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Bankruptcy Helps You Afford Your Mortgage

July 22nd, 2019 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy frees up cash flow for your mortgage payments. Chapter 7 does so by writing off other debts. Chapter 13 does so more creatively. 


 

Both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Improve Your Cash Flow

A Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case would very likely quickly write off (“discharge”) many of your debts. For many people it discharges most of their debts, maybe even all of them except their home mortgage. That frees up cash flow so that you can better afford to pay your mortgage.

A Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case is different but has a similar result. It would very likely reduce payments on most or all of your non-mortgage debts. The amount you pay monthly on your debts is often radically reduced. Plus Chapter 13 deals much better with a variety of dangerous debts. The end result is also to free up cash flow so that you can better afford to pay your mortgage.

Let’s take a closer look at these two options.

Chapter 7 Helps You Pay Your Mortgage

Are you current or almost current on your home mortgage, but only because you are not making required payments on some of your other debts? And/or are you not spending what you reasonably should be on expenses such as food, clothing, or doctor/dental visits?

Chapter 7 legally allows you to immediately stop paying most of your debts. This is accomplished through the “automatic stay,” which stops virtually all collection activity against you. (Section 362 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.)

Then, under Chapter 7 the bankruptcy court discharges these debts 3 to 4 months after you file your case. (Section 727 of the Bankruptcy Code.)

So if you’ve been struggling to pay your mortgage, Chapter 7 gives you huge relief. You immediately don’t have to pay some or all of other debts that you’ve been paying. So you can better afford to pay your home mortgage.

If you’ve not been paying creditors you should have been, Chapter 7 stops them from coming after you later.  This prevents them from suing you and garnishing your wages, taking away your ability to pay your mortgage later. So you get long-term relief.

Also, you can better afford to pay essential home obligations, like your property taxes and homeowner’s insurance. If you are behind on either of these, Chapter 7 helps with this immediately and long-term.

Chapter 13 Helps You Pay Your Mortgage, Helping Both Less and More

A Chapter 13 case may help your cash flow differently than Chapter 7. Usually you do continue paying something to all your creditors (although not always). However, if you have certain special debts, Chapter 13 helps your cash flow much more than Chapter 7.

Chapter 13 also helps more than Chapter 7 if you are behind on or struggling to pay your mortgage, your homeowner’s insurance, or the property taxes.

Let’s look separately at these two ways Chapter 13 help more than Chapter 7.

Chapter 13 Helps Your Cash Flow More if You Have Certain Kinds of Debts

Chapter 7 does not discharge all debts. Back child and spousal support, other divorce-related debts, recent income taxes, and student loans usually are not discharged. If you owe any of those, you will have to continue paying them. In the case of child/spousal support, the filing a Chapter 7 case does not stop its collection at all. (Section 362(b)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code.) With the other debts, collection against you can resume 3-4  months later when the case is completed. (Section 362(c)(2).)

In contrast, filing a Chapter 13 case does stop the collection of these “nondischargeable” debts. As with Chapter 7, the “automatic stay” protection against collection ends when the Chapter 13 case is finished. But with a successful Chapter 13 case that usually doesn’t happen for 3 to 5 years.

More importantly, Chapter 13 provides a great way for you to pay these special kinds of debts in the meantime. You do so based on a reasonable budget, while being protected from all of your creditors. So when your Chapter 13 payment plan is finished, you have paid off or brought current your nondischargeable debts. You no longer need the “automatic stay” protection.

By forcing these special creditors to accept payments based on your budget, you protect your ability to pay your mortgage. 

Chapter 13 Helps You Catch up on Your Home Mortgage, Insurance, and Taxes

If you are behind on your mortgage payments, Chapter 13 provides one of the best ways possible to catch up. You have 3 to 5 years to catch up. You do have to continue/resume making your ongoing monthly mortgage payments. The arrearage catch-up payments are incorporated into your single monthly Chapter 13 plan payment. As mentioned above, that plan payment amount is based on your reasonable budget. Other more urgent obligations (such as catching up on child support or maybe a vehicle payment) can sometimes go ahead of catching up on your mortgage for a while. So Chapter 13 can be quite flexible.

