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Archive for the ‘Chapter 13 plan’ tag

The Surprising Benefits: Keeping Your Vehicle Lease under Chapter 13

November 5th, 2018 at 8:00 am

You can keep your leased vehicle under Chapter 7 if you’re current. If not, or have other reasons to do a Chapter 13 case, that’s works too.


Lease Assumption under Chapter 7

Our last blog post showed how to keep a leased vehicle by “assuming” the lease in a Chapter 7 case. This means you keep making the lease payments. You also continue being legally bound by all the other terms of the lease contract.

Problems under Chapter 7

But what if you’re behind on your lease payments, and can’t catch up right away? Very likely the lessor would not allow you to assume the lease. And even if you could you’d be in default on the lease immediately and subject to repossession. You could easily end up owing a substantial amount of damages, and still be without a vehicle.

The Solution under Chapter 13

Filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case solves this problem by giving much you more time to catch up on late payments.

A Chapter 13 case revolves around a formal court-approved payment plan that you and your bankruptcy lawyer put together. Your Chapter 13 plan will have a provision stating that you are assuming the unexpired vehicle lease. See Part 6 of the Bankruptcy Court’s official Chapter 13 Plan form. Besides listing the name of the lessor, a short description of the leased vehicle, and the monthly payment, you state the “Amount of arrearage to be paid” and the terms by which it will be paid through the plan. Usually you can catch up on the arrearage under terms that would fit within your budget.  

There is an opportunity for objection to such terms, particularly by the lessor. But usually the lessor is happy that you are choosing to continue being liable on the lease contract. Unless your payment history is terrible, or you’ve violated the lease agreement in other ways (such as not keeping insurance in effect) you’re mostly not going to get any objection. If there’s no objection, or any objection is resolved, the bankruptcy judge will approve or “confirm” the plan. (This assumes that the plan is otherwise ready for confirmation.)

This gives your proposed way of dealing with the lease, including the missed payments, the force of a court order. As long as you comply with those terms you’ll be able to keep your leased vehicle.

Limited Benefit on Leased Vehicles with Chapter 13

Chapter 13 gives you less possible advantages with a vehicle lease than if you had a vehicle loan. There is no opportunity for a Chapter 13 “cramdown” with a lease. A loan cramdown potentially reduces the loan’s monthly payments and the total amount paid to own the vehicle free and clear. Chapter 13 does not enable you to reduce your monthly lease payment. It does not take a penny off what you have to pay over the life of the lease.

Chapter 13 merely allows you to keep a leased vehicle through its lease term. The only real advantage it gives you over Chapter 7 is giving you more time to catch up on any unpaid lease payments. That may be an important advantage if you are desperate to keep the vehicle and are behind.

But be careful. Be aware that if you assume the lease under Chapter 13 you continue being liable on the other terms of the lease. For example, at the end of the lease you could owe money for high mileage or extra wear and tear. You could even lose the vehicle if you didn’t keep up the monthly lease payments. On top of that you could owe additional penalties for early termination of the lease.

Conclusion

Do you need a Chapter 13 case for any of the many other advantages it can give you? Then you will likely also be able to keep your leased vehicle as you’re dealing with those other issues.

Are you behind on your leased vehicle and absolutely want to keep it? Are you fully aware of the possible disadvantages of staying in your lease (partially outlined above)? If so, then Chapter 13 provides a way to keep your leased vehicle by catching up on the missed payments over time while you are protected from repossession.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Ending Your Vehicle Lease under Chapter 13

October 24th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 7 gets you out of a vehicle lease owing nothing. Chapter 13 is more complicated but can give you pretty much the same good result.

 

Ending a Vehicle Lease in Chapter 7

Our last blog post was about how a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” can get you out of a vehicle lease. You can “reject” a financially bad lease, and then discharge (permanently write off) whatever you’d owe after surrendering the vehicle. Otherwise you could owe a lot of money when you get out of the lease.

So if you decide that you don’t want to keep your leased vehicle, and need bankruptcy relief, Chapter 7 is likely the cleanest solution.

Ending a Vehicle Lease in Chapter 13

But what if you have other reasons to file a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case instead? Chapter 13 can be a great way to save your home, catch up on child or spousal support, deal with income tax debt, and solve many other big financial problems, much better than under Chapter 7.

So it’s good news that you can surrender your leased vehicle through Chapter 13 just like under Chapter 7. However, discharging any resulting debt from the lease contract is not as straightforward as in a Chapter 7 case. Here’s how it works.

