankruptcy lawyer’s efforts to dissuade the trustee.
  • You may not have the ability to pay off the trustee yourself. Or you may owe too much to pay it off fast enough to satisfy the trustee.

So you’re looking to file bankruptcy and your lawyer advises you that none of these three are going to work. Then, if you want to avoid having a Chapter 7 trustee chasing your prior-paid creditor, consider the Chapter 13 solution.

How Does Chapter 13 Fix a Preference Problem?

Chapter 13 solves the preference problem by enabling you to pay the trustee within your payment plan. You pay enough extra money into your Chapter 13 plan to pay what you would have paid a Chapter 7 trustee. But you have significant advantages in doing it this way.

But first an example to show how this works. Assume you paid off a debt of $2,500 to your sister 60 days before filing bankruptcy. You’d gotten a tax refund and she desperately needed the money. You’d put her off for years and then had promised to pay her from the refund. Now you’re about to have your home foreclosed on so you can’t wait to file bankruptcy. If you filed a Chapter 7 case the bankruptcy trustee would force your sister to return the $2,500. She’d get sued if she didn’t. You absolutely don’t want that to happen. So you file a Chapter 13 case—which you be doing anyway to save your home. Your lawyer calculates your Chapter 13 payment plan to pay an extra $2,500 beyond what you would otherwise need to pay. You pay that extra amount over the course of your 3-to-5-year case. This may increase your monthly payment somewhat, or it may extend the length of your case. But your sister would not have to pay back anything. The trustee would have no need to even contact her.

Advantages of Using Chapter 13

1. When you file a Chapter 7 case hoping to persuade the trustee not to pursue your prior payee, you may not know if that’ll work. Or if you hope to negotiate payments to the trustee, you don’t know if that will work. The trustee may want to try to get the money out of your payee after all. Or your trustee may reject your offer in order to get the money faster from your payee. Using Chapter 13 takes away these risks. The system allows you to use your Chapter 13 plan to pay what’s needed.

2. Chapter 13 gives you much more time to pay what you need to pay. A Chapter 7 trustee’s job is liquidation. He or she is under pressure to wrap up your case quickly, and so will pressure you to pay quickly. Ask your lawyer but generally a Chapter 7 trustee won’t give you more than a year to pay up. And he or she may simply require you to pay it all in a lump sum. In contrast, under Chapter 13 you have 3 to 5 years to pay.

3. You have more control over where the money goes, and when. Chapter 13 is often used to pay creditors that you want to or need to pay. For example, if you owe a recent income tax debt or back child support, it’s much better to have those debts paid through a court-ordered Chapter 13 payment plan.

4. You have more control over when debts are paid. If you have a debt or two that needs to be paid quickly, that can often be paid first. For example, if you need to catch up on a car payment (because it doesn’t qualify for cramdown), your plan may front-load money there. The extra money you are paying because of the preference can be put to better use early in your case.

 

Debts Voluntarily Paid in Chapter 7

December 18th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 is usually much better if one of your high priorities is to favor a debt by paying it. You can do so more easily and flexibly. 

 

Our last blog post was about debts that you still pay after a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. These included debts you might WANT to pay as well as those that you are legally REQUIRED to pay.

Today we focus on debts you might want to pay for no reason other than a sense of moral or personal obligation. That is, you’re not paying in order to be allowed to keep some collateral. You’re not “reaffirming” a mortgage or vehicle loan to keep the home or vehicle. (We’ll get into “reaffirmations” next time.)

One reason we’re looking at debts paid out of personal obligation is because how different this is in Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. For reasons we’ll show, it’s legally easy to favor such a debt in Chapter 7. But it’s not practical to do so in Chapter 13.

The Myth about Not Favoring a Debt after Bankruptcy

People have many fears about filing bankruptcy that are based on myths. One myth is that they think they won’t be allowed to pay a debt that they really want to pay.

Like most persistent myths this one is based on something that’s true only in certain limited circumstances. But then people assume it applies to them when it likely doesn’t.

It’s true that in certain circumstances in bankruptcy, debts within the same legal category must be treated the same. Similarly, in a Chapter 13 payment plan all unsecured debts that are not “priority” debts are paid the same percentage.

