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Debts You Don’t List in Your Bankruptcy Case

April 1st, 2019 at 7:00 am

If you don’t list a debt in your bankruptcy case, and don’t add it in on time, it may not be written off.  So carefully include all debts. 

 

Supposed to List All Creditors 

You can’t pick and choose which debts to include in your bankruptcy case. The U.S. Bankruptcy Code says that the first duty of a bankruptcy debtor is to provide “a list of creditors.” Section 521(a)(1) of Bankruptcy Code. That list includes secured, priority, and unsecured debts, which you put on Schedules D, E and F, respectively. As these Official Forms state clearly, you must

  • “List All Secured Claims”
  • “List All of Your Priority Unsecured Claims”
  • “List All of Your Nonpriority Unsecured Claims”

In the Declarations page you declare “Under penalty of perjury” that the “schedules filed with this declaration… are true and correct.” That page includes the very stern warning that “Making a false statement … can result in fines up to $250,000, in imprisonment for up to 20 years, or both.”

Truthfully, that is an overly stern warning because penalties like that simply don’t happen in the consumer bankruptcy context. Not for not including a debt!

The point is that it’s a federal crime to intentionally lie on your bankruptcy documents. So you need to list all your debts. Talk with you bankruptcy lawyer if you believe you have a reason for not listing a debt. There’s usually a practical solution to your concerns.

Unlisted Debts Not Written Off

Today’s blog post is not so much about intentionally not listing a debt but doing so inadvertently. If somehow you don’t include a debt in your bankruptcy schedules you risk owing that debt after your case is over.

In the last 5 weeks we’ve covered the following categories of debts not written off in bankruptcy:

  • Criminal fines and restitution
  • Income taxes
  • Child and spousal support
  • Student loans
  • Damages arising from driving intoxicated

Debts “neither listed nor scheduled” in a debtor’s bankruptcy documents are another category of debts not written off. Section 523(a)(3) of the Bankruptcy Code.

If You Forgot a Debt

If you didn’t include a debt in the schedules filed by your bankruptcy lawyer, you can often add it later. But you may need to act quickly.

Figuring out your deadline to add a missing creditor is somewhat tricky. It depends on the nature of the debt and the nature of your case.

The Deadline(s) to Add a Debt

First, if the debt is of the kind that the creditor could object to the writing off of the debt based on certain bad actions by you (for example, lying about your financial situation to acquire the debt), then there is a short, strict deadline. You have to add the debt to the case in time for the creditor to have time to object.  The objection deadline is usually about 3 months after you file your case. So you’d have to add the debt a bit before that. Section 523(a)(3)(B) of the Bankruptcy Code.

Second, if your case gives the creditors the opportunity to get paid something through your bankruptcy case, you have a different deadline to add a debt. Most Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” cases don’t give most creditors the right to receive anything from the case. There are no assets to distribute to creditors (when all a debtor’s assets are “exempt,” or protected). If there ARE assets to distribute (because some asset(s) are not exempt), the bankruptcy clerk sends out a notice providing a deadline for creditors to ask for a share of the assets. Creditors do so by filing a “proof of claim” documenting their debt. So in this situation you have to add a debt a bit before that deadline. Section 523(a)(3)(A) of the Bankruptcy Code.

In Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” cases usually the debtor pays some portion of most or debts. Within a couple of weeks after you file a Chapter 13 case the clerk sends out a notice giving creditors a deadline to file proofs of claim. You have to add a debt a bit before that deadline.

Other Scenarios

What if you may owe a debt but don’t know that you may? For example, someone thinks you’ve caused them some injury or damages but hasn’t told you yet.

Or what if you’ve lost track of a debt or debts because you’ve moved and lost your records? If the debt is not on your credit report, you may have no way to recall and list the debt. Can you write off this debt?

Also, does it matter if a creditor has somehow found out about your case even though you neglected to list the debt?

Finally, what if the debt has been sold from one debt collector to another without your knowledge? How can you list a debt in order to successfully write if off if you don’t know who you owe?

We’ll cover these other scenarios next week.