Possible Debts from Surrendering a Leased Vehicle

First be aware that you could owe various kinds of debts when you surrender a leased vehicle. Surrendering before lease end could make you liable for contractual penalties and/or all the remaining unpaid lease payments. Surrendering the vehicle at the end of the lease could make you liable for high mileage, excessive wear and tear, and the difference between the vehicle’s originally anticipated value at the end of the lease and the actual “realized value” then. Either way the amount you would owe could be thousands of dollars.  

Rejecting the Lease under Chapter 13

Under Chapter 13 you have the options of either rejecting the lease and returning the car, or continuing the lease. For today we’re assuming you no longer need or want to keep and pay for the vehicle.

The immediate benefits of rejecting the lease are just like under Chapter 7. You immediately stop paying the monthly lease payments, and then return the vehicle to the lessor after filing the case. If you’re behind on payments, you don’t have to pay them.

But under Chapter 13 there’s a complication. Your lessor can file a “proof of claim” reflecting whatever amount you would owe under the lease contract. The lessor does so in order to try to get paid part of any remaining debt. This debt is then added to the pile of all your other “general unsecured” debts.

The Category of “General Unsecured” Debts in Chapter 13

In a Chapter 13 case, your debts are divided into categories, one being your “general unsecured” debts. These are the debts that are 1) not secured by any of your property or possessions, and are also 2) not a “priority” debt (various specially-treated ones).

Often you have to pay all or most of what you owe on your secured and priority debts. But this is seldom true with general unsecured debts. Often you pay little or even nothing on your general unsecured debts in a Chapter 13 case. Whether or how much you pay depends on a lot of factors. The main factors are the amount of your secured and priority debts, and how much you can afford to pay to all of your creditors after expenses.

Often Vehicle Lease Debt Does Not Increase What You Pay

In most Chapter 13 cases a debt from surrendering your leased vehicle does not increase what pay in your case. That is, adding what you owe on the lease to your other general unsecured debts does not increase the amount that you pay into your pool of general unsecured debts.

There are two circumstances where that happens, one less common and other very common.

First, in some parts of the country you are allowed to pay 0% of your “general unsecured” debts. This happens if all you can afford to pay during your 3-to-5-year payment plan goes to your secured and priority debts. This leaves no money for the general unsecured debts. Paying 0% of the general unsecured debts means paying 0% on any vehicle lease debt.

Second, in most situations you end up paying the pool of general unsecured debts a specific amount of money. That amount is what you can afford to pay through the plan minus what goes to secured and priority debts. That specific amount gets divided up among the general unsecured debts. This amount being paid to the general unsecured debts does not increase if there is more of those debts. Adding the debt from the surrendered leased vehicle just reduces the amount other general unsecured debts receive. It does not increase how much you pay.  

For example, assume that after you pay all your secured and priority debts you have $2,000 left over to pay all your general unsecured debts over the life of your Chapter 13 plan. Your vehicle lessor files a claim saying you owe $3,000 after surrendering the vehicle. You owe $30,000 to all your other general unsecured debts. Adding the $3,000 lease debt to the other $30,000 means you owe a total of $33,000 of general unsecured debts. But you pay only the $2,000 that is available (over the life of the plan) either way. Having the $3,000 lease debt just means that the other general unsecured debts receive that much less.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Chapter 13 Potentially Discharges Divorce Property Settlement Debts

September 10th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 13 can write off some or all of the non-support debts included in your divorce. But it comes with some potential disadvantages. 


Last week we explained how Chapter 7 cannot write off non-support divorce debts, but Chapter 13 can. We said if you owe a significant debt created by your divorce decree (for other than child or spousal support) you should talk with a bankruptcy lawyer. Don’t necessarily think that Chapter 13 is your best option with this kind of debt. Chapter 13 has advantages and disadvantages. We get into these now so you can start to see which option is best for you.

Non-Support Divorce Debts

Support debts are not discharged (written off) under either Chapter 7 or 13. Only non-support debts can be discharged under Chapter 13 (and not Chapter 7). So we need a quick, practical reminder what we mean by non-support debts.

We said last week:

Most non-support debts are those obligations in your divorce decree related to the division of property and the division of debts between you and your ex-spouse.

The Division of Property

… often in a divorce one ex-spouse receives less assets than the other. For example, you may receive a vehicle worth much more than your ex-spouse. Or you may get the family home. So you’re required to pay your ex-spouse half of the equity in the home to make up the difference. Whatever specific amount you’re required to pay in these kinds of situations is a non-support divorce debt.

The Division of Debts

Also, for whatever reason your divorce decree may have required you to pay a debt arising from the marriage. This debt may be a jointly-owed one, one that you owe individually, or even one that only your ex-spouse owes. The decree orders that your ex-spouse no longer has to pay that marital debt. You have to pay it by yourself.

… . This obligation by you to your ex-spouse to pay the debt is a non-support divorce debt.