However, after a Chapter 7 case (by far the most common type) you are completely free to pay any debt that you feel like paying. The Bankruptcy Code is very direct about this: “[n]othing… prevents a debtor from voluntarily repaying any debt.” Section 524(f) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Don’t Avoid Filing Bankruptcy Because You Want to Pay a Debt

So being concerned about wanting to pay a debt for personal reasons is not a reason to not file bankruptcy.

And it’s certainly not a reason to put off seeing a competent bankruptcy lawyer about your options. The job of your lawyer is to listen to your concerns and help you solve them. If one of your priorities is to pay a debt for whatever personal reason, your lawyer will explain your options for meeting this priority. There are usually sensible ways to meet all of your concerns.

Scenarios for Wanting to Pay a Debt

In our experience there are three basic reasons people want to pay a debt they aren’t legally required to pay.

First, they think something bad will happen—legal or personal—if they don’t pay. For example, they want to pay a doctor bill because they think the doctor otherwise won’t be willing to see them anymore. (That is often not be true, so it’s worth asking the doctor’s staff.)

Second, they don’t want the creditor to know about their bankruptcy filing. For example, they’ve borrowed from their father and don’t want him to be disappointed in them.

Third, they simply feel some kind of deep personal obligation to make good on their promise to pay. For example, they want to repay a grandmother because she really needs the money.

If you filed a Chapter 7 case, in each of these types of situations you would likely be allowed to pay that debt while paying nothing on other debts.

Easier to Pay a Personal Debt after Chapter 7

If it isn’t obvious, paying such a personal debt should be much easier after filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case. You don’t have the financial pressure of your other debts, hopefully giving you more cash flow.  So, filing a Chapter 7 case actually helps you pay a debt or two that you really want to pay.

Discharge of the Personal Debt Gives You More Flexibility

Assume that the debt you want to pay is a legally enforceable debt. (It may be a gift or not legally enforceable on some other basis.) If it is a legal debt you’ll need to list it as a debt in your Chapter 7 case. And in all likelihood it will be discharged—you will no longer owe the debt, legally speaking. The choice whether or not to pay it then becomes completely yours. Your creditor cannot legally compel you to pay it.  

This means that you can pay it as slow or as fast as you want. You can pay for a while and then decide that it wasn’t such as good idea to pay it after all. You can pay only if the creditor treats you right—whatever. It’s up to you and whatever is motivating you to pay the debt.

Realize that your creditor should be doubly impressed if you do pay the debt. Not only are you going through bankruptcy in part to be able to pay this particular debt. You are also paying it in spite of no longer having any legal obligation to do so. You might want to tell these things to your creditor to get points for being so good!

Chapter 7 vs. 13 on a Voluntary Debt

We mentioned earlier that you have to pay all regular unsecured debts the same percentage of their debts in a Chapter 13 payment plan. You can’t favor one over the others except for very limited reasons. Feeling a greater moral or personal obligation toward one debt does not count.

AFTER your Chapter 13 case is over you CAN pay anybody as much as you want. If paid everyone 10% of what you owed them, you can arrange to pay one the remaining 90%.

But that’s not very practical in most situations because a Chapter 13 case usually lasts 3 to 5 years. Most creditors aren’t going to want to wait that long to be made whole. A commitment to begin finishing paying a debt so long from now is not going to impress most people. And who knows how you’ll feel that far down the line.

That’s why Chapter 7 makes more sense if one of your high priorities is to favor one of your debts.  Of course you have to weigh that against other reasons to file a Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. This is where you really need your bankruptcy lawyer to help you sort out your priorities so that you choose the best option.

 

Using “Preference” Law to Your Advantage

April 19th, 2017 at 7:00 am

Make your bankruptcy trustee work for you by retrieving your recent payments to, or garnishments by, creditors–to your benefit.   

 

Our last 4 blog posts have been about “preferences” in bankruptcy. The last two have focused on how your trustee’s “preference” claim could cause significant problems, and how to avoid them. But you can also use “preference” law to your advantage. Today we get into how to do so.