 

Things You Should Know Before You File for Bankruptcy

March 29th, 2019 at 4:18 pm

bankruptcy-filingMost Americans have some form of debt — mortgages, credit card debt, student loans, auto loans, and personal loans are all part of consumer debt and most Americans have a combination of them. For many people, the debt can be handled through smart budgeting and curbed spending, but some people need to use other measures. Bankruptcy is used when people can no longer pay their debt and offers a way for those in debt to get a fresh start. The decision to file for bankruptcy is a difficult one, especially since bankruptcy laws are so complex. Here are a few things you should know before you file for bankruptcy:

There Is More Than One Kind of Bankruptcy

For individuals, there are two different types of bankruptcies — Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is the type that most people associate the word bankruptcy with. In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, most of your unsecured debts can be discharged, meaning you will no longer be responsible for paying them back. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you set up a repayment plan that allows you to repay your debts over three to five years. The kind you choose largely depends on your specific circumstances.

Bankruptcy Is Not Free

Though it may seem counterintuitive, filing for bankruptcy is not free. It can actually become quite expensive. Filing for bankruptcy can cost between a couple of hundred to a couple of thousands of dollars, depending on whether or not you hire an attorney and how much the filing fees end up costing.

Your Credit Will Be Affected

 

Once you have filed for bankruptcy and your case is finished, you will have to begin the process of rebuilding your credit. Getting a bankruptcy does make your credit score drop, but it does not really matter whether or not you go into the bankruptcy with a high or a low credit score. Most people end up around the same score range after they are done with bankruptcies.

A Kerrville, TX Bankruptcy Attorney Can Help

It can be difficult to make the decision to file for bankruptcy. Some people feel like bankruptcy is a failure, but in reality, it can be the best decision some people make. If you are thinking that bankruptcy may be right for you, you need to talk to an experienced New Braunfels, TX bankruptcy lawyer. Understanding what you are getting yourself into before you file for bankruptcy is crucial, which is why the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee are here. We can help you figure out which type of bankruptcy is right for you and the most strategic plan to benefit you. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.thesimpledollar.com/what-to-expect-when-filing-for-bankruptcy/

https://www.thebalance.com/top-things-to-know-about-bankruptcy-316198

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/pf/07/bankruptcy.asp

https://www.forbes.com/sites/larrymyler/2017/10/03/filing-for-bankruptcy-3-most-important-things-you-need-to-know/#611876127fe6

Bankruptcy Writes Off Vehicle Accident Claims, Unless Intoxicated

March 25th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy writes off claims against you from a vehicle accident for personal injuries and property damage, IF you weren’t intoxicated. 

 

Vehicle Accident Claims

If you had a vehicle accident, you could owe many kinds of debts from it.  You could be liable for any injured party’s current and future medical bills, loss of wages, pain and suffering, and other forms of damages. You could owe for property damage to vehicles and also to any building or traffic barriers or signs.

Your insurance may cover all of these obligations. Of course if you have no insurance, it’s all on you. More likely you have insurance but not enough. Especially if you have only the legal minimum coverage, a major accident and/or one with multiple vehicles could easily result in damages more than your insurance limits.  Then you’d be on the hook for everything insurance doesn’t cover. That could amount to tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.  

Bankruptcy would usually write off (“discharge”) whatever you’d owe.

Accident Claims of Unknown Amounts

It doesn’t matter if you don’t know how much you’ll owe. Often you don’t until many months or sometimes even years after the accident. As long as you file bankruptcy after the accident, all claims from the accident are covered by your bankruptcy case.  

Bankruptcy law makes that clear.

Bankruptcy discharges most debts. The U.S. Bankruptcy Code defines a “debt” as a “liability on a claim.”  In other words, you have some legal obligation to somebody.

But that legal obligation does not need to be reduced to a fixed dollar amount. A “claim” is defined as a “right to payment, whether or not… liquidated, unliquidated, fixed, contingent, matured, unmatured, disputed, undisputed… 

“Unliquidated” means that the amount of the claim is unknown. For example, medical expenses are still accruing. “Contingent” means that the event that triggers whether or not you are liable has not yet happened. For example, a dispute about whether somebody else’s insurance covers the claim has not yet been resolved. “Disputed” means that a question remains whether the claim against you is legally valid. For example, the cause of the accident is still being litigated.

In all these non-fixed-debt situations, bankruptcy would still usually discharge any debts related to claims arising out of the accident.

The Intoxication Exception

However, bankruptcy does not write off accident claims if you were driving intoxicated.

Specifically, regular Chapter 7 bankruptcy “does not discharge an individual debtor from any debt… for death or personal injury caused by the debtor’s operation of a motor vehicle… if such operation was unlawful because the debtor was intoxicated from using alcohol, a drug, or another substance.” Section 523(a)(9) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

This applies just as much to Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” because it incorporates the same language. Section 1328(a)(2) of Bankruptcy Code.

