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Archive for the ‘Vehicle Loans’ Category

Qualifying for a Vehicle Loan Cramdown

May 20th, 2019 at 7:00 am

To qualify for a Chapter 13 vehicle loan cramdown, mostly your loan must be at least two and a half years old. There are exceptions to this. 

 

Last week’s blog post was about lowering monthly vehicle loan payments through Chapter 13 cramdown. This also often reduces how much you end up paying on the loan, and often even reduces its interest rate. Cramdown usually saves you money both immediately and long term. And you end up owning your vehicle free and clear at the end of your Chapter 13 case.  

Today we get into how to qualify for cramdown.

Qualifying for Cramdown—Timing

You can only do a cramdown if your vehicle loan is more than 910 days old when you file your Chapter 13 case. 910 day is about two and a half years. If you entered into the vehicle loan less than 910 days earlier, you can’t do a cramdown. You can’t reduce the monthly payments or the total amount paid on the loan.

The Bankruptcy Code says that you can’t do a cramdown if “the debt was incurred within the 910-day [period] preceding the date of the filing of the [Chapter 13] petition.” See the “hanging paragraph” following Section 506(a)(9) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

What’s the reason for this 910-day timing condition? It’s a benefit to vehicle lenders. New cars and trucks depreciate fast. You can’t buy a vehicle, have it depreciate quickly for a year or two, and then take advantage of the fact that the vehicle isn’t worth as much as you owe on it. You have to wait two and a half years before you can do this.

Qualifying for Cramdown—910-day Rule Doesn’t Apply

The 910-day rule applies only to vehicle loans that are for the purchase of the vehicle. Under the language of the Bankruptcy Code, the 910-day waiting period only applies when “the creditor has a purchase money security interest securing the debt.” See the same paragraph” following Section 506(a)(9) referred to above.

So a loan used to refinance a vehicle CAN be crammed down without waiting the 910 days. Also, if you borrowed money for some purpose and gave your vehicle as collateral for the loan, you can do a cramdown without waiting.  

This same 910-day waiting period also does not apply to vehicles purchased for business use. The Bankruptcy Code says the 910-day rule only applies if “the collateral for that debt consists of a motor vehicle… acquired for the personal use of the debtor.” See the same paragraph in the Bankruptcy we keep referring to.

There are open questions about both these “purchase money” and “personal use” conditions. For example, “personal use of the debtor” is not defined in the Bankruptcy Code. What about a pickup truck mostly used for operating a business but also used for personal transportation? Or how about a vehicle bought by a parent for the exclusive personal us of an adult child? Is that not the “personal use of the debtor” so that the 910-day rule does not apply?

The answers to these questions may turn on interpretations of the Code language by your local bankruptcy court. Talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about your own particular situation.

Qualifying for Cramdown—Undersecured Vehicle Loan

In case it’s not obvious, cramdown only works if your vehicle is worth less than the balance on your loan. You’re “cramming” the loan amount down to the secured amount of the debt. The more your loan is upside down the more cramdown can help.

If your vehicle is worth the same or more than you owe, there is no opportunity for cramdown. You might gain some other benefits on your vehicle loan from filing a Chapter 13 case, but no cramdown.

And how do you determine what your vehicle is worth for this purpose? For example, do you use “retail value” or “wholesale” or “trade-in” values? Should you use the Kelley or NADA Blue Book values or some other source? Again, these are questions for your bankruptcy lawyer, based on local law and practice.

Qualifying for Cramdown—Only in Chapter 13

Cramdown is not available under Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” You must file a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case. The payment and payoff terms of your cramdown are part of your 3-to-5-year Chapter 13 payment plan. In it you present the value of your vehicle, which indicates the secured part of your loan balance and the remaining unsecured part, and how much you intend to pay on each part.

(Cramdown is also available under Chapter 11 “reorganization,” which is generally used for corporate and other business bankruptcies. Section 1129(b)(2)(A). This blog post focuses instead on consumer oriented Chapter 13. But if you are operating a business or have unusually large debts, Chapter 11 may be an option to consider.)

 

Keep Your Vehicle through Cramdown

May 13th, 2019 at 7:00 am

If you can’t afford to pay your vehicle payments even after writing off your other debts under Chapter 7, consider a Chapter 13 loan cramdown. 

 

The last two blog posts have been about keeping your vehicle in a Chapter 7 case. Two weeks ago was about the benefits of reaffirming the vehicle’s loan. Last week was about possible ways of keeping the vehicle by making the loan payments but not reaffirming. These all assumed that you would keep on making the full monthly payments in order to keep the vehicle.

But what if you can’t afford the full monthly payments? Are there any other options if, even after getting rid of your other debt, you can’t pay the vehicle payments?