If you are behind on homeowner’s insurance, that’s a serious problem. That alone is grounds for foreclosure of your mortgage. The lender will very likely impose its own very expensive “force-placed” insurance, wasting a lot of your money. This often aggravates your already difficult situation. Chapter 13 eases your cash flow so that you can afford to pay your insurance. To the extent force-placed insurance is already in the arrearage amount you owe, Chapter 13 provides a reasonable way to pay it.

If you’re behind on your home’s property taxes, that also is a separate ground for foreclosure. Whether the taxes are part of your mortgage payment or you pay it separately, Chapter 13 can solve this problem. As with homeowner’s insurance, if your lender already paid the taxes, you catch up on that along with the mortgage arrearage. If you pay taxes separately, you catch up with the taxing authority directly, as part of your 3-to-5 year payment plan. Both your mortgage lender and the taxing authority have to cooperate, as long as you fulfill your Chapter 13 obligations. 

Conclusion

Chapter 7 helps very directly, by discharging other debt so that you can better afford to pay your mortgage. Chapter 13 helps by providing a better way to deal with especially dangerous debts that Chapter 7 doesn’t handle well.

 

What to Expect at a 341 Meeting of Creditors

July 19th, 2019 at 6:49 pm

TX bankruptcy lawyer, TX chapter 7 attorney Once you have made the decision to file for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, prepared and filled out all required paperwork and filed that paperwork, you will have to attend a meeting. This meeting is referred to as a 341 meeting of creditors and will take place at a time, place, and location that is determined by the bankruptcy court and will include your bankruptcy trustee and creditors. This can be a nerve-wracking time for you because the trustee will ask you a series of questions about your application to ensure you are not trying to commit bankruptcy fraud and to discover whether or not you have nonexempt assets that could be sold to repay all or part of your debts.

During the Meeting

Prior to the 341 meeting of creditors, the bankruptcy trustee will have already reviewed your paperwork and financial records. During the meeting, the trustee will ask you a series of questions to gather more information about your case. By federal law, during the meeting, the trustee is required to ensure that you are aware of:

  • The consequences of filing for bankruptcy, such as the impact it will have on your credit history
  • Your ability to file for bankruptcy through different means, such as a Chapter 13 bankruptcy
  • The effect that receiving a discharge of your debts through a Chapter 7 bankruptcy will have
  • The effect of reaffirming a debt

The trustee will also ask you questions about why you are filing for bankruptcy, your monthly income and expenses, assets, debts, marital status and any dependents you might have. They will also want to know about any other financial obligations you may have, such as child support or spousal maintenance. The trustee will want to make sure that you do not have any assets that are not exempt that could be used to repay all or part of your debts. You will also have to attest, under oath, that all of the information that you have provided is true.

A Schertz, TX Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Attorney Can Help

If you are thinking about filing for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, there are certain requirements you must meet and procedures you must take. Help from a knowledgeable New Braunfels, TX Chapter 7 bankruptcy lawyer can be extremely helpful throughout the bankruptcy process. At the Law Office of Chance M. McGhee, we can help you prepare for your creditor meeting and we will also accompany you to the meeting to ensure your rights are protected. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/1/341-meeting.asp

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/11/341

Protecting Excess Home Equity through Chapter 13

July 15th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Chapter 13 can be a highly advantageous way to protect your home equity if that equity is larger than your homestead exemption amount.  

 

The Problem of Too Much Home Equity

Our last two blog posts were about protecting the equity in your home through the homestead exemption. Two weeks ago was about protecting the current equity; last week about protecting future equity. The blog post about protecting current equity assumed that the amount of equity in your home is no more than the amount of your applicable homestead exemption. For example, if your home is worth $300,000, your mortgage is $270,000, that gives you $30,000 of equity. If your homestead exemption is $30,000 or more that equity would be protected in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case.

But what if you have more equity in your home than the applicable homestead exemption amount? In the above example, what if you had $30,000 in equity but your homestead exemption was only $25,000? Your home could conceivably be sold by the bankruptcy trustee if you filed a Chapter 7 case. Your creditors would receive the proceeds of the sale beyond the homestead exemption amount. Presumably you need relief from your creditors. But clearly don’t want to give up your home and its equity in return for being free of your debts.

What about getting that equity out of the home through refinancing the mortgage? Well, what if you don’t qualify to refinance your home? You may not have enough of an equity cushion. Or your credit may be too damaged. Or maybe you’d qualify for a refinance but it still wouldn’t get you out of debt. That would not be a good option. So what do you do instead to protect your home and that equity?