3 Practical Twists

1) Only Applies to Unlawful Operation

Notice that this exception only applies if your alleged intoxication made your “operation of a motor vehicle… unlawful.” So this raises some questions if you were arguably intoxicated but weren’t so charged. Your bankruptcy lawyer could argue your operation of your vehicle was not “unlawful.” So the resulting accident claims should be written off in bankruptcy.

On the other hand, there may be circumstances in which a person isn’t charged but was still intoxicated under the law. The accident may have happened in an isolated place and the police didn’t arrive until hours later. Even if you weren’t cited, the injured party could still try to bring evidence that you were driving unlawfully. For example, there could be convincing evidence based on how much you drank and when.

2) Property Damage

The Bankruptcy Code language that creates this exception to discharge refers only to debts “for death or personal injury.” This language does not cover property damage. So can you discharge property damage debts from an intoxicated accident?

Maybe. But there is another exception to discharge that does apply to property damages. Bankruptcy law excludes from discharge any debt “for willful and malicious injury by the debtor to another entity or to the property of another entity.” Section 523(a)(6) of the Bankruptcy Code.

But if you have an accident while intoxicated the injuries caused weren’t intentional. So they weren’t willful, right?

It may depend on your specific facts, and especially on how the bankruptcy courts interpret the law locally. Bankruptcy is federal law but on close questions could be applied differently in different regions of the country. If you have any debts from any accident make sure you have a particularly experienced bankruptcy lawyer representing you. He or she will advise you about the law in your bankruptcy court.

3) Boating and Flying Accidents

We’ve been discussing driving while intoxicated but the discharge exception also applies to intoxicated boating and flying.

Bankruptcy does not “discharge an individual debtor from any debt. .. for death or personal injury caused by the debtor’s operation of a… vessel, or aircraft… if such operation was unlawful because the debtor was intoxicated from using alcohol, a drug, or another substance.”

Boating and flying are covered by completely different laws, so what’s unlawful is completely different. In state boating laws the blood alcohol concentration amounts may be different, as well of the effect of the operator’s age. Under federal aviation law it is illegal to operate an aircraft:

  • “within 8 hours after the consumption of any alcoholic beverage”
  • with “an alcohol concentration of 0.04% or or greater in a blood or breath specimen”
  • “while using any drug that affects the person’s faculties in any way contrary to safety”

Code of Federal Regulations, Title 14, Section 91.17

 

Bankruptcy Can Write Off a Student Loan, IF it Causes Undue Hardship

March 18th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Writing off student loans is not easy. You must convincingly show that paying the loan causes you undue hardship, a tough condition to prove. 

 

 

Criminal fines and restitution and child and spousal support are types of debts that bankruptcy essentially never discharges. Income taxes can be discharged but only after meeting certain conditions. We’ve covered these in our last few blog posts. Today we cover student loans.

Student loans are more like income taxes than criminal or support debts in that they CAN get discharged in bankruptcy. Like an income tax, a student loan just needs to meet certain conditions.

But unlike an income tax debt, the conditions for discharge of a student loan are much vaguer. Most of the income tax conditions are clear. These conditions require a precise understanding of the law and a thorough knowledge of the facts of your case. But if you and your bankruptcy lawyer are careful, you should know before you file your bankruptcy whether you can discharge a tax debt.

Discharging student loans, in contrast, require meeting an ambiguous condition called “undue hardship.” Its ambiguity means that it’s much harder to predict whether or not a student loan will be discharged in bankruptcy.

Furthermore, because of this vague condition it’s possible to get a partial discharge. You may continue to owe some but not all of a particular student loan debt. Or if you have multiple student loans you may discharge some but not all of them.

“Undue Hardship”

Bankruptcy law states that an educational loan or benefit overpayment is not discharged in bankruptcy unless it “would impose an undue hardship on [you or your] dependents.” Section 523(a)(8) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Can you show the bankruptcy court that paying a student loan causes you “undue hardship”? If so bankruptcy can forever discharge that debt.

A More Precise Meaning of “Undue Hardship”

How does your bankruptcy court decide whether or not a student loan causes you a hardship?  

How bad does a hardship need to be to qualify as an undue hardship?