The answer: you may be able to reduce the vehicle payments through Chapter 13 cramdown. In fact, you may be able to significantly reduce the payments. And cramdown may give you some other huge financial benefits.

Reducing Monthly Payments through Cramdown

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is very different from Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” It takes much longer but Chapter 13 comes with some significant advantages. This includes the possible cramdown of your vehicle loan.

Under Chapter 13 you and your bankruptcy lawyer come up with a court-approved payment plan. That plan just about always significantly reduces what you pay monthly towards your debts. And if you successfully complete the plan you usually pay significantly less overall towards your debts.

Similarly, under cramdown you can often reduce both your monthly payment and the total you pay on your vehicle loan.

How Does Cramdown Work?

Your Chapter 13 payment plan treats secured debts and unsecured debts very differently. In general, secured debts need to be paid in full if you want to keep whatever the debt is securing. Unsecured debts usually only need to be paid as much as there’s money available to pay them.

So what if a secured debt—such as a vehicle loan—is only partially secured? That happens if the vehicle is worth less than the balance owed on the loan. The secured part of the loan is the amount equal to the value of the vehicle. The unsecured part is the rest of the loan balance—the part that effectively has nothing securing it.

Here’s a simple example. Let’s say you’d been paying for 3 years on a vehicle loan, you now still owe $15,000 but the vehicle is worth only $9,000. The secured portion of that vehicle loan is $9,000 and the unsecured portion is $6,000.

Recalculating the Payment Amount

Cramdown re-writes your vehicle loan so that your monthly payment gets calculated on only the secured part of the loan. In our example, your monthly payment now pays down only the $9,000 secured debt instead of the full $15,000 balance. Since the secured amount is less than the full loan balance, the new monthly payments are usually less.

The monthly payment is also reduced when those payments are stretched out over a longer period. They can extend as long as your Chapter 13 payment plan lasts, which is usually 3 to 5 years.

In addition, cramdown sometimes lowers the vehicle loan’s interest rate. That helps if your contract interest rate is high.

Combining all this, cramdown reduces your monthly payment by reducing the total amount it is paying off (the secured part of the loan), sometimes stretching the payment term out over a longer period, and often reducing the interest rate.

As a result, it’s not unusual for monthly payments to be chopped in half, or even better. It all depends on the details of your vehicle loan and on your finances going forward.  

What Happens to the Unsecured Part?

In our example, what happens under Chapter 13 cramdown to the remaining $6,000 unsecured part of the vehicle loan?

It’s lumped in with and treated just like your other “general unsecured” debts. Most of the time a Chapter 13 payment plan pays these low-priority debts only as much as you can pay them, if anything. That is, you pay “general unsecured” debts only AFTER paying the “priority” and secured debts.

There are exceptions, but this usually means you pay the unsecured part of your vehicle loan only if and to the extent you have money left over after paying other debts during the course of your payment plan. At your case’s completion any remaining amount gets “discharged,” permanently written off, along with your other “general unsecured” debts.

Qualifying for Cramdown, Other Considerations

Next week we’ll get into timing and other considerations in qualifying for a Chapter 13 vehicle loan cramdown.

 

Keep Your Vehicle without Reaffirmation

May 6th, 2019 at 7:00 am

Can you keep your vehicle without reaffirming its loan? Can you make the payments without reaffirming?  What if you can’t afford the payments? 

 

Last week we discussed keeping your vehicle in Chapter 7 by entering into a reaffirmation agreement with your vehicle lender. Through this agreement you exclude your vehicle loan from the discharge of debts. In return you get to keep your vehicle. You also get an early start on rebuilding your credit by making payments on and eventually paying off this loan.

We ended last week with two unanswered questions:

  • Would you be able to keep your vehicle in a Chapter 7 case if you DIDN’T sign a reaffirmation agreement but just kept current on your payments and insurance?
  • Are there any other options if you couldn’t afford the vehicle payments even after discharging your other debts?

We cover the first question today, the second one next time.

Risks to Avoid If You Can

Think long and hard before entering into a reaffirmation agreement. If you sign the agreement you’re passing up on this one-time opportunity to get out from under the debt. Be sure you understand the risk that you might not be able to make the loan payments at some point. Then you’d have to surrender the vehicle. At that point you would likely be left owing the lender a “deficiency balance.” This is the amount remaining on your debt after applying the lender’s proceeds from selling your vehicle after repossession.  The “deficiency balance” you’d owe would likely be much more than you expect because of the costs the lender is allowed to add to the debt, and the relatively small amount it would likely get from auctioning off your vehicle.

A “Ride-Through” Option?

One possible way to avoid this risk of a deficiency balance debt is to make the payments without reaffirming the debt.

The idea is that your lender shouldn’t be able to repossess your vehicle if you’re complying with all your contractual obligations. This mostly includes being perfect on your monthly payments and keeping the vehicle insurance current.