The Big Picture

Imagine that you are under serious financial pressure, maybe thinking of filing bankruptcy, maybe trying hard to avoid doing so. Then you get threatened with a lawsuit by a debt collector if you don’t start making payments on its debt. So you somehow squeeze some precious money out of your way-overstretched budget and pay a chunk of the debt. Or instead you were sued earlier and the creditor just grabbed a big part of your paycheck or checking account. Maybe you’ve had to suffer through a number of these payments or garnishments.

Wouldn’t it be nice if, after being forced into bankruptcy anyway, you were able to get that money back? Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to put that money to better use?

Under certain circumstances bankruptcy’s preference law can accomplish this.

You actually need two sets of circumstances. First, the money paid to the creditor has to qualify as a “preference.” Second, you need to owe a particular kind of debt that you want or need to get paid.

Payment(s) Qualifying as a “Preference”

A “preference” is an extraordinary aspect of the bankruptcy system. In general, filing a bankruptcy case creates a bright line between what happened before that moment and what happens afterwards.  Between “pre-petition” events and “post-petition” ones. So, generally the assets that your bankruptcy case deals with are those in existence at the time of filing. And to a very limited extent, bankruptcy also pays attention to post-petition assets. But for most purposes what you owned before filing isn’t part of the bankruptcy picture.

However, in a few limited situations the bankruptcy system is allowed, indeed required, to look backwards from the filing date. “Preference” payments are one such situation. Under certain circumstances, payments you made, voluntarily or involuntarily, during the 90 days BEFORE filing can be undone. They are “undone” not by you but by your bankruptcy trustee.

The trustee’s job is to gather assets to distribute to creditors. If a payment a creditor received during the 90 days before filing qualifies as a “preference,” the creditor is forced to pay that money back, handing it over to the trustee. The trustee then takes that money and distributes it to your creditors under a legally prescribed priority system.

(The preference look-back period goes back a full year as to certain special creditors. Basically this includes creditors with whom you have a close personal or business relationship. But we are focusing today only on the 90-day look-back period. That’s because those are the creditors whose “preference” payments you’d more likely want undone.)

The Elements of a Preference

In order for the trustee to get back a payment you paid to the creditor in the 90 days before the bankruptcy filing that payment must meet a number of elements. Two of those elements tend to be the most important:

These two elements are often quite easy to meet.

First, “insolvent” is defined in the Bankruptcy Code (Section 101(32)) as the “financial condition such that the sum of such entity’s debts is greater than all of such entity’s property.” Most consumers contemplating bankruptcy are likely insolvent under this definition. (The biggest likely exception if for homeowners who have a meaningful amount of equity in their homes.) If your combined debts are greater than your combined assets, you meet this “insolvent” element.

The second element is even more likely met. It involves a comparison between the amount of the payment made to the creditor and the amount the creditor would have received in a bankruptcy liquidation. In most consumer bankruptcy “liquidation” cases creditors receive nothing for two reasons. First, everything or near everything the consumer owns is “exempt,” protected from bankruptcy liquidation. So there is nothing to distribute, no liquidation. Second, even if there are some assets to liquidate and distribute it all goes towards administrative costs and “priority” debts. So nothing trickles down to the creditor in question. Since the creditor would have gotten nothing in a bankruptcy liquation, the entire amount it received in payment qualifies as “preferential.”

For Example

Imagine that Creditor X garnished $1,000 out of your checking account right after you deposited your tax refund. You file bankruptcy case a month later.

You are a consumer debtor whose debts have exceeded the amount of your assets for at least the past two year. So you were insolvent at the time of the garnishment.

The assets that you do have are all covered by the property exemptions available to those filing bankruptcy within your state. Therefore Creditor X would have received nothing in a Chapter 7 distribution.

Since both of those elements are met, the full $1,000 garnishment received by Creditor X is a “preference.” Your bankruptcy trustee could require Creditor X to send that $1,000 to him or her.  If this creditor would fail to send it voluntarily, the trustee could sue to require the creditor to pay the $1,000.

The $600 Safe Haven for Creditors

There’s one last twist if your debts are “primarily consumer debts.” Then your bankruptcy trustee may not require a creditor to pay back a payment if “the aggregate value” of the payment(s) “is less than $600.” See Section 547(c)(8).

The Preference Doing You Some Good

At the beginning we referred to two things necessary for a preference to do you some good. First, the payment has to qualify as a “preference.” We’ve covered that.