In most parts of the country “undue hardship” requires you to establish all three of the following:

1. You currently cannot maintain even a minimal standard of living (for yourself and any dependents) if you pay the student loan.

2. This present financial situation is realistically anticipated to continue through the loan’s term of repayment.

3. You have acted responsibly in the past regarding the student loan, by making a serious effort to pay it and/or to attempt to qualify for any of the available programs to reduce or manage the loan.  

The Student Loan Survives Unless You Establish “Undue Hardship”

It can be difficult to meet all three of these. If you don’t, you continue to owe the student loan.

Furthermore, the student loan creditor does not have to take any action itself. You and your lawyer have to raise the issue yourself. It’s up to you to start the ball rolling.

Generally you do so by filing an “adversary proceeding” during your bankruptcy case. This is a legal proceeding focusing exclusively on whether you qualify for a “hardship discharge” of the student loan.

If you believe you qualify, you could file a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Then your lawyer would file an adversary proceeding during the 3-4 months a basic Chapter 7 case usually lasts.  The student loan creditor would most likely object. There would then be a trial with evidence on whether you meet the necessary factors to show undue hardship. There’s no jury—the bankruptcy judge decides.

You can do the same thing within a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.” Because this kind of bankruptcy usually lasts 3 to 5 years, it gives you more timing options. Chapter 13 would usually allow you to avoid making student loan payments at least temporarily. Then once you think you qualify for undue hardship your lawyer would file the adversary proceeding. This could be especially helpful if you have a deteriorating medical condition or an anticipated reduction in income.

Summary

Student loans are dischargeable in bankruptcy, but undue hardship is an ambiguous and often tough condition to prove. The law of undue hardship as interpreted by the courts is constantly adjusting, and can be slightly different in different bankruptcy courts. So it’s crucial to get highly competent legal advice about what’s best for you.

 

Exploring Federal and Texas Bankruptcy Exemptions

March 15th, 2019 at 4:27 pm

TX bankruptcy attorneyFor some people, filing for bankruptcy can be a scary thing. In the beginning, you may not know what the future has in store for you and you may wonder which of your possessions you are allowed to keep and which possessions you must give up. Exemptions are an important part of the bankruptcy process. In a bankruptcy case, exemptions are the possessions that you get to keep after you have liquidated your luxury assets to help pay back a portion of your debts. Each state has its own guidelines for what property is exempt during a bankruptcy. In 17 states, including the state of Texas, you are able to choose between state exemption guidelines or federal guidelines, but you must choose one or the other. It is important to understand bankruptcy exemptions because they do differ.

Federal Exemptions

The exemptions that are listed here are the exemption amounts for each individual bankruptcy filer. That means if both you and your spouse are filing for bankruptcy, you can double the amounts. Here is a list of the current federal exemption amounts for each individual filer:

  • Homestead Exemption: Up to $22,675 in equity for a primary residence;
  • Motor Vehicle: $3,775 for one vehicle per filer;
  • Jewelry: Up to $1,600 in jewelry, not including wedding rings;
  • Household Goods: A total of $12,625, but with no item valued more than $600 can be exempted. Household goods include clothing, furniture, appliances, linens, kitchenware, and personal effects;
  • Tools of the Trade: Up to $2,375 for items you use for work;
  • Domestic Maintenance: An amount reasonably necessary for support
  • Social Security, Unemployment, Veteran’s Benefits, Public Assistance, Disability: Exempt without regard to the value;
  • Personal Injury Awards: Up to $23,675, not including pain and suffering or actual pecuniary damages or loss of future earning capacity;
  • Retirement Accounts: Tax exempt retirement accounts are exempt, but IRAs and Roth IRAs are capped at $1,283,025; and
  • Wildcard Exemption: You may also exempt up to $1,250 of any property, plus $11,850 of any unused homestead exemption.

Texas Exemptions

The state exemptions in Texas are slightly different than the federal exemptions. Here is a list of exemptions you receive if you choose to follow state bankruptcy exemptions, rather than federal exemptions:

  • Homestead Exemption: You are permitted to exempt equity in your primary residence as long as that residence does not span more than 10 acres in a city, town or village, or 100 acres elsewhere;
  • Personal Property: If you are single, you can exempt personal property up to $50,000 in value. If you have a spouse, you are permitted to exempt up to $100,000 in personal property;
  • Motor Vehicle: You are allowed to exempt one motor vehicle per household member who has a driver’s license;
  • Pensions and Retirement Accounts: Most tax-exempt pensions and retirement accounts are exempt under Texas law. These can include government employee pensions and retirement accounts, IRAs and Roth IRAs, teacher’s retirement and pension benefits and law enforcement pension and retirement benefits.