And if you don’t sign a reaffirmation agreement you won’t be liable for any remaining debt on the loan. The vehicle loan debt would be discharged along with your other debts.

So you’re trying to keep the vehicle without the risk of owing a big balance if you ever have to surrender it.

“Ride-Through” Problems

There’s one huge problem with this attractive-sounding option. In most (if not all) of the country, a vehicle lender DOES have the right to repossess a vehicle once the Chapter 7 case is over if there’s no signed reaffirmation agreement. This is true even if the loan payments and the vehicle insurance are current.

So, most lenders insist on a reaffirmation agreement if you want to keep the vehicle. They have good reason to do so. They want you to pay off the entire loan. You’ll more likely do that if you have the risk of owing a deficiency balance hanging over you throughout the remaining life of the loan.  The lender doesn’t want to leave you with the option of surrendering the vehicle whenever you want without financial penalty.

Your Remaining Options

You may nevertheless have some options.

  • Some vehicle lenders may still allow you to just keep current without reaffirming, and keep the vehicle. These would more likely be smaller lenders. This may work especially with a vehicle that’s already worth less than what you owe. In this situation the lender may prefer getting your monthly payments instead of having to take a loss on the loan. This may be better on their books now and the lender has a good chance of getting more money in the long run. So ask your bankruptcy lawyer if your lender may be amenable to this.        
  • In some situations the bankruptcy court may not approve a reaffirmation agreement.                                                                                                                                                                    This can happen if your lawyer will (strategically or otherwise) not sign off on the agreement. This then triggers the court’s review and necessary approval (which is not needed if your lawyer signs off). The court would likely not approve the agreement if your budget shows that you can’t afford the loan payments. If the court doesn’t approve the agreement, you may be able to keep the vehicle by just keeping current on the payments (by scrimping on the rest of your expenses). This option is tricky and should only be done with the advice and close assistance of your lawyer.
  • Some lenders might let you adjust the contract terms in your reaffirmation agreement, such as by lowering the monthly payments. Since then you’ll more likely be able to make the payments, it’s less likely the vehicle will get repossessed. So reaffirming in this situation is less risky. Frankly, most vehicle lenders aren’t this flexible, but talk with your lawyer about whether yours might be.
  • Chapter 13 “cram down” could force your lender to accept lower monthly payments, and even money overall. This is an important option if you must keep your car and can’t afford to do so without lower payments. This is the topic of next week’s blog post.

 

Keep Your Vehicle by Reaffirming its Loan

April 29th, 2019 at 7:00 am

If you want to keep your vehicle and still pay on its loan, file a Chapter 7 case to write off other debts and reaffirm the vehicle loan.  

A Vehicle Loan is a Secured Debts

We started this series of blog posts on debts by introducing secured debts as follows:

Each of your debts is either secured by something you own or it is not. A secured debt is backed up by a lien, a legal interest of the creditor in some kind of property of yours. See Section 101(37) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Usually you know whether a debt is secured. For example, in the case of a vehicle loan the vehicle’s title states that your lender is the lienholder. That lien on the title makes the loan secured by the vehicle. That, together with the security agreement you signed, gives the lender certain rights over your vehicle.

Let’s assume that you have a vehicle that you are paying for through a vehicle loan. If you look at your vehicle’s title, your lender is listed as the lienholder on your vehicle. The loan documents include a security agreement that gives the lender the right to repossess the vehicle if you don’t make the loan payments.

Also let’s assume that you really want to keep your vehicle. One of the main reasons you are considering filing bankruptcy is to write off all or most of your other debts so you can afford to pay your vehicle loan.

Reaffirming the Vehicle Loan

Filing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case could well accomplish this. It could permanently forgive (“discharge”) all or most of your other debts. That could free up enough of your monthly cash flow so you’d have money to pay your vehicle loan payments.

Talk with a bankruptcy lawyer to find out which of your own debts would be discharged. Bankruptcy discharges most debts, but there are quite a few exceptions. (See our last 10 blog posts about those exceptions.)  Your lawyer will help you put together your after–bankruptcy budget. From that you’ll see whether you’d be able to pay on your vehicle loan after discharging your other debts.

If so, filing a Chapter 7 case and signing a vehicle loan reaffirmation agreement may be your best option.

Reaffirmation Is a Voluntary Discharge Exception

A reaffirmation agreement excludes the vehicle loan from the discharge of debts Chapter 7 bankruptcy otherwise entitles you to. You enter into it voluntarily in return for getting to keep your vehicle.

It’s voluntary because you recognize that your lender has the right to take your vehicle if don’t make your payments. That doesn’t change when you file bankruptcy. The point of the reaffirmation agreement is to allow you to keep your vehicle.

