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Archive for the ‘income for the means test’ tag

Scenario: Filing Chapter 13 Now Shortens a Case by Two Years

December 24th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Here’s a scenario showing how the timing of your Chapter 13 filing can shorten your payment plan from 5 years to only 3. 

 

In our last blog post we explained how your last 6 calendar months of income can determine whether your Chapter 13 payment plan lasts 3 years or instead 5 years. We showed how even relatively small shifts in the money you receive can cause this huge difference.

How this can happen will make more sense after reading through the following scenario.

Our Facts about “Income”

Remember from last time that your “income” includes money from just about all sources, except Social Security. Also, the only money that counts is that which you received during the 6 FULL CALENDAR months before filing. This means that money received DURING the calendar month of filing DOESN’T count. For example, if you file your Chapter 13 case on January 31 you count the income from the previous July 1 through December 31. You don’t count any income received in January.

In our scenario assume you worked a second job during the holidays. Your monthly paycheck for December from this job is arriving on January 4, 2019. The anticipated gross income amount is $2,500. This money could also come from just about any other source. For example, your ex-spouse may be able to catching up on some unpaid child support owed because he/she received an annual bonus. It could be from just about any source. The point is that there’s an extra $2,500 arriving in early January.

In addition you receive $3,600 gross income every month from your regular job.

You received no money from any sources other than your regular job from July 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. You expect to receive no money in January 2019 other than the $3,600 gross income and the additional $2,500.

So, assume that your bankruptcy lawyer files your Chapter 13 case between January 1 and January 31, 2019. The income that counts is what you received during the 6 prior full calendar months. That’s from July 1 through December 31, 2018. That is $3,600 per month times 6 months, or $21,600, or $43,200 for the annualized amount.

Our Facts about “Median Family Income”

Your income, as just discussed, determines whether your minimum payment plan length is 3 vs. 5 years. If your income is less than the designated “median family income,” your minimum plan length is 3 years. If your income is the same as or more than “median family income,” your minimum plan length is 5 years. Section 1322(d) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

The “median family income” amounts (Section 39A of the Bankruptcy Code) come from the U.S. Census Bureau. This source data is adjusted annually, and is also adjusted more often to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index. (The CPI comes from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.) The U.S. Trustee conveniently gathers this information at this webpage. From there the most recent median family income amounts (as of this writing) are compiled in this table.

For our scenario assume that you are single and live in Kentucky. According to the above table the median family income for a single person in Kentucky is $44,552. (You can find your own median family income by finding your state and family size in the table.)

Filing a Chapter 13 Case in January 2019

Under the facts outlined above, if you filed a Chapter 13 case during January 2019, your case could last 2 years less than if you filed the case in February, conceivably just a few days later.

Why? Because if you file in January you don’t count the income from that month. That means that you don’t count the $2,500 in income from the holiday job. You only count the $3,600 per month you received July through December from your regular job. As calculated above, that means an annualized income of $43,200. That is less than the applicable median family income amount of $44,552. So you’d be allowed to have a Chapter 13 payment plan that lasts only 3 years, and not be required to pay for 5 years.

Filing a Chapter 13 Case after January 2019

But if you file in February 2019 (or any of the following 5 months) your Chapter 13 plan would be required to last 5 years.

Why? Because if you file in February (or during the next 5 months) you do count the income from that month. That includes the $2,500 in income from the holiday job. When filing in February, for example, you count the income from August 1, 2018 through January 31, 2019. That includes the $3,600 per month from your regular job, plus the $2,500 from the holiday job. Six times $3,600 is $21,600, plus $2,500 equals $24,100. Multiply this by 2 gives you an annualized income of $48,200.

That is more than the applicable median family income amount of $44,552. So you’d be required to pay into your Chapter 13 plan for a full 5 years.

Next week we’ll discuss the financial and other consequences of this, and some other very important considerations.


Pass the Means Test by Filing Bankruptcy in 2018

November 12th, 2018 at 8:00 am

The timing of your bankruptcy filing can determine whether you qualify for quick Chapter 7 vs. paying into a Chapter 13 plan for 3-5 years.

 

Timing Can Be SO Important

There are lots of ways you could greatly benefit from meeting with a bankruptcy lawyer sooner rather than later. You may save yourself lots of money by choosing an option that would not be available to you later. 

There are many situations this could happen. Today we’ll address how filing sooner—say, before the end of 2018—might enable someone to pass the “means test” when that might not be possible later. Passing the means test means you’d likely qualify to file a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Otherwise you may be required to file a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case.

Chapter 13 can be great in the right circumstances. But you don’t want to be forced into filing one quickly because you’re desperate for immediate relief from your creditors. If you had to file a Chapter 13 case because you didn’t have the flexibility to strategically time your filing, this could easily cost you many thousands of dollars. It could mean that you couldn’t discharge most of your debts in a matter of 3-4 months without paying anything on them vs. paying on those debts for 3 to 5 years.