Contact a New Braunfels, TX Bankruptcy Attorney Today

Many people who decide to file for bankruptcy do so because it is their last option for debt relief. While filing for bankruptcy can cause you to have to liquidate some of your non-necessary assets, you will not lose everything. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we understand that filing for bankruptcy can be a hard decision, but we can help you throughout the entire process. Our skilled Boerne bankruptcy lawyers can help you understand the difference between federal and Texas state exemptions and choose the exemptions that would best benefit you. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/11/522

https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/PR/pdf/PR.41.pdf

https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/PR/pdf/PR.42.pdf

Bankruptcy Does Not Write Off Child or Spousal Support Debts

March 11th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Child support and spousal support debts cannot get written off in bankruptcy. But is your specific divorce debt legally considered support? 

 

We’re in a series of blog posts about special kinds of debt which bankruptcy may not discharge—write off.  So far we’ve covered criminal fines and restitution, and income taxes.

Child and spousal support are more like criminal debts than like income taxes. Bankruptcy simply does not discharge a criminal debt, as long as it really is a criminal, not civil, obligation.  Bankruptcy does discharge income tax debts that meet certain conditions. Bankruptcy simply does not discharge child and spousal support, IF it fits bankruptcy’s definition of support.

No Discharge of Support

Bankruptcy law is clear that neither Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” nor Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” discharges support debts.

Section 523 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code lists the “Exceptions to discharge.” It includes that “A discharge under [Chapter 7] does not discharge an individual debtor from any debt—(5) for a domestic support obligation… “ Section 523(a)(5).

Chapter 13 says the same thing by incorporating this Chapter 7 exception to discharge in its own list of exceptions.  Section 1328(a)(2).

What’s Considered Support in Bankruptcy?

So if you owe a “domestic support obligation,” you’re not getting out of it through bankruptcy. But what does that phrase mean? What does it include and what might if not include?

The Bankruptcy Code’s definition of “domestic support obligation” is 221 words long, containing 10 clauses. Section 101(14) of the Bankruptcy Code.  It appears to be a broad definition, covering anything that would sensibly be considered child or spousal support. For example, the debt could be owed not just to your ex-spouse or your child, but also to a current spouse (through a separation agreement) or to the parent, legal guardian, or responsible relative of a child (based on a court order of support, even if not biologically your child). In other circumstances, to be considered support the debt does not necessarily need to be based on a court order. It can be based on a separation agreement or “a determination made in accordance with applicable nonbankruptcy law by a governmental unit.”

Yet there are some limitations. For example, support obligations are often assigned for collection to someone other than the ex-spouse or child. Usually it’s assigned to a state or county support enforcement agency—then it’s still considered support. However, a support obligation that was “assigned to a nongovernmental entity” for collection is no longer considered support in bankruptcy. That is, it isn’t “unless that obligation [was] assigned voluntarily by the spouse, former spouse, child of the debtor, or such child’s parent, legal guardian, or responsible relative for the purpose of collecting the debt.” Section 101(14)(D).

Obligations “In the Nature of” Child or Spousal Support

Sometimes a domestic relations court will call something support that really isn’t.  The bankruptcy court does not have to accept what your divorce court labeled as support.

The definition of a “domestic support obligation” (that is, support) includes the requirement that it really be “in the nature of alimony, maintenance, or support” on behalf of the pertinent person. Section 101(14)(B). If it’s not, the debt may be dischargeable.

“Support” That Might Be Dischargeable in Bankruptcy

For example, a debt that’s labeled as support might not really be “in the nature” of support if it’s actually a “property settlement” obligation that’s mislabeled as spousal or child support.

A property settlement obligation involves the resolution of a marital asset or debt. For example, you may owe money to your ex-spouse in return for receiving more than your share of marital assets. Or you may owe in return for your ex-spouse taking on what had been a joint debt. If a divorce judge requires you to pay “support” for what is really a property settlement, it may be discharged in bankruptcy.

The Difference This Can Make

Chapter 7 discharges neither support nor property settlement debts.  But Chapter 13 can discharge property settlement debts.

So if you have obligations called “support” but which are not “in the nature of support,” a Chapter 13 is worth looking into. Chapter 13 may especially be worthwhile if the debt at issue  is large.