Voluntarily Deciding Not to Reaffirm

You can file a bankruptcy case and choose NOT to reaffirm your vehicle loan. In a Chapter 7 case that would generally mean that you’d surrender the vehicle to your lender. The bankruptcy discharge would then virtually always write off any remaining debt you’d owe on the vehicle loan.

Think very seriously and open-mindedly about this option before you reaffirm the loan. Bankruptcy gives you a one-time opportunity to get out of the vehicle loan. Consider whether you would definitely be able to afford its monthly payments, insurance, maintenance and other costs. Find out what the vehicle is now worth compared to what you owe. Think creatively about other transportation options. Don’t just reaffirm the loan because you figure you have no other choice. Make it an informed choice, whichever way you choose.

The Risks of Reaffirming

A reaffirmation agreement excludes the vehicle loan from the bankruptcy discharge. So it returns to the lender all of the rights it had over you that it had before your bankruptcy.

That of course includes the right to repossess your vehicle if you don’t make payments on time. But likely also included is the right to repossess if you let the insurance lapse. Or the lender may impose its own insurance and charge you an exorbitant amount for it. The lender may even be quicker about force-placing insurance or repossessing after bankruptcy than before.

So do not enter into a reaffirmation agreement lightly. It would certainly be unfortunate for somebody to go through the efforts of a Chapter 7 case, get a fresh financial start, only to have a vehicle repossession and its resulting debt a year or two later.

Other Options?

Are there any other options if you couldn’t afford the vehicle payments even after discharging your other debts?

Also, would you be able to keep your vehicle in a Chapter 7 case if you DIDN’T sign a reaffirmation agreement but just kept current on your payments and insurance?

We’ll cover these practical questions in the next blog post or two.

In the meantime, reaffirmation agreements are covered by the Bankruptcy Code at Section 524(c).

 

The Surprising Benefits: An Example of Vehicle Loan Cramdown

October 1st, 2018 at 7:00 am

Vehicle loan cramdown can greatly reduce your monthly payment and the total amount you pay on your loan. Here’s a helpful example.

 

Cramdown in Chapter 13

Last week we introduced cramdown as an extremely helpful tool for reducing the cost of your vehicle loan. Cramdown can often:

  1. Reduce your monthly payments—sometimes significantly.
  2. Reduce the amount you pay on your vehicle contract altogether—often by thousands of dollars.
  3. Excuse you from catching up on any back payments on your vehicle.

Here’s an example to illustrate just how good cramdown can be.

The Facts in Our Example

Assume you are making payments on a 2015 Ford Fusion SE that you bought new more than three years ago. You bought from a dealer for $27,000. After adding the various fees and taxes, and subtracting your modest down payment, you financed $27,000. Because your credit was iffy your loan was at the high interest rate of 8.9% on a 84-month loan.

The monthly payment of $433 has been tough to keep up on. You’re now a month late and your next payment is due in a week. You know that you’re close to getting your vehicle repossessed.

After 34 monthly payments of $433 you’d normally owe about $18,000 but with a bunch of late fees and other charges you owe around $19,000. Your vehicle is currently worth $13,000, with 55,000 miles (average for a 2015 vehicle).

Under Chapter 7 “Straight Bankruptcy”

If you filed a Chapter 7 case you’d basically have a choice between keeping the car with its present loan terms or surrendering it and writing off the loan.

Assuming that you absolutely need the transportation, you’d have to “reaffirm” the loan. That means that you’d have to catch up on the missed payments and agree to keep it current. You’d be stuck with the current monthly payment amount. You’d be stuck with the high interest rate (costing you more than $9,000 over the length of the contract). If you ever failed to keep current and the vehicle got repossessed, you’d likely owe a large “deficiency balance.” And your vehicle would be gone.

Savings through Cramdown

In contrast, under Chapter 13 cramdown both your monthly payment and the total amount paid would be reduced.

In our example, you and your bankruptcy lawyer reduce the monthly payment as follows. The $19,000 balance on the contract gets divided into the secured and unsecured portions.

The secured portion is based on the current value of the vehicle: $13,000. You have 3 to 5 years to pay that amount. Depending on all the circumstances you should be able to reduce the interest rate—assume down to 4%. $13,000 amortized at 4% over the maximum 60 months works out to only about $239 per month.

What about the Unsecured Part of the Vehicle Loan?

What happens to the remaining unsecured portion in the amount of $6,000? (That’s the $19,000 current loan balance minus the above $13,000 secured portion.) It gets lumped into the pool of your other “general unsecured” debts. So what happens to that $6,000 debt?

It depends. In most situations you effectively pay nothing more during your Chapter 13 case as a result of this $6,000 debt. This would happen for two potential reasons.