Timing and Income in the Means Test

The means test requires people who have the “means” to do so, to pay a meaningful amount on their debts. If you don’t pass the means test you’re effectively stuck with filing a Chapter 13 case.

Be aware that a majority of people who need a Chapter 7 case successfully pass the means test. The most direct way to do so is if your income is no larger than the published “median income” amounts designated for your state and family size. What’s crucial here is the highly unusual way the means test defines income. This unusual definition creates potential timing advantages and disadvantages.

The Means Test Definition of Income

When considering income for purposes of the means test, don’t think of income as you normally would. Instead:

1) Consider almost all sources of money coming to you in just about any form as income. Included, for example, are disability, workers’ compensation, and unemployment benefits; pension, retirement, and annuity payments received; regular contributions for household expenses by anybody, including a spouse or ex-spouse; rental or other business income; interest, dividends, and royalties. Pretty much the only money excluded are those received under the Social Security Act, including retirement, disability (SSDI), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF).

2) The period of time that counts for the means test is exactly the 6 full calendar months before your bankruptcy filing date. Included as income is ONLY the money you receive during those specific months. This excludes money received before that 6-month block of time. It also excludes any money received during the calendar month that you file your Chapter 7 case. To clarify this, if you filed a Chapter 7 case this December 15th, your income for the means test would include all money received from exactly June 1 through November 30 of this year. It would exclude money received before June 1 or received from December 1 through the date of filing.

The Effect of this Unusual Definition of Income

This timing rule means that your means test income can change depending on what month you file your case. To the extent you have flexibility over when to file, and if there are any shifts in the money you receive over time, you have some control over how much your income is for the means test when you do file your case.

So if you receive an unusual amount of money anytime in December, it doesn’t count if you file a Chapter 7 case by December 31. This unusual amount of money might be an employer’s annual bonus, a contribution from a parent or relative to help you pay expenses, or an unexpected catch-up payment of spousal/child support. Remember, if you file bankruptcy in December, only money received June through November gets counted.

Even relatively small differences in money received can make an unexpectedly big difference. That’s because the six-month income total is doubled to arrive at the annual income amount. So for example let’s say you got an extra $1,500 from whatever source(s) in December. If you file in December that extra doesn’t count, as just discussed above. But if you wait until January to file, December money is counted becasue the pertinent 6-month period is now July 1 through December 31. That extra $1,500 gets doubled, increasing your annual income by $3,000. That could push you above the designated “median income” for your state and family size. If so you’d likely not pass the means test and not qualify for Chapter 7, leaving you with Chapter 13 as your only option.

Conclusion

It is a fact that most people wait way too long before their initial consultation meeting with a bankruptcy lawyer. There are many very understandable reasons for this. But do yourself a favor and be the exception. See a lawyer not because you’re at the very end of your rope and need immediate relief from your creditors. Instead see one because you want to learn about your options. Do this sooner and you may have some significantly money-saving options that you might not have had otherwise. 

 

Chapter 7 or 13? You May Be Surprised

November 15th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 takes about 4 months, while Chapter 13 takes 3 to 5 years, and likely costs more. But that doesn’t begin to answer which is better. 

 

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13

Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” is usually, but not always, for simpler situations. It’s often the right choice if your income is relatively low, your assets are modest, and your debts are straightforward.  You keep all of your assets, all or most of your debts are discharged (legally written off), and if you want you keep paying on your vehicle and/or your mortgage or rent.

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is usually, but not always, better for somewhat more complicated situations. Your income may be too high to qualify for Chapter 7. You may have an asset or two that is not “exempt”—not protected. Or you may have debts much better handled under Chapter 13. Do you owe income taxes or student loans or a second mortgage? Are you behind on a vehicle loan, home mortgage, property tax, or child or spousal support? These and certain other kinds of debts are often handled much better in a Chapter 13 case.

Overall, these two options each have advantages and disadvantages that need to be carefully matched to you and your goals. Chapter 7 may be able to solve immediate problems and do so quickly. Chapter 13 is more expensive but that can be far outweighed by the money you save over using Chapter 7. In some situations the unique tools of Chapter 13 can save a person many thousands of dollars. Chapter 13 takes so much longer but that length can itself be an advantage. When you need or want to pay a special debt, you can stretch payments out to lower their monthly amount. So it just depends on your personal situation.

Be Flexible When You Meet with your Lawyer

You’re reading this blog post, so we’re glad that you’re working on getting informed about your options. But it’s also important to have an open mind when you go to see your bankruptcy lawyer for legal advice. If you do inform yourself in advance you may tentatively decide which option is best for you. Or you may just not know. It is easy to not be aware of a crucial advantage or disadvantage that could be decisive. So don’t be too convinced about going with one option when the other may actually be better.