The Chapter 13 Way to Protect Extra Equity

If your home equity is larger your applicable homestead exemption, then filing a Chapter 13 case can usually protect it.  Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” protects excessive equity better than Chapter 7. Essentially Chapter 13 gives you time to comfortably pay your general creditors for being able to keep your home.

Why do you have to pay your creditors to be able to keep your home? Remember, if your home equity is larger than your homestead exemption, the alternative is having a Chapter 7 trustee sell the house to get the equity out of it to pay to your creditors. Chapter 13 is often a tremendously better alternative, as we’ll explain here. Also, see Section 1325(a)(4) of the Bankruptcy Code.

Gives You Time to Comfortably Pay

Consider the example above about having $5,000 of equity more that the amount protected by the homestead exemption. Chapter 13 essentially would give you 3 to 5 years to pay that $5,000. This would be done as part of a monthly payment in your Chapter 13 payment plan. $5,000 spread out over 3 years is about $139 per month. Spread out over 5 years is only about $83 per month. Assuming this was part of a monthly payment that reasonably fit into your budget, wouldn’t it be worth paying that to your general creditors if it meant keeping your home and all of its equity?

It’s likely more complicated than this in your personal situation. You may be behind on your mortgage payments or owe income taxes, or countless other normal complications. But at the heart of it Chapter 13 can protect your equity in a flexible way. It’s often the most practical, financially most feasible way.

Chapter 13 is Flexible

To demonstrate Chapter 13’s flexibility, let’s add one of the complications we just mentioned: being behind on your mortgage. Chapter 13 usually allows you to catch up on your mortgage first. So, for example, most of your monthly plan payment could go to there during the first part of your case. Then after that’s caught up, most of the payment could go to cover the excess home equity. The creditors would just have to wait.

Protecting Your Excess Equity “For Free”

Sometimes you don’t have to pay your general creditors anything at all to protect the equity beyond your homestead exemption.  Consider the example we’ve been using with $5,000 of excess equity. Now, using another complication mentioned above, assume you owe $5,000 in recent income taxes. That tax is a nondischargeable” debt, one that is not written off in any kind of bankruptcy case. It’s a “priority” debt, one that you’d have to pay in full during the course of a Chapter 13 case. If you pay all you can afford to pay into your Chapter 13 plan, and it’s just enough to pay your $5,000 priority tax debt, nothing gets paid to your general creditors. You pay the priority tax debt in full before you have to pay a dime to your general creditors. If there is nothing left for the general creditors after paying all that you can afford to pay during your required length of your payment plan, you likely won’t need to pay those debts at all. 

This means that you saved the equity in your home by paying the $5,000 into your plan to pay off the tax debt. That’s a debt you’d have to pay anyway. You’d have to pay it if you didn’t file any kind of bankruptcy case. You’d have to pay it after completing a Chapter 7 case because it does not get discharged. And it also has to be paid in a Chapter 13 case. But in a Chapter 13 case you fulfill your obligation to pay the $5,000 (in our example) to protect your home equity (the amount in excess of the homestead exemption), whether it goes to the pay the tax or goes to pay the general creditors. Under the right facts you save your home and pay nothing to your general creditors.

Conclusion

Chapter 13 can be an extremely favorable way to keep a home with more equity than the homestead exemption amount. At worst, you’d pay the amount of equity in excess of the exemption. But you would do so based on a reasonable budget, with significant flexibility about the timing of payment. At best, you wouldn’t pay anything to your general creditors, when the money instead goes to a debt you must pay anyway, like the recent income tax debt in the example.

These situations depend on the unique circumstances of your finances.  See a highly competent bankruptcy lawyer to get thorough advice about how your circumstances would apply under Chapter 13.

 

Filing for Bankruptcy Due to Medical Debt

July 12th, 2019 at 6:34 pm

medical-debtMost of the time, a person files for bankruptcy because it is the last option for bills that cannot be paid. After all, a bankruptcy on your record can diminish your credit score and make it difficult to borrow money for items like a house or a car for years. When a person files for bankruptcy, it is because they have exhausted all other options. Unfortunately for many Americans, the thing driving them to file for bankruptcy is medical debt. According to CNBC, 66.5 of all bankruptcies filed in the United States between 2013 and 2016 were tied to medical issues such as high costs for medical care or taking time off of work for medical reasons. If you have found yourself in the precarious situation of too much medical debt, here are a few things you should know before you file for bankruptcy:

Your Medical Debt is Dischargeable in Bankruptcies

Here is the good news — medical debt is dischargeable in both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies. The type of bankruptcy you file for will entirely depend on your financial situation and which option would make more sense. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy would completely eliminate your medical debt, while a Chapter 13 bankruptcy would reorganize your debt into manageable payments.