Conclusion

If you owe a debt labeled as support by your divorce court, most of the time it will indeed be “in the nature of” support. But not always.

You can see that the interplay between divorce law and bankruptcy can get complicated. Talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about all of your divorce obligations to get all the relief you’re entitled to.

 

Bankruptcy Writes Off (Some) Income Taxes

March 4th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy permanently writes off income taxes, as long as the tax meets certain conditions. For some taxes the conditions are easy to meet. 

 

Bankruptcy DOES Write Off Income Taxes

There are certain very special debts that bankruptcy never writes off. Child and spousal support is a good example. See Sections 523(a)(5) and 101(14A) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Income taxes are different. Income taxes CAN be written off, as long as you meet a few conditions. These conditions mostly tie in to timing—when the tax was due and when (and whether) you filed its tax return.

The Two Timing Conditions

In most people meeting these conditions is straightforward. You essentially have to file your tax returns and wait long enough to comply with for the following two conditions:

  1. You submitted the pertinent tax return to the IRS/state and did so more than 2 years before filing your bankruptcy case. Section 523(a)(1)(B)(ii) of the Bankruptcy Code.
  2. The legal due date for that tax return was more than 3 years before filing your bankruptcy case. Section 507(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code.

For example, assume you owe the IRS $5,000 for the 2014 tax year, and you submitted its tax return a full year late—in April 2016. It’s been more than 2 years since that so you meet the first condition. The legal due date for that tax return was in April 2015, which is more than 3 years ago. So you also meet the second condition. So in most situations bankruptcy would write off that 2014 income tax debt of $5,000.

A Few Important Twists about the Timing

Keep three practical considerations in mind about these two time periods:

  1. The 3-year period only starts to run when the tax return was “last due, including extensions.” Section 523(a)(1)(B)(ii). The 3 years only begins at the extended due date. It’s absolutely crucial that your bankruptcy lawyer gets the correct information from you about whether you got an extension that year.
  2. If you’re cutting it close (because you’re in a big hurry to file), the precise tax return due date can be crucial. Remember that taxes are not always due on April 15 and October 15 (for extensions). Weekends and holidays can push the due date out even several days. That means you may have to wait some extra days to file your bankruptcy case to be able to write off that tax debt.
  3. Careful about making a mistake about whether and when you actually submitted your tax return. It may be worth finding out directly from the IRS/state to avoid getting a rude surprise after filing your bankruptcy case.

Other Uncommon Conditions

There are two other conditions that might possibly apply, in more complicated situations.

  1. More than 240 days must pass from when the IRS/state assessed the income tax to when filing your bankruptcy case. Assessment usually happens within a few weeks after you get your tax returns in to the IRS/state. So usually this condition is easily met. It only tends to apply if assessment gets delayed with a tax audit, litigation in Tax Court, a tax appeal, offer in compromise, and other complications.
  2. Regardless of all these timing rules, you can never write off an income tax based on a fraudulent tax return or if you intentionally evade a tax. This is uncommon. It tends to only come up if you were significantly dishonest with the tax authorities.

Conclusion

In most situations you can write off the tax if you filed your pertinent tax return and both the 2-year and 3-year periods have passed. But the intersection between bankruptcy and income taxes is definitely complicated. Be sure to see a competent bankruptcy lawyer if you owe taxes so that you get the full benefit of the law.

 

Criminal Fines and Restitution Not Written Off in Bankruptcy

February 25th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy does not write off criminal fines or restitution. But it can help by writing off other debts so you can pay crucial expenses.

 

If you owe criminal fines, penalties, forfeiture, or restitution, bankruptcy does not help you directly with those debts. But bankruptcy can still provide you essential help in paying for essential expenses, including criminal related ones.

The Criminal Fines and Restitution Exception

Neither Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” nor Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” writes off criminal fines, penalties, forfeiture, or restitution.

Under Chapter 7 any “fine, penalty, or forfeiture” owed to “a governmental unit” is excluded from discharge (bankruptcy write-off). Section 523(a)(7) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

(The only exceptions are if the debt is “compensation for actual pecuniary loss” or certain tax penalties. These are narrow exceptions that are beyond what this blog post covers.)

Criminal restitution is also not written off in Chapter 7. Excluded are debts “for any payment of an order of restitution issued under title 18, United States Code.” Title 18 is the main criminal code for the federal government. Courts have extended this to include state criminal restitution as well.