And second, you need to owe a particular kind of debt that you want the trustee to pay, a debt that you’d otherwise have to pay out of your own pocket. It’s a lot better to have the trustee pay it out of money you’d already paid to another creditor, and put it to good use.

We’ll cover how this second part works in our next post (this coming Friday).

Avoiding the “Preference” Problem

April 17th, 2017 at 7:00 am

Prevent your trustee from giving you a big headache if you paid a debt to a friend or relative during the year before filing bankruptcy.  

 

In our 3 blog posts last week we explained “preferences” in bankruptcy. In particular, in our last one on Friday we showed how a “preference” claim by your trustee could cause you a significant problem. Doing something seemingly sensible before filing bankruptcy could cause trouble during your bankruptcy case. Today is about how to avoid that trouble.

Avoid the Risk of a “Preference”

A “preference” is a payment you make to one creditor in preference to your other creditors when you’re on the brink of filing bankruptcy. Specifically, it only involves payments made during the 90-day period before that filing. That period expands to the full year before filing if the creditor you pay is a friend, relative, or business associate.

Those 90-day and 1-year look-back periods are fixed, non-extendable. There is a straightforward way to take advantage of this. Just don’t pay anything you owe to a favored creditor during these periods of time. If you owe anything to a friend or relative, don’t pay them anything if there is any possibility that you’ll be filing bankruptcy in the following year. And don’t pay any other favored creditor during the 90-days before filing.

Otherwise you risk that your bankruptcy trustee will require the person you paid before filing to “return” that money to the trustee after you file bankruptcy.

The Realities of Life

There are situations that simply not paying that favored creditor is not that simple.

First, you may feel great pressure to make that payment. You owe some money to a relative who really needs you to pay some or all of it back. He or she trusted you and you feel duty-bound to show that you are trustworthy. Or your friend that you owe really needs the money now. Or you may want to pay in order to avoid including that debt in your bankruptcy case. You may not want to legally write off that debt. You may want to avoid having that friend or relative ever knowing about your anticipated bankruptcy filing. So if you are able to pay, it can be hard not to.

Second, you often don’t know whether and when you are going to file bankruptcy. Most people put it off because they understandably hope that they can avoid it. So being told to not pay a personally important debt in the one-year or 90-day periods before filing can be quite impractical advice.

Maybe sometimes, but not always. Just because you hope not to file bankruptcy, and don’t know when you will if you do, doesn’t mean you don’t know when you’re in financial trouble. If you are, be very cautious about paying a debt to a friend or relative. If you realize that doing so can cause you and the other person a major headache, you may find a better alternative.

Getting Advice

Your bankruptcy lawyer can hugely help in this. You can find out whether it is your best interest to be filing bankruptcy, now or in the near future. You can find out the best solution for dealing with your special creditor.

People understandable avoid seeing a bankruptcy lawyer until they feel that they have to file a bankruptcy case. But that is often not wise, because often the sooner you get advice the better. There are usually ways of meeting your needs that you didn’t realize. As the saying goes, knowledge is power. That’s true about your financial life in general, and in avoiding a possible “preference” as well.

Delay the Bankruptcy Filing

If you’ve already made a preferential payment, it may be worth waiting before filing bankruptcy. As mentioned above, those 90-day or 1-year look-back periods before filing your bankruptcy case are fixed. If you paid your grandmother $1,000 360 days ago when you got your tax refund, it’s usually easy enough to wait a week before filing so that payment is not within the year before filing. Then it’s not a “preference” and won’t be a problem.

If it isn’t already obvious, it’s crucial to be honest and thorough with your lawyer about any such payments you made. It’s easy to not think of debts to friends or relatives are real debts, them as real creditors. You may have paid in something other than money. Frankly, it may seem sensible to just pretend it didn’t happen.

But if you’re up-front with your lawyer there are usually solutions much better than not telling the truth. For example, most payments to creditors, including favored creditors, do NOT qualify as a preference. There are a number of elements that must be met for a payment to be legally a “preference.” See our blog post of a week ago for more about that. You may be worried about something not worth worrying about. There are many parts to your financial life and a good lawyer will help you find the best way to meet your goals.

You want to avoid creating a “preference.” Get legal advice so that you can do so and not worry about this.

 

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