There is No Such Thing as a Medical Bankruptcy

Technically, there is no such thing as a “medical bankruptcy”; there is no bankruptcy that can only discharge your medical debts. If you have medical debt and you file for bankruptcy, it is treated as an unsecured debt, which is in the same realm as credit card debt, personal loans and utility bills. Filing for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy would wipe out ALL of your unsecured debts — not just your medical debt.

There May Be Other Ways to Repay Your Debt

Before you make the decision to file for bankruptcy because of medical debt, you should make sure that you have absolutely no other options. Once you realize you are becoming overwhelmed with medical bills, you should immediately contact your hospital or health care provider to see if they offer any type of repayment plans. At the very least, you should inform them that you cannot pay the entire amount, but will pay what you can. If medical bills are preventing you from paying your rent or mortgage, utilities or other important bills, you may want to consider filing for bankruptcy.

Hiring a Boerne, TX Bankruptcy Lawyer Can Make Your Life Easier

If you are overwhelmed with medical debt, filing for bankruptcy may be your best option. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we can look at your financial situation and help you determine whether or not filing for bankruptcy to help with your medical debt is in your best interest. Our skilled New Braunfels, TX bankruptcy attorneys have years of experience under their belts and are prepared to guide you throughout the bankruptcy process. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/what-to-know-about-filing-medical-bankruptcy-4159606

https://www.thebalance.com/practical-steps-to-file-medical-bankruptcy-4158129

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html

 

 

Protecting Future Home Equity through Chapter 7

July 8th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Protecting present home equity is a sensible focus when considering bankruptcy. Protecting future potential equity can be even more important. 

 

Our last blog posts discussed how to protect the equity currently in your home through the homestead exemption. We discussed property exemptions in bankruptcy in general, and federal and state homestead exemptions in particular. Overall we showed how your homestead exemption can preserve the equity you presently have through a Chapter 7 case.

We mentioned that you can also protect your future home equity through these same tools, but we didn’t describe how. This is worth more attention.

Future Home Equity

Chapter 7 bankruptcy fixates on the present. It deals with debts you have at the moment your lawyer files the Chapter 7 case at the bankruptcy court. In particular, Chapter 7 usually is not interested in new assets you acquire after the date of filing, For example, the money you earn when you go to work the day after filing is outside bankruptcy jurisdiction. Again, for most purposes bankruptcy looks only at what you own on the date of filing.

This is also true as far as your home is concerned. Chapter 7 fixates on how much equity you have in the home at the moment of filing. That is, we look at what the home is worth then, and how much debt there is against it. (The debt includes all valid security interests against the home: mortgages, property taxes, income tax liens, etc.)

But those factors that determine your home equity—the home’s value, and the amount(s) you owe against it—change. They change all the time. The home’s value goes up and down (but mostly up) with the market. The debt on the security interests change every day with interest and every time you make a payment. Generally after filing bankruptcy and getting your financial house in order, you’d make progress paying down home debts. With the home value usually going up and debt against it going down in the years after filing bankruptcy, most people build equity in their home.  

Future Home Equity Greater than Present Homestead Exemption Amount

There’s a good chance that at some point—if you keep your home long enough—the amount of your home’s equity will exceed the applicable homestead exemption.

Take this example. A home is worth $300,000, the mortgage is $260,000, with a remaining equity being the difference, $40,000. Assume the applicable homestead exemption is $50,000. That covers the $40,000 in equity.

Now let’s say that in 3 years the home value increases to $335,000, and the mortgage is paid down to $250,000. The amount of equity at that point is the difference: $85,000. That’s $35,000 more than the applicable $50,000 homestead exemption (assuming that hasn’t been increased in the meantime).

If this homeowner filed a Chapter 7 bankruptcy now, the $40,000 in present equity is protected by the homestead exemption. But what if the homeowner doesn’t file bankruptcy now but waits 3 years to do so? The home equity will at that point have increased well beyond the amount the homestead exemption would protect.