Chapter 13 excludes from write off “any debt… for restitution, or a criminal fine, included in a sentence on the debtor’s conviction of a crime.”  Section 1328(a)(3) of the Bankruptcy Code.  (In the past Chapter 13 did allow some criminal debts to be written off. But about 25 years ago Congress changed the law.)

Bankruptcy May Still Provide Crucial Help

Even if filing bankruptcy would not write off your criminal debt(s), doing so may still be very worthwhile. Bankruptcy may in fact be an indispensable tool for dealing with your situation. If you’ve been criminally charged, here are two ways filing bankruptcy could significantly help.

1) Write Off Your Other Debts

If you’ve been charged with a serious crime you need to intensely focus your financial resources to deal with it. You need to fixate on how to pay for your defense—for an experienced criminal attorney and other related costs. If you’re like most people, you’ll need to consider whether to stop paying many or even all of your debts.

Often the best way to eliminate or greatly reduce your debt payments is by filing bankruptcy. Doing so allows you to immediately stop paying many or most of your debts.

If your criminal case has already finished, bankruptcy can also be extremely effective. You presumably have financial obligations to the criminal justice system that you absolutely must pay. These obligations may include criminal fines, restitution payments, probation or supervision fees, treatment costs, community service fees, and/or drug and electronic monitoring charges. If you don’t pay these the consequences can be catastrophic, including incarceration and other harsh penalties.  Writing off your other debts through bankruptcy can enable you to pay your court-required obligations.

2) Deal with Related Non-Criminal Liability

If the criminal allegations against you involve a victim, you may end up owing that person a debt. This debt would—unlike the criminal debts owed to the court—likely be civil damages that you may be able to write off in bankruptcy.

The truth is that there are other exceptions that may prevent you from writing off even civil damages. However, your filing of bankruptcy may persuade that person not to sue you. Or, if you’ve already been sued, it could lead to a better settlement for you.

That’s because:

  • You disclose the details of your financial distress in your bankruptcy documents, under oath. That may well quickly and convincingly show your adversary that pursuing you is not financially worthwhile.
  • Even if a civil claim against you might not be discharged in bankruptcy, it might be. You are putting up another hurdle for your adversary. He or she has to seriously consider whether it’s worth more money, time, and emotional effort to pursue you.
  • Filing bankruptcy can sometimes speed up the litigation process. Bankruptcy court litigation tends to be more streamlined and efficient than in state court, often much more so. Faster procedures lead to a quicker settlement or court decision. That saves you money, potentially a lot of money.
  • Almost always your adversary has to act very quickly to preserve the claim. If he or she fails to act, the civil claim will simply be written off.

 

How Will a Bankruptcy Affect My Credit Score?

February 22nd, 2019 at 3:47 pm

TX bankrtupcy lawyerOne of the biggest worries people have when they go to file for bankruptcy is what that will mean for their credit score. There is a lot of confusion surrounding bankruptcies and how they affect your credit. While it is true that they do negatively impact your credit score, it is not nearly as bad as some have let people believe. There is no one answer to how your bankruptcy will affect your credit score. It is a combination of what your credit score was before your bankruptcy and what appears on your credit report. Each situation is different and it is nearly impossible to say how a bankruptcy will affect your credit score.

Effects on Your Credit Score

While there is no simple way to tell how a bankruptcy will affect your credit score, FICO, one of the nation’s leading credit reporting bureaus, has released information on how bankruptcy and other credit mistakes could affect your score. According to FICO, those with higher credit scores before bankruptcy typically lose more points after a bankruptcy, while those with lower credit scores lose fewer points. Despite the difference in the number of points that the score drops, both people with high and low credit scores will have credit scores that end up in the same vicinity.

How Long Bankruptcies Stay on Your Credit Report

Much of the impact bankruptcy has on your credit score is determined by how long it will be on your credit report. The length of time in which the bankruptcy will be on your credit report varies depending on the type of bankruptcy you file. For example, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy will appear on your credit report for up to seven years and your discharged debts will also stay on your report for up to seven years after they are discharged. In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the bankruptcy will appear on your report for up to 10 years, though the discharged debts will drop off the report after about seven years.