Disadvantages of Chapter 13

The main advantage of Chapter 13 for this kind of debt is that you could avoid paying most or even all of it. Also, Chapter 13 has many other potential advantages over Chapter 7, some of which may well apply to your situation. These are beyond the scope of today’s blog post.

Let’s focus instead on three main potential disadvantages of Chapter 13 for this kind of debt. These are: 1) delay in discharge, 2) risk of no discharge, and 3) likely partial payment of the nonsupport divorce debt.

Delay in Discharge

A Chapter 13 case takes a lot, lot longer than a Chapter 7 one. It takes years instead of months. That is, a Chapter 13 case usually doesn’t finish for 3 full years, and often goes as long as 5 years. Contrast that with a Chapter 7 case, which usually takes less than 4 months from filing date until completion.

And you don’t get a discharge of your debts—including the non-support divorce debt(s)—until the end of the case.  Again, that’s 3 to 5 years.

Usually your ex-spouse can’t do anything to collect on that debt in the meantime. So the delay may not be much of a practical problem. But you’re still living in a sort of limbo in the meantime.

If you have other reasons to be in a Chapter 13 case the delay may well be worthwhile. Or if the amount of you non-support divorce debt is very large that alone may make the delay worthwhile. Just be aware of this downside.

Risk of No Discharge

Almost all Chapter 7 cases, especially those in which the person is represented by a lawyer, get successfully completed. But Chapter 13s are riskier. That’s because they involve a monthly payment plan that you and your lawyer put together, it gets court-approved, and then you pay on it for 3-to-5 years. In the right situations a Chapter 13 case can accomplish much more than Chapter 7. But there are more things that can go wrong.

As we said above, you don’t get the discharge of debts until the end of the case. So you have to get to the end successfully to discharge the non-support divorce debt. There’s a risk that you would not get to the discharge.           

Likely Partial Payment of the Non-Support Divorce Debt

The Chapter 13 payment plan referred to above very seldom results in all debts being paid in full. In fact, in some cases you’d pay certain debts nothing before they get permanently discharged. In the majority of cases a non-support divorce debt would get paid in part, but often only a small percentage.

Non-support debts would be treated like all your other “general unsecured” debts. These are all debts that are not secured by collateral and are not “priority” debts (such as recent income taxes) which must be paid in full. All of your “general unsecured” debts are put together into a single pool of debt. The extent to which you’d pay that pool of debt would be based on a bunch of factors, such as:

  • how much you can afford to pay all your creditors per month throughout the length of the case
  • the length of your Chapter 13 plan, generally 3 years or 5, determined by your income
  • the amount of your priority debts, which you paid in full before the “general unsecured” debts get paid anything
  • how much your plan must pay in administrative expenses—the Chapter 13 trustee fees and the attorney fees you did not pay before your case was filed—all paid before paying any of the “general unsecured” debts

As a result sometimes the “general unsecured debts, including your non-support divorce debts, get paid nothing at all. All of your available money is exhausted elsewhere. (This assumes your local bankruptcy court allows such “0% plans”). On the other hand, in rare cases the “general unsecured” debts get paid in full. This is more common when you have little or no priority debts and the general unsecured debts are relatively small. Most of the time your non-support divorce debts get paid a relatively small portion of the total you owe. It depends on all these factors.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Chapter 13 Handles an Income Tax Lien on a Tax that Can’t Be Discharged

August 28th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 13 can be the best way to deal with a nondischargeable tax debt with a recorded lien: it buys more time, protection, and flexibility.

Last week we discussed how Chapter 7 handles a recorded tax lien on a tax that bankruptcy CAN’T discharge. The tax debt already can’t be discharged (legally written off in bankruptcy). So you can’t get out of paying it. The prior recording of a tax lien just adds another reason you have to pay the tax. If you fail to pay the IRS/state can take your assets that are subject to the recorded tax lien.

Filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case can be a better way to handle such a tax debt than a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” one.

Buys Time  

Whether you file under Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 does not affect whether you must pay this tax. But filing a Chapter 13 case can often buy you more time.

After completing a Chapter 7 case you must pay the not-dischargeable tax as fast as the IRS/state demands. Otherwise all the powerful tax collection tools can be used against you. With a recorded tax lien already on your real and/or personal property, the IRS/state has even more leverage against you.

What if you can’t pay the tax as fast as demanded? Among other things the IRS/state could garnish your wages and/or bank accounts, and seize your property.

Chapter 13 could prevent all of that because you’d be given as much as 5 years to pay the tax. You and your bankruptcy lawyer would incorporate that tax debt into your Chapter 13 payment plan. You’d pay the IRS/state along with any other special debts that you must pay. Often, you’d pay only a small portion of your remaining debts. Sometimes you’d pay nothing on such debts. As a result you can focus your financial energies for 5 years on your tax debt.

