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Chapter 13 Benefits Directly Related to Real Estate Other than Your Home

June 17th, 2016 at 7:00 am

Chapter 13 can be an effective way to keep or unload business and investment real estate.

 

Our last blog was about selling real estate that is not your home within a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case. We showed how this would give you more control over the timing and other important circumstances of the sale than if you just surrendered the real estate through a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.”

But Chapter 13 may provide other benefits to consider.

Some of those benefits are related to the real estate itself. We’ll cover those today and in our next blog post.

Benefits under Chapter 13 Related to the Real Estate
—Control over Keeping or Selling

When you file a Chapter 7 case you hand over total discretion about that decision to the bankruptcy trustee. He or she chooses whether to take possession and control over the property, whether to sell it, and all the circumstances of that sale. The guiding principle for the trustee’s decision is whether your creditors will benefit, with essentially no consideration for your interests.  

Under Chapter 13 you have at least some say about what to do with the real estate. For example, if you believe that with some “sweat equity”—repairs done through your efforts plus a modest amount of money—you could increase the equity in the property and thereby pay more than you would otherwise to your most important creditors, you’d have to opportunity to make your case about this.

You do have to justify what you propose to do with the real estate, and so your discretion is definitely limited. For example, if want to keep your real estate but it has no equity, requires monthly payments on a mortgage, and produces no financial benefit, you’re going to have a tough time justifying keeping that real estate. Keeping the real estate has to be part of a sensible financial plan.

—Surrendering Undesirable Property

This loss of decision-making includes your likely inability to get rid of real estate that you want to be rid of. It’s not unusual to have real estate that is a significant burden to you. For example, you may very much want to get out from under a rental home where the last tenants manufactured “meth,” with the result that the clean-up costs are prohibitively expensive. Your mortgage holder is not foreclosing, so you file a Chapter 7 case thinking that the bankruptcy trustee gets the property out of your hands. Not necessarily.

The Chapter 7 case may well discharge (legally write off) your mortgage debt, along with all or most of your other debts. But the Chapter 7 trustee would very likely choose to “abandon” the real estate back to you on the grounds that it is “burdensome” or “of inconsequential value and benefit” to your creditors. See Section 554(a) of the Bankruptcy Code.

So you’d still be saddled with the real estate after your Chapter 7 would be over, probably continuing to incur new debts for property taxes, potentially for homeowner association dues and assessments, city fines, and such.

Under Chapter 13 you may be able to be more proactive with such property. You may be in a stronger negotiating posture with the mortgage lender to induce it to accept its losses and foreclose on the property. The bankruptcy court may help with this since that one creditor is potentially harming your ability to pay the other creditors. At the very least you would have the power to convert the Chapter 13 case into a Chapter 7 one once the foreclosure occurred, allowing you to discharge the debts on the property that accrued in the meantime.

 

(Our next blog post in a couple days will have more about how Chapter 13 can help you temporarily or permanently retain and build your equity in business and investment real estate, and your income from it.)

 

Written by Staff Writer

June 17th, 2016 at 7:00 am

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