Future Equity is Even More Important than Protecting Your Home Now

Sure, when you’re considering bankruptcy, your focus is on the present. As far as protecting your home equity, mostly all you want to hear from your bankruptcy lawyer is that the equity is covered now. Is the home equity going to be protected?

But as you think about whether you should file bankruptcy, Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, and when to do so, potential future equity is arguably an even more important consideration.

Most directly, there are simply likely more dollars at stake in future equity vs. present equity. In the above example, the person was protecting $35,000 in home equity when filing bankruptcy now. But by the same bankruptcy filing he or she was protecting $85,000 in future equity. Isn’t protecting that future $85,000 at least as important in protecting the present $35,000 in value?  

Conclusion

When you consider whether to file bankruptcy, you’re thinking about both the present and the future. You want relief and a fresh start now so that you can have a more financially peaceful and prosperous future. When thinking about your home, Chapter 7 allows you to preserve your present modest equity now so that it’ll have the opportunity to build it into much larger future equity.

Protecting Your Home Equity through Chapter 7

July 1st, 2019 at 7:00 am

You can protect the equity in your home if the amount of equity is no more than the homestead exemption applicable to residents of your state. 


 

Our last two blog posts outlined 15 separate ways that bankruptcy can protect your home now and/or in the future. We’ll be explaining each one of these ways in 15 separate blog posts. Here is the first one—protecting present and future equity in your home through Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.”

Property Exemptions in General in Bankruptcy

When you file a bankruptcy case, your assets are protected through a set of “exemptions.” “Exemptions” are categories of your assets that are protected for you from your creditors. Each category usually has maximum dollar limits. (See Section 522 on “Exemptions” in the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.)

Exemptions work somewhat differently in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Focusing today on Chapter 7, this is a “liquidation” form of bankruptcy. This means in theory that the Chapter 7 trustee takes—liquidates—anything you own not fitting within an exemption. 

However, the practical effect of exemptions is that most people filing under Chapter 7 get to keep everything they own.

The Homestead Exemption

The homestead exemption determines how much equity in your home you can protect from your creditors. As long as the amount of equity is no more than the homestead exemption amount, your home is safe in a Chapter 7 case.

As a quick example, assume your home is worth $300,000, you owe $265,000, so you have equity of $35,000. If the homestead exemption applicable to your state is $35,000 or more, your home is protected.

This means that your Chapter 7 trustee can’t take the home and sell it to pay the equity over to your creditors.

If you have too much equity, you wouldn’t be filing under Chapter 7. Not if you want to keep your home. See next week’s blog post about preserving home equity that’s more than your homestead exemption through Chapter 13.   

Federal vs. State Exemptions

Bankruptcy law provides a set of federal exemptions, while each state has its own set of exemptions as well. All have a homestead exemption. Can you use either the state or federal homestead exemption? If so, which should you use?

At the outset, since bankruptcy is a federal procedure why is state exemption law applicable at all?                                                    

The U.S. Constitution made bankruptcy a federal procedure to make it uniform throughout the country.  See Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the Constitution. But there are many areas in bankruptcy where state laws apply. One such broad area is property law. In an interesting compromise, Congress gave each state the power to require its residents to use that state’s set of exemptions instead of the federal ones. Section 522(b)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code.

So 31 states have decided you must use the state law exemptions. In the remaining 19 states you can use either the state or federal bankruptcy exemptions. Since the list is shorter these 19 states that give you a choice are:

Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

The Amount of Your Homestead Exemption

The homestead exemption amounts vary greatly state to state. For example, Kentucky’s homestead exemption protects only $5,000 in value or equity for an individual homeowner. On the opposite extreme, Nevada’s homestead exemption is $550,000. Plus a number of states—including Texas and Florida– have no dollar limit at all (although do have acreage limitations).

This can get quite complicated. For example, Kentucky residents can chose to use the federal homestead exemption instead of the modest state exemption.  But in all states you can’t pick and choose between the various federal and state exemptions. Section 522(b)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code. If you are in a state where you can use the federal homestead exemption, you can’t use any of the state exemptions that might be better for another category of assets. In the example of Nevada and Florida residents, who have such a large or unlimited homestead exemption, if they use that advantageous state homestead exemption they must use their state’s exemptions even if the federal ones may be better in other property categories.