Buys Protection

During that 5 years (which can be as short as 3 years), your paycheck, your checking/savings and other financial accounts, and your property are protected. Bankruptcy’s valuable “automatic stay” protection from collection lasts only 3-4 months in a Chapter 7 case. But this protection lasts the full 3-to-5 years of your Chapter 13 case. The peace of mind that comes from this extended protection is often invaluable.

Buys Flexibility

Sometimes what you need more than time is flexibility in how you pay a tax debt.

You may have some other even higher-priority debt that your financial future depends on. If you’re behind on a vehicle loan you may need to catch up so you’ll have transportation to your job. Or, if you’re late on child support catching up may be crucial to avoiding wage garnishment. Chapter 13 can let you pay some debts ahead of taxes, even nondischargeable taxes with a recorded tax lien.

Or if you can’t pay the taxes until some event in the future, Chapter 13 can buy you that flexibility. The event can even be a few years into the future. For example, if you plan on selling your house and moving away in two years, say, after a child graduates from high school, you may well be able to delay paying all or most of the tax debt until that house sale.

Conclusion

Chapter 13 can be a much better way to deal with a nondischargeable tax debt with a recorded lien. It often gives you more time to pay it, protects you many times longer than Chapter 7, and gives you flexibility that could be crucial in your unique circumstances.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Chapter 13 AFTER the Recording of an Income Tax Lien

August 13th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 13 protects you from a recorded tax lien in crucial ways, and can reduce how much you pay on the underlying dischargeable tax debt. 

 

Last week’s blog post was about dealing with a recorded tax lien by filing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case.  Usually the IRS’ or state’s recording of a tax lien against you effectively requires you to pay the underlying tax. That’s true even if that tax otherwise qualifies for total discharge—legal write-off in bankruptcy. That’s because a recorded tax lien converts that tax debt from being unsecured to being fully secured by your property and possessions. You pay the tax—sooner or later—to avoid losing what you own.

When Chapter 7 Might Help

Last week we outlined some circumstances in which Chapter 7 might satisfactorily deal with a recorded tax lien. Those circumstances were when the tax lien either failed to apply to any assets you own or the assets were worth much less than the tax debt at issue. For example, the IRS/state may record a lien on your home which in the process of getting foreclosed. If you’re letting the house go then that tax lien has no leverage over you. Your Chapter 7 case would discharge the income tax debt and the subsequent home foreclosure would undo the tax lien.

But these situations are quite rare. Usually a recorded tax lien (or more than one) covers everything you own. Usually the value of your assets encumbered by the lien(s) well exceeds the amount of the tax at issue. Or even if your assets’ value is less than the tax(es) owed, you don’t want to lose those assets. So you have no choice but to pay the tax owed. That’s true even if that tax otherwise qualified to be fully discharged.

However, if filing a Chapter 7 case takes care of all your other debts, maybe that’s okay. It would have been better to file before the tax lien’s recording so you could have just discharged the tax. But if it’s too late for that, clearing the deck of all or most of your other debts so you can concentrate on the tax debt afterwards may be your best option.

When Chapter 13 Could Be Much Better

The last paragraph assumes you could afford to pay the tax covered by the tax lien. But what if after finishing your Chapter 7 case you still didn’t have enough money each month? The protection from creditor collections (the “automatic stay”) you get from filing bankruptcy disappears when the case is over. That’s only about 3-4 months after your bankruptcy lawyer files your Chapter 7 case. With the tax lien putting your assets at risk you’d have tremendous pressure on you to pay the tax. So if you couldn’t afford to pay as fast as the IRS/state would demand you’d have a serious problem.

Filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case could significantly help.

First, the automatic stay protection against the IRS/state usually lasts the 3 to 5 years that a Chapter 13 case takes to complete. That alone greatly reduces the constant tension of being at the mercy of the tax authorities. During the Chapter 13 case your assets that are encumbered by the lien are protected from seizure. And your income and other assets are protected from any other tax collection efforts.

Second, you usually have much more flexibility in your payoff of the underlying tax. You have much more control over the amount and timing of payments on the tax debt. Your monthly Chapter 13 plan payments are based on your realistic budget. In earmarking where the money from those payments goes you can often pay other even more urgent debts (such as catching up on a home mortgage or child suport) ahead of the tax debt. You can sometimes delay paying the tax until some future event, like the sale of your home or other asset.

When Chapter 13 Is Even Better

When the assets covered by the tax lien have no present value, Chapter 13 is particularly powerful.