Worried About Your Credit Score? Contact a New Braunfels, TX Bankruptcy Attorney

For most people bankruptcy is (and should be) a last resort. If you have tried other debt and credit counseling options and nothing has changed, then you may need to talk to a skilled Boerne bankruptcy lawyer. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we have extensive knowledge of U.S. bankruptcy law and we also have more than 20 years of experience with helping clients get a clean slate. We can walk you through the bankruptcy process from start to finish and we can help you set yourself up for success after your bankruptcy is completed. Contact our office today by calling 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.moneycrashers.com/bankruptcy-affect-credit-score/

https://www.thebalance.com/how-much-will-bankruptcy-hurt-your-credit-score-960061

Debts Not Written Off in Bankruptcy

February 18th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Most debts get written off—discharged—in bankruptcy. The only ones that aren’t are specifically listed in the Bankruptcy Code. 

 

Debts Covered by the Discharge

The basic rule is that all your debts get discharged in bankruptcy unless a particular debt fits a listed exception.

Focusing on Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy,” you will likely receive an Order of Discharge within about 4 months of filing the case. The heart of this court order simply states that “A discharge…  is granted to [the debtor].”

So what are the listed exceptions—what debts are NOT discharged through the Order of Discharge?

Exceptions to Discharge

 Section 523 of the Bankruptcy Code covers “Exceptions to discharge.” There are two categories of exceptions:

1) debts which will still be discharged unless the creditor objects and prevails in that objection, and

2) debts which do not require objection by a creditor.

1) Debts Requiring Successful Creditor Objection

In this first category, “the debtor shall be discharged for [the] debt of a kind specified” “unless, on request of the creditor… , the [bankruptcy] court determines such debt to be excepted from discharge… .” Section 523(c)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code.

In other words, these kinds of debts DO get discharged unless ALL of the following are true:

  • the debt is “of a kind specified”
  • the creditor  requests a court determination
  • the court determines in favor of the creditor that the debt should be “excepted from discharge”

There are 3 kinds of debts of this sort in which a creditor can ask for a court determination about discharge of the debt:

  1. Fraud Debts: incurred when a debtor makes a misrepresentation or commits fraud to get a loan or credit. Section 523(a)(2).
  2. Theft, Embezzlement, Fraud in a Trust Relationship: stealing from anyone, such as an employer or business partner, and especially from someone in a fiduciary relationship. 523(a)(4).
  3. Willful and Malicious Injury: intentionally and maliciously harming a person or business, and/or property. 523(a)(6).

Timely and Successful Objection

How does a creditor ask for a court determination that a debt falls within one of these 3 kinds? It files a formal “adversary proceeding”—a type of limited lawsuit—in the bankruptcy court. It has to file this within a strict deadline—usually within 60 days after a scheduled meeting of creditors. If the creditor received appropriate notice of the bankruptcy case but doesn’t object by this deadline, the debt is discharged forever.

And if a creditor does timely object, how does the bankruptcy court decide whether a debt should get discharged? Unlike most lawsuits on a debt, the court does NOT need to determine whether the debtor owes the debt. THAT’s generally assumed. Rather the question is whether the facts support the narrow grounds of fraud and such which make the debt not dischargeable. If the creditor cannot prove the necessary facts, the debt will still be discharged.

2) Debts Not Requiring Creditor Objection

The kinds of debts that are discharged unless a creditor objects generally involve some bad action by a debtor towards the creditor. The general idea is that if a creditor cares about being wronged it will raise an objection to the discharge.

But in a second category of not-discharged debts the creditors do not need to object. That’s because the kinds of debts in this category are not dischargeable simply because of the nature of the debt. There doesn’t need to be a court determination. It’s usually quite straightforward whether or not the debt belongs to these nondischargeable types of debt.

Here’s a list of debts that don’t get discharged even without creditor objection:

  1. Criminal fines, fees, and restitution
  2. Income taxes, and other forms of taxes, under certain conditions
  3. Child and spousal support
  4. Student loans that don’t cause an “undue hardship”
  5. Claims for bodily injury or death from driving while intoxicated
  6. Debts not listed in your bankruptcy schedules, under certain conditions

There ARE occasionally questions about whether the debt at issue fits the not-discharged definition. But it’s usually clear whether a debt is, for example, a criminal fine or child support. Our next 6 blog posts will go through each of these types, focusing on situations where there may be some ambiguity.

Note: Today’s blog post was about the discharge of debts in a Chapter 7 case. The debts discharged in a Chapter 13 case are slightly broader. We’ll address the difference in an upcoming blog post.  

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