Blog
Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee

Call Today for a FREE Consultation

210-342-3400

Archive for the ‘Bankruptcy Options’ Category

Example of Reaffirmation Agreement vs. Cramdown of Vehicle Loan

January 8th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Here’s an example of the reaffirmation of a vehicle loan in a Chapter 7 case vs. “cramdown” of the debt in a Chapter 13 case.

 

We’re in a series of blog posts about choosing between Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” and Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”  Along these lines two blog posts ago we outlined when to reaffirm a secured debt (focusing on a vehicle loan) under Chapter 7 vs. handling it under Chapter 13 instead. Then last time we gave some examples showing which option works better in different situations.  That focused on situations in which someone had fallen behind on the payments, and/or had a rough payment history. But we didn’t cover the special situation of Chapter 13 “cramdown.”

Today we’ll give an example when cramdown on a vehicle loan may be a good reason to file a Chapter 13 case.

The Background Facts

Let’s say Christina is current on her vehicle loan. She got far behind on all her other debts because of a serious illness for which she was underinsured. She’s healthy now but being so sick hit her hard financially. She has way more debt than she could ever pay off, and she’s being sued by two of her creditors.

She absolutely has to keep her vehicle to be able to get to work and take her son to school. So Christina knows she has to file a bankruptcy case to be able to make payments on her vehicle. She has to act soon because the lawsuits will turn into judgments and then into garnishments of her paycheck.

The Chapter 7 Reaffirmation Option

Her bankruptcy lawyer informs her that a Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing would discharge all her non-vehicle debts. This means she would no longer owe anything on them.

Plus Christina could enter into a reaffirmation agreement with her vehicle lender, and continue paying on that debt. She does not mind continuing to be legally liable on this debt because keeping her car is her highest priority. Plus continuing to pay on the vehicle loan consistent with her original contract would help resuscitate her post-bankruptcy credit record.  

The Chapter 13 Vehicle Loan Cramdown

But now let’s add a few more facts. When Christina bought her car 3 years ago she had a much higher paying job than she has now. The car she bought reflected her relatively high pay. Then, through a combination of bad choices and bad luck she lost her job, became a single mom, and had the car accident.

The result of all this is that vehicle loan’s monthly payments are quite high. They are more than she can afford to pay even without her other debts. This is in part because of her costly childcare and other expenses related to her baby.

Christina’s lawyer informs her that in a Chapter 7 reaffirmation she’d have to pay the vehicle loan’s full monthly payments. But Chapter 13 “cramdown” of that vehicle loan could reduce that monthly payment amount. In fact, cramdown could save her money both short-term and long-term.

IF she qualifies, cramdown essentially allows her to re-write her car loan based on the fair market value of her vehicle.

Qualifying for Vehicle Loan Cramdown

First, cramdown doesn’t do any good for Christina unless her vehicle is worth less than she owes on it. Otherwise no reduction in her monthly payment or in the amount she owes is possible. The less her car is worth compared to what she owes the more cramdown helps her.

Second, cramdown on a consumer vehicle loan only applies if the loan is more than 910 days old at filing. (See the unnumbered “hanging paragraph” right after Section 1325(a)(9) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.) 910 days is about 2 and half years. Since Christina bought her car 3 years ago, she meets this 910-day requirement.

Cramdown Applied

Adding some final facts, assume that Christina’s car is worth $8,000 but she still owes $15,500 on it. The monthly payments were $600 on a 5-year contract. She can realistically afford to pay $275 per month into her Chapter 13 plan payment. Based on her present income, she would have to pay that for 3 years.

Cramdown for Christina would mean that she could pay only $8,000 for her car, plus interest. That interest would often be at a reduced rate. That covers the secured part of her debts—the $8,000 of the $15,500 that she owes.

She would pay the remaining unsecured portion—the remaining $7,500—if and only to the extent that she could afford to do so. That $7,500 would be put into the pool of all her other unsecured debts. That pool would receive any leftover money she pays into her Chapter 13 plan. That means whatever money—IF ANY—after the $8,000 secured debt portion of the vehicle loan, plus interest, plus Chapter 13 administrative expenses (the trustee fees and any remaining attorney fees).

In this case Christina is paying $275 for 36 months, or $9,900. Of that $8,000 plus about $750 in interest would go to her vehicle lender. Virtually all of the remaining $1,150 ($9,900 minus $8,750) would go to her trustee and attorney fees.

So, Christina would end up paying Chapter 13 monthly plan payments of less than HALF her present monthly car payments. ($275 vs. $600). Although the plan payments would extend longer than her car loan would have (3 years instead of 2), the total she’d pay on ALL of her debts would much less than how much she would have paid on just her car if she had filed a Chapter 7 case and reaffirmed on the vehicle loan.  ($9,900 in her Chapter 13 plan vs about $16,500 to reaffirm her vehicle loan.)