0% Chapter 13 Plans

First, after paying allowed living expenses and higher priority debt—including the monthly $239 vehicle payments, and also recent income taxes, home mortgage and support arrearage, and such—you may have nothing left over for the general unsecured debts. Under these circumstances you’d be paying 0% on these debts during your Chapter 13 payment plan. Then at the end of the 3-to-5-year plan those general unsecured debts would be discharged—completely written off. This would include the $6,000 unsecured part of the vehicle loan. You’d pay nothing on it (and still keep your vehicle).

Partial Payment Chapter 13 Plans

Second, you may instead have some money during your plan to pay towards your general unsecured debts. But even then, in most Chapter 13 cases the existence of the unsecured part of your vehicle loan does not increase how much you pay into your plan over the life of the plan.

Let’s add a few more facts to our example. Assume that you have $40,000 in other general unsecured debts (credit cards, medical bills, old income taxes, and such). Add the $6,000 unsecured part of your vehicle loan, for a total of $46,000 of general unsecured debts. Assume also that over the course of your Chapter 13 plan you have disposable income (after allowed expenses and higher priority debts) totaling $4,000. You pay that $4,000 over time through your monthly plan payments.

If you didn’t owe the $6,000 unsecured part of your vehicle loan, that $4,000 would result in you paying 10% of your general unsecured debts ($4,000 out of $40,000 owed). When you include the $6,000 unsecured part, the $4,000 paid would result in you paying about 8.7% of your general unsecured debts ($4,000 out of $46,000 owed). But either way you’re paying what you can afford to pay—$4,000 over the life of your case. The existence of the $6,000 unsecured part of the vehicle loan has no effect on how much you pay. What you pay just gets distributed a little differently. The other general unsecured debts get pay a little less so that the $6,000 debt receives a small part of the $4,000.

Most Plans Do Not Pay More Resulting from the Unsecured Part of the Vehicle Loan

This happens in most cases that are not 0% plans (discussed above). The only way that an unsecured part of a vehicle loan would increase the amount you pay in your plan is if you have disposable income larger than your other general unsecured debts. In the example, you’d have to have more than $40,000 of disposable income during your plan. Only then would the addition of the $6,000 unsecured part of your vehicle loan to the general unsecured pool increase what you’d pay. That situation is rare. Most people don’t have disposable income during their case larger than their non-vehicle general unsecured debts.

Qualifying for Cramdown

Remember that cramdown is only available in Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.” Not Chapter 7. Also, to qualify the vehicle loan must be at least 910 days old (about 2 and a half years) when filing the Chapter 13 case.  And finally, cramdown is beneficial for most purposes only when the vehicle is worth less than the balance on the loan. The more it’s worth less, the greater the likely benefit of the cramdown.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Saving Your Vehicle Better through Chapter 13

September 24th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 7 is limited in how it can help with your vehicle loan. Chapter 13 can do much more—buy more time and often reduce your payments. 

 

Problems to Solve

Last week we addressed the kind of help Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” provides on your vehicle loan. Mostly it clears the deck of your other debts so that you can afford to keep your vehicle. Hopefully Chapter 7 accomplishes that.

But what if you can’t afford the contractual monthly payments even then? What if your vehicle isn’t worth what you owe on it? What if you’re behind on your payments or insurance and can’t catch up fast enough?

If you can’t or don’t want to keep your vehicle Chapter 7 also gives you the option of surrendering it. The benefit is that it legally write off your obligation to pay the “deficiency balance.” That’s the often surprisingly large remaining debt after a vehicle repossession or surrender. Writing off the debt is better than being saddled with it if you don’t file bankruptcy.

But what if you definitely need to keep your vehicle but can’t do so under Chapter 7? What can Chapter 13 do for you better?

Chapter 13 Buys Time—Often much More Time

If you are late on your vehicle loan payments, filing a Chapter 7 case will prevent an immediate pending repossession. But then virtually always you’ll have to catch up on any arrearage within the next month or two. That’s of course on top of keeping up on ongoing monthly payments.

Chapter 13 usually gives you much more time. Instead of giving you weeks to catch up, usually you’d have many months to do so. Exactly how much time you’d have depends on many factors. But generally you’d start paying your regular payments as they became due, and then chip away at the arrearage over the course of at least several months.

Chapter 13 “Cramdown” May Reduce Monthly Payments—Sometimes Significantly

You don’t always have to pay your regular monthly payments as they come due after filing under Chapter 13. If you qualify for “cramdown” you would likely pay less per month on the vehicle loan—possibly much less.

Cramdown is an informal term for the Chapter 13 procedure for legally re-writing the loan if your vehicle is worth less than you owe. To qualify your vehicle loan must be more than 910 days old at your Chapter 13 filing. (That’s slightly less than two and a half years.)

The loan payments are reduced because the loan is restructured based on the value of the vehicle. You pay that secured portion of the loan through monthly payments. Those payments are usually much less because they are based on the vehicle value instead of the contract balance.