Consider a tax lien on a home with no present equity beyond the prior liens. After a Chapter 7 case the IRS/state could just sit on that recorded tax lien until you built up equity in the home. You’d pay down the obligations and the property would rise in value until there was equity to cover the tax lien. The IRS/state would have huge leverage over you. But under Chapter 13 the bankruptcy judge would declare that there’s no present equity secured by the tax lien. The tax would effectively be unsecured—as if there was no tax lien. You’d lump that tax debt in with your general unsecured creditors. You would likely pay only a small portion of that tax debt. Often you would actually pay no more into your Chapter 13 payment plan as a result of that tax.

For example, assume you owed $10,000 in dischargeable income tax.  The IRS recently recorded a tax lien on your home for that tax. Your home is worth $250,000, has $5,000 in property taxes, $210,000 on a first mortgage and $40,000 on a second mortgage. Owing $255,000 you have no equity in the home. But as you pay down the property taxes and the mortgage, and assuming the property value increases, there’d soon be equity securing the tax lien. But Chapter 13 allows you to freeze the present equity situation. The tax lien presently does not cover any equity in your home, the tax debt is thus unsecured, and would be treated just like the rest of your unsecured debt. Adding the tax debt to your other unsecured debt would usually result in you paying no more than you would have otherwise.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Chapter 13 Stops the Recording of an Income Tax Lien

July 30th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Chapter 7 and 13 can both prevent the recording of a tax lien. But if the tax qualifies for discharge Chapter 7 is quicker and less risky. 

 

Last week we showed how detrimental the recording of an income tax lien can be for you. It can turn a tax that you could fully discharge (legally write off in bankruptcy) into one you’d have to fully pay. We showed how Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” could prevent recording of the tax lien and could discharge the tax.

How about a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case? Would filing one also stop an income tax lien recording?  If so, what would happen to that tax debt?

Chapter 13’s Automatic Stay

The filing of a Chapter 13 case stops the recording of a tax lien by the IRS or state just like a Chapter 7 would. Any voluntarily filed bankruptcy case by a person entitled to file that case imposes the “automatic stay” against almost all creditor collection activities against that person and his or her property. (See Sections 301 and 362(a)  of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.) Those “stayed” or stopped activities specifically include “any act to create, perfect, or enforce” a lien. (See Section 362(a)(4) and (5).)

So filing under Chapter 13 stops a tax lien recording just as fast and just as well a Chapter 7 would.

But Would Chapter 13 Be Better than Chapter 7?

That depends. It depends at the outset on whether the tax is one that qualifies for discharge. If it does qualify (mostly by being old enough) then a Chapter 7 is actually often better.

Under Chapter 7 the automatic stay protection lasts only the 3-4 months that the case is active.  But that’s long enough since the discharge of the tax debt would happen just before the case was closed. Once the tax debt is discharged the IRS/state could no longer do anything to collect that tax. It would certainly have no further ability to record a tax lien on that tax.

What would happen in this situation under Chapter 13, with a tax debt that qualifies for discharge? It would get discharged like under Chapter 7, but with two big differences.

First, the discharge would happened not 3-4 months after case filing but usually 3 to 5 years later.  The automatic stay protection usually lasts throughout that time, preventing tax collection, including the recording of a tax lien. But that long period of time under Chapter 13 does create more opportunities for things to go wrong. That’s all the more true because throughout that time you have various obligations, such as to make monthly Chapter 13 plan payments. If for any reason you don’t successfully complete your Chapter 13 case, the otherwise dischargeable tax debt still won’t get discharged.

Second, under Chapter 13 you may have to pay part of the tax debt before it is discharged. This is in contrast to usually paying nothing on it under Chapter 7. (This assumes that you’d have a “no-asset” Chapter 7 case—in which all of your assets would be “exempt”, protected.) Whether  you’d pay anything on a dischargeable tax debt in a Chapter 13 case, and if so how much, depends on many factors, mostly the nature and amount of your other debts and your income and expenses. But why risk paying something on a tax debt under Chapter 13 if you wouldn’t have to pay anything under Chapter 7?

So Chapter 7 Is Usually Better at Dealing with a Dischargeable Tax Debt?

The answer is likely “yes” if you focus only on this one part of your financial life.

But you may have other reasons to file a Chapter 13 case. For example, you may owe a more recent income tax debt that does not qualify for discharge, in addition to the one that does qualify. Chapter 13 provides a number of significant advantages in dealing with the nondischargeable tax. These could make Chapter 13 much better for you overall.

Or you may have considerations nothing to do with taxes, such as being behind on a home mortgage, a vehicle loan, or child support. Chapter 13 gives you huge advantages with each of these kinds of debts. Your bankruptcy lawyer and you will sort out all the advantages and disadvantages of each legal option to choose the best one.

 

The Surprising Benefits: Resolving the “Preference” Problem through Chapter 13

April 30th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Avoid the risks or persuading or negotiating with the Chapter 7 trustee by solving your preference problem through Chapter 13. 