Also, you can’t move to a new state and immediately claim that state’s generous homestead exemption. You must be “domiciled” in your new state for 730 days, or two years. Section 522(b)(3) of the Bankruptcy Code

Finally, your homestead exemption might be limited by a federal cap on the amount you can clam if you bought your home within 1,215 days (3-years and 4 months) before filing bankruptcy. Section 522(p) of the Bankruptcy Code. Effective April 1, 2019 (and for 3 years thereafter), this cap amount is $170,350. This is relevant only if your state homestead exemption is larger than this relatively large amount.

Need Legal Advice

There are other potential complications, depending on your situation. For example, what qualifies as a “homestead” to which you can apply the homestead exemption? What if you’re not on the title but instead buying a home on contract? What about leasehold interests you may have?  What happens if you own the property with your spouse, or with somebody else?

Your homestead exemption situation could well be very straightforward. But it may not be, even when it seems like it is. You need to get legal advice about this. It would be one of the first topics you would cover with your bankruptcy lawyer, and hopefully get reassured about.

Bankruptcy—including Chapter 7—can be a great way to protect present and future equity in your home. But it’s crucial to know for sure which homestead exemption applies to you, and whether it will definitely protect your home.

 

Can My Texas Bankruptcy Discharge Be Denied?

June 28th, 2019 at 9:58 pm

Texas bankruptcy attorney, Texas chapter 7 lawyer, Texas chapter 13 lawyer One of the last things that happens in the bankruptcy process is having your debts officially discharged, or forgiven. In other words, a discharge is the official release that you get when you are no longer personally liable for specific debts after you file for bankruptcy. A discharge requires all creditors to permanently stop any collection action against discharged debts, including legal action and phone calls or letters sent to your home. Discharge is the main goal of most people who file for bankruptcy, but is there is a possibility that your discharge could be denied?

Reasons for a Discharge Denial

Most of the time, a person who files for a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy will have his or her case end with a discharge. In some cases, however, you can receive a denial for your discharge, which can be both stressful and debilitating to some. Here are a few reasons why your discharge may be denied:

  • You tried to hide property. If you own certain property that is considered by the courts to be non-essential, such as multiple real estate holdings, multiple vehicles or other financial assets, you could be required to liquidate those to help pay some of your debt. If you are not honest about your property, your bankruptcy discharge could be denied.
  • You lied. In a bankruptcy, you are required to be honest and transparent on your bankruptcy forms and during any court hearings or meetings. You have to be truthful about your income, your assets and anything else having to do with your ability to pay your debts. If not, you could be denied a discharge of your debts.
  • You did not disclose a prior bankruptcy case. On your bankruptcy forms, you will be asked if you have previously filed for bankruptcy. You are required to be truthful about this question. If you received a Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge within the past eight years or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy discharge within the past six years, you may be denied an additional discharge.

Contact a Knowledgeable Boerne, TX Bankruptcy Lawyer Today

A discharge is what you expect to receive when you file for bankruptcy — it is the whole reason for filing in the first place. If you spend time and money to go through the bankruptcy process only to be denied a discharge, it can be frustrating, but a New Braunfels, TX bankruptcy attorney can help make sure this does not happen. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we will help you throughout the bankruptcy process and ensure your case goes smoothly to obtain a discharge of your debts. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/can-your-bankruptcy-discharge-be-denied-316324

https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-lose-your-bankruptcy-discharge-316312

https://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy/bankruptcy-basics/discharge-bankruptcy-bankruptcy-basics

More Bankruptcy Benefits for Your Home

June 24th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Besides helping with your mortgage, bankruptcy protects your home against other liens—from judgments, income taxes, and homeowner associations.  


Last week we gave you 7 ways that bankruptcy can either save your home now or protect it going forward. Here are the remaining 8 ways (#8 through #15), mostly involving involuntary liens placed on your home by special creditors.