Also, the payments are further reduced under Chapter 13 if the amount to be paid is to be paid out over a period longer than the time left on the contract.

Finally, if your vehicle loan has a relatively high interest rate, you can often also reduce that rate.

Each of these helps reduce the monthly payment on the loan.

You May Not Need to Catch Up on Missed Payments

If you qualify for cramdown you usually don’t have to pay any missed payments after filing a Chapter 13 case. You just pay going forward, at the reduced monthly payment.

Not having to scramble to pay missed payments is a huge benefit. You can concentrate on your most important obligations, such as the crammed down monthly payment.

Catching Up on Lapsed Vehicle Insurance

If you’d fallen behind on your vehicle insurance, that would be an extremely important obligation to focus on. You DO have to reinstate lapsed insurance quickly in order to keep your vehicle—in either Chapter 7 or 13. So the fact with cramdown you may not have to pay any missed payments or else be allowed to catch up more slowly means that you’d have more money available to reinstate your insurance.

Examples, Please

No doubt the benefits listed above sound great. It’s great to have much more time to catch up or to not need to catch up at all. It’s great to have reduced monthly payments, to pay less overall on a vehicle until it’s yours free and clear.

But these benefits would make more sense and be even more impressive if we showed how they work in practice. We’ll do that in our blog post next time.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Saving Your Vehicle Better through Chapter 13

The Surprising Benefits: Saving Your Vehicle through Bankruptcy

September 17th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Bankruptcy can get you out of the dilemma that a vehicle loan can put you in. Chapter 7 works if you can afford the loan payments afterwards.  


Here’s the Problem

You’re paying on a car or truck. You absolutely need this vehicle for getting to work, and to keep your life going. You can’t do without it.

But you’re having trouble keeping up on the loan payments. You owe lots of other debts, so keeping current on the vehicle loan is a big challenge. It’s a big stressor every month.

On top of that there’s a good chance that you owe more on your vehicle than it is worth. You know that if you somehow found other reliable transportation and surrendered your present vehicle—or if it was repossessed—you could easily still owe thousands of dollars of “deficiency balance.” That’s the amount you would owe on the loan after the surrender or repossession.

The amount you’d owe would very likely be much more than you expect. That’s because repossessed vehicles are usually sold at auto auctions, resulting in less credit to your account than you’d expect. Plus the costs of repossession/surrender and sale, and late charges and such would all be added to the balance. So giving up the vehicle doesn’t seem to make any sense.

As a result you feel stuck. You really need the vehicle but you can’t afford pay for it. And even if you could somehow do without it, you’d likely still owe thousands of dollars from letting it go.

Chapter 7 Regular Bankruptcy Gives Limited Help

Chapter 7 bankruptcy accomplishes two things regarding your vehicle loan. First, if you want to keep the vehicle, Chapter 7 would likely get rid of most of your other debts. Maybe then you could afford the vehicle payments. Or second, if you surrendered the vehicle, Chapter 7 would likely discharge (legally write off) the deficiency balance. If you had a way to get another reliable vehicle, or could do without, this might solve your problem.

What Chapter 7 doesn’t do is give you the power to change the terms of your vehicle loan. It’s “take it or leave it.” If you want to keep your vehicle, you’re virtually always stuck with the contract terms. That includes the monthly payment amount, the interest rate, etc.

Plus, you’re almost always required to “reaffirm” the debt. This legally excludes the vehicle loan from the discharge of your debts. You continue to owe it in full in exchange for keeping the vehicle.

This is economically risky. You’re paying for something that isn’t worth what you’re paying. And if you later surrender the vehicle or it’s repossessed, you would owe a deficiency balance. You’d owe it in spite of your prior Chapter 7 case because you reaffirmed the debt.

If You’re Behind on Your Vehicle Loan, or on Insurance

It’s worse if you aren’t current on your loan payments at the time of your Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing. Almost always your vehicle lender would require you to quickly catch up—within a month or two of filing. This would be on top of keeping current on the ongoing monthly payments. Or else you’d lose the vehicle in spite of filing bankruptcy.

If you’ve also let your insurance lapse, it’s even more problematic.  Your lender knows how dangerous lack of insurance is for itself, so it would “force-place” insurance on your vehicle. Your contract almost certainly allows it to do this. Force-placed insurance tends to be very expensive while at the same time provides you very little coverage. Under Chapter 7 you would likely have to pay for any such insurance, plus reinstate your own insurance. And you’d likely have to do this very quickly, not long after filing your Chapter 7 case.  

Chapter 13 Can Solve These Problems

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” can solve these problems that Chapter 7 can’t.

First, Chapter 13 can buy you much more time. A Chapter 13 payment plan would likely give you much more time to catch up on any missed loan payments. It would also likely give you lots more time to pay for any force-placed insurance.