 

Our last several blog posts have been about the problem of preference payments:

  • 3 weeks ago we introduced the problem resulting from paying a favored creditor before you file bankruptcy
  • 2 weeks ago we discussed avoiding the problem by delaying filing your case or persuading the trustee to do nothing
  • Last week was about negotiating with the trustee to pay off the preference money yourself

Today we get into how to solve this problem by filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case instead of a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” one.

When Filing a Chapter 13 Case May Be Worthwhile

A Chapter 13 case is very, very different from a Chapter 7 one. For starters, instead of taking about 4 months a Chapter 13 case almost always takes 3 to 5 YEARS.  Using it to resolve a preference is almost never a good enough reason to file a Chapter 13 case.

But Chapter 13 CAN be better than Chapter 7 in many situations. It can accomplish a lot that Chapter 7 can’t. So if you already have a good reason or two to consider a Chapter 13 case, using it to solve a preference problem as well may push you in that direction.

Let’s say you have an expensive vehicle loan that you’re a month behind on. Chapter 13 would allow you to cramdown that loan. That would reduce your monthly payments and the total you would pay. Plus you wouldn’t have to catch up on the missed payment. Yet you’re on the fence as you wonder if the disadvantages of Chapter 13 outweigh these savings. So if you have a preference problem that Chapter 13 would deal with, that could push you into deciding on Chapter 13.

When You Really Need to Use Chapter 13

The Chapter 7 solutions don’t always work:

  • You often don’t have the luxury of delaying your bankruptcy filing enough so that more than 90 days has passed after the preferential payment. (Or a full year has passed, if the payment was to an “insider” creditor)
  • The trustee may pursue your previously paid creditor in spite of your bankruptcy lawyer’s efforts to dissuade the trustee.
  • You may not have the ability to pay off the trustee yourself. Or you may owe too much to pay it off fast enough to satisfy the trustee.

So you’re looking to file bankruptcy and your lawyer advises you that none of these three are going to work. Then, if you want to avoid having a Chapter 7 trustee chasing your prior-paid creditor, consider the Chapter 13 solution.

How Does Chapter 13 Fix a Preference Problem?

Chapter 13 solves the preference problem by enabling you to pay the trustee within your payment plan. You pay enough extra money into your Chapter 13 plan to pay what you would have paid a Chapter 7 trustee. But you have significant advantages in doing it this way.

But first an example to show how this works. Assume you paid off a debt of $2,500 to your sister 60 days before filing bankruptcy. You’d gotten a tax refund and she desperately needed the money. You’d put her off for years and then had promised to pay her from the refund. Now you’re about to have your home foreclosed on so you can’t wait to file bankruptcy. If you filed a Chapter 7 case the bankruptcy trustee would force your sister to return the $2,500. She’d get sued if she didn’t. You absolutely don’t want that to happen. So you file a Chapter 13 case—which you be doing anyway to save your home. Your lawyer calculates your Chapter 13 payment plan to pay an extra $2,500 beyond what you would otherwise need to pay. You pay that extra amount over the course of your 3-to-5-year case. This may increase your monthly payment somewhat, or it may extend the length of your case. But your sister would not have to pay back anything. The trustee would have no need to even contact her.

Advantages of Using Chapter 13

1. When you file a Chapter 7 case hoping to persuade the trustee not to pursue your prior payee, you may not know if that’ll work. Or if you hope to negotiate payments to the trustee, you don’t know if that will work. The trustee may want to try to get the money out of your payee after all. Or your trustee may reject your offer in order to get the money faster from your payee. Using Chapter 13 takes away these risks. The system allows you to use your Chapter 13 plan to pay what’s needed.

2. Chapter 13 gives you much more time to pay what you need to pay. A Chapter 7 trustee’s job is liquidation. He or she is under pressure to wrap up your case quickly, and so will pressure you to pay quickly. Ask your lawyer but generally a Chapter 7 trustee won’t give you more than a year to pay up. And he or she may simply require you to pay it all in a lump sum. In contrast, under Chapter 13 you have 3 to 5 years to pay.

3. You have more control over where the money goes, and when. Chapter 13 is often used to pay creditors that you want to or need to pay. For example, if you owe a recent income tax debt or back child support, it’s much better to have those debts paid through a court-ordered Chapter 13 payment plan.

4. You have more control over when debts are paid. If you have a debt or two that needs to be paid quickly, that can often be paid first. For example, if you need to catch up on a car payment (because it doesn’t qualify for cramdown), your plan may front-load money there. The extra money you are paying because of the preference can be put to better use early in your case.