Sometime Easy, Sometimes Difficult Choice

The reality is that sometimes it’s pretty clear which option is better for you. Sometimes you only qualify for one of the two. Or your circumstances can push your decision strongly towards either Chapter 7 or 13. In these situations, you may have an easy choice.

But often you qualify for both. It’s not unusual that each gives you some advantages and disadvantages that the other doesn’t. Especially in these situations it’s crucial to know all these advantages and disadvantages in order to make the best choice.  Then it comes down to a deeply personal decision based on what goals and benefits are most important to you.

To Help You Be Informed

It IS good to be as informed as you much as your time and energy allows. This choice between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 is very important. So during the next few weeks we’ll look at the differences between them.

 

Why Timing Can Be So Crucial for the Means Test

October 9th, 2017 at 7:00 am

The timing of your Chapter 7 filing—a difference of even just a day or two—can affect whether you qualify for it based on your income. 


How could filing your Chapter 7 a day or two earlier or later make such a big difference?

Usually it doesn’t. But sometimes it actually does. We’ll explain here.

The Point of the Means Test

One of the main goals behind the most recent major amendment to the bankruptcy laws in 2005 was to require more people to pay part of their debts through Chapter 13 payment plans instead of writing them off in a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” One of the main tools in the law for accomplishing this is the means test. This test uses a rigid financial test to determine who has the means to pay something to their creditors. This test is supposed to stop people from “abusing the bankruptcy system.” Those who have the means to pay a meaningful amount to their creditors in a Chapter 13 case are required to do so.

Taking Advantage of the Rigid Means Test

The means test was written rigidly to take qualifying for Chapter 7 out of the hands of bankruptcy judges. They were seen as being too soft on people filing bankruptcy.

But in real life rigid rules can have unintended consequences. An experienced and conscientious lawyer can turn these consequences to your advantage, and avoid their disadvantages. Here’s how this can play out with the means test.

What’s Rigid about the Means Test?

In our last blog post we explained the income step of the means test. That step qualifies most people because once you pass that step you pass the test. You don’t have to go any further (into your allowed expenses, for example.)

This income step essentially compares the income you received during the six FULL CALENDAR months before filing bankruptcy to a standard median income amount for your state and your family size. The question is whether your income DURING THAT PARTICULAR PERIOD is no more than the applicable median income amount. If not then you pass the means test and get to file a Chapter 7 case. (There are limited exceptions to this but they’re rare so we’re not getting into them here.)

If your income IS higher than the median amount, you may still be able to file a Chapter 7 case. But you’d have to jump through some extra hoops to do so. There’s a bigger risk that you would be forced to go through a 3-to-5-year Chapter 13 payment plan. So having your income be below the median income amount makes your case simpler and less risky.

The mean’s test is rigid in its fixation on those six prior full calendar months. Combine this with the fact that almost all money that comes into your hands during that period is counted. It’s not just taxable income. The means test includes ALL income during that precise period other than social security, tax refunds, and a few other rare exceptions. This combination of a very specific window of time plus including irregular sources of money creates opportunities to change your income for purposes of the means test.

How Can Filing a Day or Two Earlier or Later Matter So Much?

It can matter because that can change the 6-month period, which can significantly change your income for the means test.  It’s clearest to show this by example.

Imagine you received some irregular chunk of money—a few catch-up child support payments, or an insurance settlement or reimbursement.  Not a huge amount, say $2,500, received on April 10 of this year. Your only other income is from your job, with a $45,000 annual salary, or $3,750 gross per month.

Let’s say that the published median annual income amount for your state and family size is $48,000. Notice that your salary alone of $45,000 is less than applicable median income amount. Even including the $2,500 extra income—so totaling $47,500—you’d appear to have less than the median income amount.

Applying the Means Test

But that’s not the way the means test calculates income. If you were to file a Chapter 7 case in October—let’s say, on October 31, Halloween—you’d count the money received in the period from April 1 through September 30. That would be 6 months of your $3,750 salary—$22,500—plus the extra $2,500, which equals $25,000. Multiply that by two to get the annualized amount of $50,000. That’s higher than the $48,000 median amount for your family size in your state. So you’d fail the income portion of the means test, and may not be able to file a Chapter 7 case.

However, if you’d just wait to file one day until November 1 then the applicable 6-month period changes. It jumps forward by 1 full month to the new 6-month period of May 1 through October 31.  Now that new period does NOT include the $2,500 you received in April. So your income during this 6-month period is $22,500, multiplied by 2 is $45,000. Now you’re under the $48,000 median income amount. That means you’ve passed the income portion of the means test, and so you qualify for your Chapter 7 case. You can skip the expenses and other parts of the means test, avoiding the risk of failing the test.  

 

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