Second, if you qualify for “cramdown” you would likely pay less on the vehicle loan—possibly much less. Cramdown is an informal term for the Chapter 13 procedure for legally re-writing the loan in situations in which the vehicle is worth less than you owe. With cramdown you could both pay less monthly and pay less overall before the vehicle became yours free and clear. And if you’re behind on loan payments, you would not need to catch up at all on any of those missed payments.

Next week we’ll tell you how Chapter 13 could both buy you time and save you money on your vehicle loan(s).

 

The Surprising Benefits: Getting Back Your Repossessed Vehicle

May 28th, 2018 at 7:00 am

It’s much easier to prevent repossession by filing bankruptcy beforehand. But if you’ve already been repo’d, you now have to act very fast. 

 

When Does a Lender Repossess a Vehicle?

When CAN a vehicle lender repossess your vehicle? Just about all vehicle loan contracts let the lender repossess the minute you are late on a payment. There may be a legal grace period, but not usually. This is also true for other breaches of the contract, such as if you let the vehicle insurance lapse.  So usually a lender can repossess, without warning, when you are not in fully compliance with any contract obligations.

But most lenders don’t repossess right away. They’d usually rather have you make the payments so that they earn the interest on the contract. But they have the legal right to repossess, and sometimes act very fast.

So how much time do you have before your lender would actually repossess? That depends on your payment history and the repossession practices of the lender. It’s truly hard to tell how many days you  can be late, or how long your insurance can be lapsed, before repossession.

Much Better to File BEFORE Repossession

Filing bankruptcy stops repossession from happening immediately. It literally stops the repo agent from taking your vehicle even if he or she has already started to do so.

The moment your bankruptcy lawyer electronically files your case the “automatic stay” goes into effect. This “stays,” or legally stops, virtually all collection efforts against you and your property. Specifically, filing bankruptcy stops the enforcement of lender’s liens against your property. A vehicle repossession is an enforcement of a lender’s lien on your vehicle, and so it is stopped. See Subsections 362(a)(4) and (5) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code about the “stay… of… any act to… enforce any lien” against your property.                                                                                                          

Filing a Chapter 7 vs. 13 Case to Stop Repossession

A Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” will stop a pending repossession. It will give you a bit of time to bring your loan current. Usually you’ll have no more than about 2 months, sometime less, seldom more. If your insurance has lapsed you’ll have to reinstate it pretty much right away.

Stopping repossession by filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” gives you lots more time to catch up on the late payments. Instead of a couple months under Chapter 7, under Chapter 13 you get as much as a few years to catch up. Also you may qualify for “cramdown” of the vehicle loan. If so, after stopping the repo you may not need to catch up at all. Plus you may be able to reduce your monthly payments and pay less overall for the vehicle than you would have under the contract. “Cramdown” is not available in Chapter 7. But even under Chapter 13, you still need to pay to reinstate any lapsed insurance quickly to be able to keep your vehicle.

Getting Back Possession AFTER Repossession

Whether you can get your vehicle back after it’s already been repossessed depends on timing and the bankruptcy Chapter you file under.

As for timing, you DO have to act fast. Otherwise it will be too late to get it back, even through bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy’s “automatic stay” stops the lender, at least temporarily, from taking the next steps after the repossession. That’s because those next steps are at least arguably part of the lender’s enforcing its lien on the vehicle, which bankruptcy stops. This may depend on your state’s laws and local interpretations of bankruptcy law. Your bankruptcy lawyer will talk with you about this in your conversation about the repossession.

The next steps after repossession usually involve selling the vehicle, often in an auto auction. Once your lender sells the vehicle, it’s too late to get back your vehicle through bankruptcy.

Chapter 7 vs. 13 in Getting Back Possession

Assuming you file fast enough, whether you actually getting your vehicle back often depends on whether you file under Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.

A Chapter 7 case will work only if you have a fair amount of money immediately available. You’d have to pay the repossession costs (of likely hundreds of dollars) plus bring the account fully current. If you’re not current on insurance you’ll also have to pay to reinstate it.

Even all that may not be enough. If your lender still doesn’t want to cooperate, it may be able to avoid giving back your vehicle.  Whether or not it can be forced to depends on how your local bankruptcy court interprets the law.

Filing Chapter 13 is much more likely to be effective. That’s because it provides a legal mechanism for you to catch up on the back payments over a much longer period of time. This is done through monthly payments in your court-approved Chapter 13 plan. You will still likely have to pay the repossession costs up front. Plus you’ll have to be current on insurance. Then if your plan shows that you’ll catch up on the back payments, most lenders will voluntarily return your vehicle. If not, the bankruptcy court would likely order the lender to do so.