 

Fully Complying with Your Chapter 13 Case

March 12th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Besides fulfilling the terms of your Chapter 13 payment plan, you may need to make other payments and meet other requirements. 

 

The bankruptcy court’s approval of your payment plan (at the Confirmation Hearing) happens about 2-to-4 months after filing your case. At that point your Chapter 13 case is fully on its way. You likely have about 3 to 5 years altogether to finish the case. Having gotten to this crucial point, there are a few other crucial steps you need to fulfill to successfully finish your case.

Last time we got into three of these:

  • Do your “debtor education”
  • Avoid or defeat “nondischargeability complaints”
  • Pay your Chapter 13 plan payments

Today we lay out two other crucial steps.

Pay Any Obligations NOT Within Your Plan Payment

In many Chapter 13 cases you pay nothing to your creditors except the single plan payment each month. The trustee divides that payment among your creditors as laid out in your court-approved plan. You pay nothing else to any creditor.  

But in other cases, you pay one or more creditors directly. This may be referred to paying “outside the plan.”

To be clear, you are not paying these secretly. Your plan clearly refers to these debts and their payments. So the bankruptcy court approves these payments. They’re just not included within the single monthly plan payment, for various possible reasons. (See the explanation in paragraph 3.1 of the official Chapter 13 Plan form.)

Often these are ongoing payments on secured debts such as home mortgages or vehicle loans. Direct payments are more likely used when you’re current and are simply continuing to make the regular payments. In some jurisdictions it’s considered easier for everybody that you continue to pay such straightforward payments directly to the creditor. Paying them through the trustee is seen as causing too much delay and accounting confusion.

Naturally it’s essential that you know whether all of your creditors are being taken care of through the single plan payment, or whether there’s a creditor or two you need to pay directly. Your income and expense schedules should make that clear, as well as the plan itself. But if you have any doubt, be sure to ask your bankruptcy lawyer.

Do Anything Else Required

Two documents combined—your plan and the Order Confirming Plan signed by the judge—are the law of your case. These documents contain requirements beyond making payments. They include some standard ones that apply to just about all consumer debtors. There may also be some special requirements for you.

The standard requirements usually include:

  • providing the trustee with copies of your annual income tax returns (paragraph 2.3 of the official Chapter 13 Plan form)
  • turning over to the trustee “income tax refunds received during the plan term” (paragraph 2.3 of the official Chapter 13 Plan form)
  • avoid using credit without prior Chapter 13 trustee or bankruptcy court permission

Special requirements can include:

  • a specified deadline to sell an asset
  • permission for you to use an income tax refund for a specific expense, such as a vehicle repair
  • a requirement to report when an unemployed spouse gets employed

Notice that these special requirements often relate to anticipated changes to your income, expenses, or assets. These changes can directly affect your future obligations under your Chapter 13 case. They may well require you to adjust the payment terms of your plan in the future.

Conclusion

It does take consistent effort to complete a Chapter 13 case successfully. But that effort is worthwhile because it gains you tremendous benefits. Chapter 13 provides many tools that Chapter 7 cannot. Through those tools you can likely meet some otherwise impossible goals. Once you’ve decided that these goals are worthwhile, usually the effort will be worthwhile as well. 

 

Examples of Reaffirmation Agreement vs. Chapter 13

January 5th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Here are examples of the reaffirmation of a secured debt (like a vehicle loan) in a Chapter 7 case vs. addressing it in a Chapter 13 case. 

 

The last blog post was about when to reaffirm a secured debt under Chapter 7 and when to handle that under Chapter 13 instead. This kind of comparison of options can get a bit dry. So today we’re demonstrating how it really works with some examples. We change the facts a few times to show when each of these two options makes more sense.

The Initial Facts

Let’s say a guy named Trevor just fell two months behind on his vehicle loan. He’s at immediate risk of getting his car repossessed. He really needs to keep his vehicle to get to and from work. He’s always behind on his vehicle loan because he has so many other debts—mostly medical bill and unsecured credit cards. What’s especially killing him is that he got sued on some big medical bills and is getting his wages garnished.

Trevor sees a good bankruptcy lawyer. She tells him that filing quickly under either Chapter 7 or 13 would stop the repossession. Either option would also permanently stop the paycheck garnishment. He tells her that his brother can give him the money to catch up on the two missed payments.  The brother is only willing to do this if he takes care of his other debts with some kind of bankruptcy solution.

Chapter 7 Reaffirmation If Can Bring Secured Debt Current

Much of the time if you want to keep collateral on a secured debt in a Chapter 7 case you must bring the debt current within a few weeks, and then reaffirm the debt on its original terms. This is particularly true with vehicle loans with the larger national lenders. In other words, you have to agree to remain fully liable on the debt. You have to agree to continue being legally bound by all the terms of the contract. (See our recent blog posts about the risks of reaffirming.)