8. Judgment lien “avoidance”:  

You can get rid of a present judgment lien that’s on your home’s title if it “impairs” your homestead exemption. This means that it “eats into” the equity that is protected by the exemption. Judgment lien avoidance turns a secured debt that you’d have to pay to protect your home into an unsecured one. See Section 522(f)(A) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.  You could then usually write off (“discharge”) that unsecured debt in a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Or you could pay little or nothing on that debt in a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”  

9. Prevent future judgment liens:  

Bankruptcy stops ongoing or future lawsuits against you. See the “automatic stay” of Section 362(a)(1) and(6) of the Bankruptcy Code. First, ongoing lawsuits are usually frozen in their tracks so they can never turn into judgments. Second, any creditors which have not sued you beforehand usually can’t ever do so (with some rare exceptions). So they can’t get a judgment, and can’t ever record a judgment lien on your home. Since not all judgment liens can necessarily get “avoided” under #8 above, it can be very important to file bankruptcy with your bankruptcy lawyer before a creditor gets a judgment.

10. Prevent upcoming income tax liens by discharging the tax debt: 

Similarly, in many situations bankruptcy prevents the IRS or your state from recording an income tax lien against your home. Section 362(a)(4 and 5). Under either Chapter 7 or 13 you can discharge older and otherwise qualifying tax debts. During the bankruptcy case the IRS/state can’t record a tax lien. And it can’t do so afterwards because the tax debt no longer exists. So, your bankruptcy filing prevented the tax from being secured against your home, which would’ve created serious disadvantages for you. As a result it’s highly preferable to file bankruptcy before a tax lien gets recorded.

11. Prevent upcoming income tax liens by paying off the tax debt:  

If the tax debt is newer or otherwise doesn’t qualify for discharge, pay the tax through Chapter 13 filed through your bankruptcy lawyer. Section 1322(a)(2). You pay the tax based on your realistic budget instead of the IRS/state’s imposed one. You can delay paying on the tax while you pay more important debts (such as to catch up on your mortgage). You don’t pay ongoing interest and penalties (since the debt is unsecured). Again, during the case the IRS/state can’t record a tax lien. And it can’t afterwards because by then you’ll have paid off the tax. You’d have prevented IRS/state from gaining the significant advantage against you of a recorded tax lien.

12. Prevent or address a child/spousal support lien against your home:  

Discharge your other debts with a Chapter 7 or 13 case so that you don’t fall behind on support payments. Or if you’re already behind, catch up on your support obligations with a Chapter 13 payment plan. As long as you pay as you’ve agreed, no new support lien can be imposed on your home. And your ex-spouse or support enforcement agency can’t foreclose on any pre-existing support lien. Your home is protected while you catch up.

13. Protect your home from your homeowners’ association:

If you’re get behind on homeowner association dues and/or assessments, your HOA gains tremendous power over you. You can regain the upper hand by filing a Chapter 13 case. You have to pay the back dues or assessment(s) if you want to keep your home. But you have as much as 5 years to catch up through a Chapter 13 payment plan. Throughout that time the HOA can’t foreclose or take other collection action, as long as you’re paying your plan.

14. Buy time to sell your home:

In many different situations, bankruptcy gives you more time to sell a home. You may need more time to get it ready for sale, or may want to move later for personal reasons. Chapter 7 usually delays a mortgage foreclosure, or similar actions against your home by other lienholders, for a few weeks or months through Chapter 7. You can likely get much more time to sell, sometimes as long as 5 years, through Chapter 13.

15. Resolve accounting disputes with your mortgage lender:

If you fall behind on your mortgage, it can be shockingly difficult to get on the same page with your lender about how much you owe. This is especially true if you have a history of being behind over an extended period. This accounting confusion has been a serious problem for millions of homeowners over the last decade or two. So, in 2011 a new procedure was created (mostly for Chapter 13) to efficiently resolve such disputes. See Rule 3002.1 of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. It’s a very handy tool when you’re trying to save your home and your lender is not cooperating.

 

Bankruptcy’s Many Benefits for Your Home

June 17th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy can save and protect your home in many different ways. One of these may be just what you need. Or you may use them in combination.   

 

We’ve got 15 distinct ways that bankruptcy can either save your home now or protect it in the near future. Here are the first 7—the remaining 8 we’ll give you next time:

1. Home equity protection:

 You can just about always protect any equity you have in your home through bankruptcy. You can do so through Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” if the amount of equity is no more than your applicable homestead exemption. (This is based on state or federal law, depending on your state.) Even if you have no equity in your home now, bankruptcy can protect equity that you build up going forward. See Section 522(b)(2), (b)(3), and (d)(1) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

2. Home equity larger than homestead exemption: 

If your equity is larger your applicable exemption, then a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” can usually protect it better than Chapter 7. That’s because it give more time and a better way to preserve that equity while under bankruptcy protection. See Section 1325(a)(4) of the Bankruptcy Code.