 

How to Get Back a Repossessed Vehicle

May 25th, 2018 at 9:17 am

repoIn the United States, 170 million consumers depend on a vehicle for daily activities. From trips to the grocery store to a daily commute to work, Americans rely heavily on having independent transportation. Unfortunately, when financial hardship strikes, lenders are quick to repossess their vehicles, even if payments are only one month behind, in some cases. The next part of ur “Surprising Benefits” series explains how filing for bankruptcy can stop a repossession from occurring or even return a repossessed car back to your possession.

If It Is Still in Your Possession

In the state of Texas, repo agents do not need to notify you before taking your vehicle. Realistically, if your payment is in default, even just by a short time, a repossession agency may already be looking for your car, truck, motorcycle, RV, or any other vehicle burdened with a loan. Filing for bankruptcy may be a viable solution to your situation. Bankruptcy places an “automatic stay” is on all collection attempts for all loans, including your vehicle. For many Americans, this stay is enough to catch up on payments, without including it in the bankruptcy process.

After It Is Repossessed

If the car is already repossessed, there is still a possibility of having the vehicle returned; but you must act fast. Lenders work quickly to send the repossessed cars to auction and often have them sold within two weeks. Once the vehicle is sold to a third party, it is too late to have it returned, and you may still owe money to your lender. Typically, the amount the car earns at auction goes toward the original loan balance and the debtor is responsible for the difference, which will include interest and repossession fees. Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy stops the sale of the vehicle, renegotiates the terms of the loan over the next three to five years, and returns the car to your possession. A lender may still hold the debtor responsible for the repossession fees. However, many find that preferable to losing the car entirely and still owing.

Ask an Attorney

If your vehicle loan is in default, there is a possibility that you are up for repossession. Depending on the bank and your past payment history, you may have a more extended amount of time, but this is not guaranteed. Stop the guessing game today by contacting a Schertz, TX bankruptcy lawyer. Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee understand how frustrating it is avoiding collection calls and the damaging impact losing a car can have on your career and your ability to put food on the table. Call us at 210-342-3400 today to schedule your free, no-obligation consultation to further explore your vehicle-saving options.

 

Sources:

https://hedgescompany.com/automotive-market-research-statistics/auto-mailing-lists-and-marketing

https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2014/02/9-reasons-us-ended-so-much-more-car-dependent-europe/8226/

Cramdown on Vehicle Not Bought for Personal Use

January 17th, 2018 at 8:00 am

The 910-day condition for doing a vehicle debt cramdown don’t apply if the vehicle was not “acquired for the personal use of the debtor.”  

The Cramdown Advantage

The last several blog posts have been about the advantages of Chapter 13 cramdown, especially the cramdown of vehicle loans. Cramdown can be an excellent way to keep your vehicle. It usually allows you to reduce the monthly payment as well as the total you pay on the debt. Often the payment reduction is significant. You can often save thousands of dollars compared to what you’d usually pay on the debt overall.  Through cramdown you may be able to keep a car or truck that you couldn’t afford to otherwise.

Because of these advantages vehicle loan cramdown may be a reason to file a Chapter 13 case. It’s not available under Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.”

The 910-Day Condition on “Personal Use” Purchases

As we said in a blog post last week, there is usually a timing condition you need to meet to do a vehicle loan cramdown. In most consumer bankruptcy situations you must have entered into the contract more than 910 days (about two and half years) before filing the Chapter 13 case. So if you bought and financed a vehicle more recently you wouldn’t be able to do a cramdown.

But that only applies when “the collateral for that debt consists of a motor vehicle… acquired for the personal use of the debtor.” (See the unnumbered “hanging paragraph” right after Section 1325(a)(9) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.)  So if your vehicle was acquired for business use, or some other non-personal use, the 910-day condition does not apply. You could do a cramdown on the loan in a Chapter 13 case filed at any time.

An Example

Imagine that eighteen months ago you bought a truck for a business that’s in your name. You financed the entire $50,000 purchase. The truck is now worth $32,500.

Your business has just failed and you need to file bankruptcy. You need to keep the truck because you sold your other vehicle to try to keep the business going.

On the advice of your bankruptcy lawyer you are filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case.  There are other reasons to do so having to do with income tax debts. But you also learn you can do a cramdown on this truck loan and save money. You can do so even though you’re still a year short of the 910 days (about two and half years) since getting the loan.

Again, that’s because that 910-day condition would only apply if the truck was bought for “personal use.” If it was clearly bought for the business, you can do a cramdown without waiting the 910 day from the purchase to the Chapter 13 filing. (Your lawyer will review the loan documents to make sure they don’t indicate the purchase was for personal use.)

As a result your truck loan would effectively be rewritten based on the $32,500 current truck value. You would very likely be able to reduce the monthly payment on the loan. You would also very likely be able to pay thousands of dollars less overall before you owned the truck free and clear. Finally, besides saving you money immediately and long-term, it may enable you to keep the vehicle when you could not afford to do so otherwise.

 

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