Conclusion

So here it looks like Christina could save both monthly and in the long run under Chapter 13 cramdown.  Most importantly, the lower monthly payments would enable her to keep her car when she otherwise couldn’t.

Note that usually there are other considerations affecting the choice between Chapter 7 and 13. Sometimes there are many considerations that need to be weighed against each other. For example, if Christina had a way to get another vehicle—through a relative, perhaps—going through a Chapter 13 just to keep her car may well not be worthwhile. However, if she was behind on a mortgage or taxes, these could be additional reasons to file under Chapter 13. Choosing your best option truly does require looking at your complete financial life with the help of your experienced bankruptcy lawyer.

 

Examples of Reaffirmation Agreement vs. Chapter 13

January 5th, 2018 at 8:00 am

Here are examples of the reaffirmation of a secured debt (like a vehicle loan) in a Chapter 7 case vs. addressing it in a Chapter 13 case. 

 

The last blog post was about when to reaffirm a secured debt under Chapter 7 and when to handle that under Chapter 13 instead. This kind of comparison of options can get a bit dry. So today we’re demonstrating how it really works with some examples. We change the facts a few times to show when each of these two options makes more sense.

The Initial Facts

Let’s say a guy named Trevor just fell two months behind on his vehicle loan. He’s at immediate risk of getting his car repossessed. He really needs to keep his vehicle to get to and from work. He’s always behind on his vehicle loan because he has so many other debts—mostly medical bill and unsecured credit cards. What’s especially killing him is that he got sued on some big medical bills and is getting his wages garnished.

Trevor sees a good bankruptcy lawyer. She tells him that filing quickly under either Chapter 7 or 13 would stop the repossession. Either option would also permanently stop the paycheck garnishment. He tells her that his brother can give him the money to catch up on the two missed payments.  The brother is only willing to do this if he takes care of his other debts with some kind of bankruptcy solution.

Chapter 7 Reaffirmation If Can Bring Secured Debt Current

Much of the time if you want to keep collateral on a secured debt in a Chapter 7 case you must bring the debt current within a few weeks, and then reaffirm the debt on its original terms. This is particularly true with vehicle loans with the larger national lenders. In other words, you have to agree to remain fully liable on the debt. You have to agree to continue being legally bound by all the terms of the contract. (See our recent blog posts about the risks of reaffirming.)

Trevor has a relatively easy way to bring his vehicle loan current, thanks to his brother. So his lawyer recommends that he files a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. Shortly after filing he can bring the vehicle loan current and sign a reaffirmation agreement. With all his other debts being discharged (legally written off), he’ll be able to keep current on his car payments. Problems solved.

If He Can’t Catch Up Fast

But what if Trevor didn’t have his brother’s help? He may not be able to catch up fast enough to be able to reaffirm his vehicle loan. In a Chapter 7 case he has about 2 months after filing—3 months at the most—to catch up. That’s because you usually have to get current before the creditor will let you reaffirm. And you have to reaffirm before the bankruptcy court enters the “discharge order” about 3 months after filing.

Assuming that Trevor didn’t think he could catch up in time, and because he absolutely didn’t want to risk not being able to keep his car, his lawyer would likely recommend Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” filing instead. This would give him many months—maybe even a couple years—to bring the vehicle loan current.

Other Special Debts Encouraging a Chapter 13 Filing

Now also assume that Trevor’s financial pressures had also put him quite a few months behind on his spousal support.  His ex-spouse had actually been quite flexible, letting him skip payments here and there, or send smaller amounts. But once the lawsuit’s garnishments started, his spousal support payments became even more irregular. So, his ex-spouse got fed up and sent the account to the state’s support enforcement agency. Trevor now finds himself $4,500 behind on support, with aggressive collection to start any moment. And a Chapter 7 filing won’t stop the state’s collection of this support.

Trevor’s lawyer tells him that a Chapter 13 filing WILL stop collection for this $4,500 of support. He’d have up to 5 years to bring that current. His Chapter 13 payment plan would be based on what he could afford to pay. That plan would show how he would—over time—catch up on both the vehicle loan arrearage and the support arrearage, while keeping current on ongoing payments.

His lawyer tells Trevor that a possible downside to Chapter 13 is he’d have to pay all that he could afford to his other creditors during 3 years. (5 years if his income is too high based on his state and family size.) But there may be very little—even possibly nothing—going to his other debts if most of his income goes to living expenses and to bring these two special debts current.

Trevor decides on a Chapter 13 case. He will be able to keep his vehicle, catching up as his budget allows. He also has a reasonable way to bring his big spousal support arrearage current. He knows that at the end of the process he’ll be current on these two, and will otherwise be completely debt free.