Trevor has a relatively easy way to bring his vehicle loan current, thanks to his brother. So his lawyer recommends that he files a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Shortly after filing he can bring the vehicle loan current and sign a reaffirmation agreement. With all his other debts being discharged (legally written off), he’ll be able to keep current on his car payments. Problems solved.

If He Can’t Catch Up Fast

But what if Trevor didn’t have his brother’s help? He may not be able to catch up fast enough to be able to reaffirm his vehicle loan. In a Chapter 7 case he has about 2 months after filing—3 months at the most—to catch up. That’s because you usually have to get current before the creditor will let you reaffirm. And you have to reaffirm before the bankruptcy court enters the “discharge order” about 3 months after filing.

Assuming that Trevor didn’t think he could catch up in time, and because he absolutely didn’t want to risk not being able to keep his car, his lawyer would likely recommend Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” filing instead. This would give him many months—maybe even a couple years—to bring the vehicle loan current.

Other Special Debts Encouraging a Chapter 13 Filing

Now also assume that Trevor’s financial pressures had also put him quite a few months behind on his spousal support.  His ex-spouse had actually been quite flexible, letting him skip payments here and there, or send smaller amounts. But once the lawsuit’s garnishments started, his spousal support payments became even more irregular. So, his ex-spouse got fed up and sent the account to the state’s support enforcement agency. Trevor now finds himself $4,500 behind on support, with aggressive collection to start any moment. And a Chapter 7 filing won’t stop the state’s collection of this support.

Trevor’s lawyer tells him that a Chapter 13 filing WILL stop collection for this $4,500 of support. He’d have up to 5 years to bring that current. His Chapter 13 payment plan would be based on what he could afford to pay. That plan would show how he would—over time—catch up on both the vehicle loan arrearage and the support arrearage, while keeping current on ongoing payments.

His lawyer tells Trevor that a possible downside to Chapter 13 is he’d have to pay all that he could afford to his other creditors during 3 years. (5 years if his income is too high based on his state and family size.) But there may be very little—even possibly nothing—going to his other debts if most of his income goes to living expenses and to bring these two special debts current.

Trevor decides on a Chapter 13 case. He will be able to keep his vehicle, catching up as his budget allows. He also has a reasonable way to bring his big spousal support arrearage current. He knows that at the end of the process he’ll be current on these two, and will otherwise be completely debt free.

 

Get a New Financial Start with this New Year

January 1st, 2018 at 8:00 am

Get a new financial start for 2018. Stop creditor pressures immediately, write off all or most debts, and responsibly deal with the rest.

 

An Overall New Financial Start

Get a new start by discharging (permanently, legally writing off) all or most of your debts. If you have mostly consumer or small business debts you have two main choices about how to make this happen.

A New Start with Chapter 7

With Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” you get a new start very fast. As soon as your case is filed most of your creditors can’t collect their debts against you. They can’t go after your money or your property. Then usually about 3-4 months later the bankruptcy court enters an order discharging your debts. As quick as that you become debt-free. The only exceptions would possibly be debts you want to keep and special debts you can’t discharge. Debts you might want to keep could include a vehicle loan or home mortgage. Debts you can’t discharge include recent income taxes, unpaid child and spousal support, and criminal fines.

Imagine if you filed a Chapter 7 case this month. Immediately your creditors could no longer chase you or anything of yours. All or most of your debts would forever be gone by April or May. The remaining critical debt or two you’d be able to handle sensibly. That quickly you’d have a new financial start.

A New Start with Chapter 13

With Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” the new start is more nuanced, but sometimes much better.

Just as with Chapter 7 your creditors can’t take any action to collect their debts as of the moment you file your case. But under Chapter 13 that protection from creditors lasts not just a few months but for years. The final discharge of debts happens much later but in the meantime you can get many benefits unavailable under Chapter 7. You can deal in creative ways with special debts. You often have much more flexibility with secured debts like home mortgages and car loans. Same thing with income taxes and child support arrearages, among others, that can’t be discharged. Plus you get protection from collection actions against any co-signers that you don’t get under Chapter 7.

You finish your Chapter 13 payment plan in usually 3 to 5 years. Whatever debts you have not paid off get discharged. You are debt-free with limited exceptions like a home mortgage you want to still pay.

Under Chapter 13 you get immediate relief and a new start through a reasonable payment plan based on your budget. Then when that plan is done it’s followed by a full new start with (virtually) no remaining debts.

So, if you filed a Chapter 13 case this month, immediately your creditors could not chase you or any co-signers. You’d enter into a doable payment plan to handle your special debts in ways much better than Chapter 7. And when that plan is paid off you’ll have a full new financial start.

 

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