3. Free up cash flow for your mortgage payments:

If you’re not behind on your mortgage, write off your other debts to have money for your monthly mortgage payments. Talk with your bankruptcy lawyer to find out which debts will likely go away, and which may not. He or she will also help you create a post-bankruptcy budget. Hopefully it will showing that you can afford the mortgage after getting rid of the other debts. See Sections 727 and 1328 of the Bankruptcy Code.

4. Catch up with a forbearance agreement:  

If you’re not far behind on your mortgage, write off your other debts through Chapter 7. Then catch up on your missed mortgage payments through a forbearance agreement with your mortgage holder. Instead of paying other debts, put your money into saving your home. A forbearance agreement gives you a specific amount of time to get current, usually through designated extra payments.  

5. More time to catch up:

Chapter 13 gives you 3 to 5 years to catch up on your mortgage. This is generally much more time than you’d get through a forbearance agreement. With the catch-up payments spread out longer, they’re much smaller, and so more affordable. Throughout those catch-up years your mortgage lender can’t take collection or foreclosure action as long as you follow the agreed payment plan. See Sections 1322(b)(2) and 362(a)(4) and (5) of the Bankruptcy Code.

6. Prevent property tax foreclosure:

Pay back property taxes through a Chapter 13 payment plan. Again, you have 3 to 5 years to catch up, and protection from tax foreclosure in the meantime. Plus your budget will includes money for future property taxes so you won’t need to worry about that going forward.

7. “Strip” a junior mortgage.

“Strip” a second or third mortgage from your home’s title, thus greatly reducing your overall mortgage debt. If you meet the required conditions, you can stop paying the second and/or third mortgage payments. You’ll likely end up paying none or only a small part of a “stripped” mortgage balance. As a result the total debt on your home will get closer to the home’s value. You’d be able to create future equity faster as the home’s value increases in the future.

 

Marital Debt: Determining the Best Way to File for Bankruptcy

June 14th, 2019 at 5:48 pm

TX bankruptcy attorney, Texas bankruptcy lawyer Many people believe that being married means you automatically take on your partner’s debt. While it is true that assets you accrue during the marriage can be considered joint assets, that is not always the case for debts. You will only be legally responsible for your spouse’s debts if both of your names were used when you incurred the debt. It is not uncommon for only one spouse in a marriage to file for bankruptcy individually. Many of these single-spouse situations happen when a couple is married and one spouse has debt that they are having trouble repaying. For some couples, a major concern is whether or not they should file for bankruptcy jointly or separately.

Community Property and Community Debts

Before you decide if you will be filing for bankruptcy separately or with your spouse, it is important to look at the entire situation. Texas is a community property state, meaning that most of the property that was acquired during the marriage is jointly owned, or belongs to the “community,” which is you and your spouse. Because of this, even if just one spouse files for bankruptcy, all of the community property becomes part of the bankruptcy estate.

Though it may seem sequential that community debt also exists, it does not. The only debts you will be responsible for are the debts that you incurred either jointly or in your name only.

Should You File Individually or Jointly?

When it comes down to it, it all depends on your specific situation. Filing separately for bankruptcy in a community property state may not be the best idea because all community property in your marriage will become part of the bankruptcy estate. This means your spouse could be affected negatively by the bankruptcy and could possibly have their assets seized if they were acquired during the marriage.

Filing jointly will allow both spouses to discharge all of their debts, both individual debts and marital debts. You will also get to keep more property if you file jointly, rather than if you filed separately. The exemptions typically double for couples when they file for bankruptcy jointly.

Get in Touch With a Knowledgeable Boerne, TX Bankruptcy Attorney

The bankruptcy process is confusing, especially when you are dealing with the bankruptcy of a married person. If you have any questions pertaining to bankruptcy or if you would like to consult an attorney for your best options for filing, the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee is here to help. Our knowledgeable Kerrville, TX bankruptcy lawyers can help you and your spouse look at each scenario and determine your best course of action. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Source:

https://www.thebalance.com/can-i-file-bankruptcy-without-my-spouse-4156807

 

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