 

Reaffirmation Agreement vs. Chapter 13

January 3rd, 2018 at 8:00 am

When is it better to reaffirm a secured debt (such as a vehicle loan) in a Chapter 7 case vs. handling it instead in a Chapter 13 case? 

 

The last 5 blog posts in December were about keeping the collateral you want by “reaffirming” the debt. “Reaffirmation” applies only to Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy”cases. (We’ve focused mostly on reaffirming a vehicle loan.) Today we get into keeping collateral (such as a vehicle) instead in a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case. Our main question today: when is Chapter 13 a better way to keep your collateral than Chapter 7?

Rule of Thumb: Chapter 7 unless Need More Help

There are basically two questions:

  1. Would you be able to keep your collateral/vehicle in a Chapter 7 case?
  2. Even if so, would you get a significantly better result in a Chapter 13 case?

1. When You’re Able to Keep the Collateral in Chapter 7

If you are current on your debt payments, you would very likely be able to keep your collateral/vehicle under Chapter 7. You usually have to formally reaffirm the debt. That means you exclude that debt from the discharge (legal write off) that Chapter 7 provides. You continue to be fully liable on that one debt.

Creditors are usually very happy to be singled out this way. You are much better of a credit risk once you no longer owe all or most of your other debts.

Even if you are not current a Chapter 7 reaffirmation works if:

  • you are able to bring the debt current within two or so months after filing, or
  • the creditor is willing to work out the missed payments—give you more time to catch up, put the missed payments at the end of the contract, or even forgive the payments altogether

Chapter 7 also works well in those situations that a creditor is willing to lower the monthly payment and maybe even the total owed. This seldom happens with vehicle loans, except maybe if the vehicle is worth much, much less than you owe.

2. When Chapter 13 Can Give You a Better Result

Even if you CAN keep the collateral in a Chapter 7 case that doesn’t necessarily mean that you should if Chapter 13 would give you a much better result.

If you’re not current on payments, Chapter 13 would give you much more time to catch up. Consider if your creditor is making you catch up immediately before reaffirming, or within a few months after reaffirming. Let’s say you COULD catch up but it would take extraordinary effort to do so. Chapter 13 could give you many months—or maybe even a few years—to catch up. If that would greatly help you that extra time to catch up which Chapter 13 gives you could make its much longer procedure worthwhile. This may be especially true if you have other very pressing debts (child or spousal support, income taxes, etc.).

Whether or not you are current on payments, Chapter 13 can give you a much better result if your collateral is worth significantly less than you owe on it. You can do a “cramdown” when your collateral is NOT real estate but instead “personal property.” Personal property is essentially anything that isn’t real estate, including vehicles, furniture, appliances, electronics, etc.  Without going into detail here, “cramdown” allows you to re-write your loan based on how much your collateral is worth. You can usually reduce the monthly payment and the total you pay, sometimes very significantly. “Cramdown” is available only under Chapter 13, not Chapter 7.

Especially Bad Payment History

As we said earlier, it’s usually in a creditor’s best interest to allow you to reaffirm a debt whenever you are willing to do so. But in rare circumstances a creditor may refuse to allow you to reaffirm the debt and keep the collateral. This may happen if you’ve had an especially bad payment record—consistently been very late on your payments, for example. Or if you’ve failed to maintain insurance. At some point a creditor may just prefer to repossess the collateral, sell it, and to end the relationship. Talk with you bankruptcy lawyer about whether this may be an issue for you if your history sounds like this. He or she likely has experience with your creditor about such matters.

In situations when a creditor may not be willing to let you reaffirm, Chapter 13 may be worth seriously consideration. In a Chapter 13 case the creditor has much less say about whether you get to keep collateral. You and your lawyer put the secured debt into your payment plan, leaving the creditor with limited grounds for objection. It’s true that your prior history may result in some greater restrictions. For example, if you’ve let a vehicle’s insurance lapse before, you can’t let that happen during the Chapter 13 case or you may lose your vehicle.  Also you DO have to comply with the plan that you propose and the court approves. But as long as you do so you’ll be able to keep the collateral and will own it free and clear by the end of the case.

 

Debts Voluntarily Paid in Chapter 7

December 18th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 is usually much better if one of your high priorities is to favor a debt by paying it. You can do so more easily and flexibly. 

 

Our last blog post was about debts that you still pay after a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. These included debts you might WANT to pay as well as those that you are legally REQUIRED to pay.

Today we focus on debts you might want to pay for no reason other than a sense of moral or personal obligation. That is, you’re not paying in order to be allowed to keep some collateral. You’re not “reaffirming” a mortgage or vehicle loan to keep the home or vehicle. (We’ll get into “reaffirmations” next time.)

One reason we’re looking at debts paid out of personal obligation is because how different this is in Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. For reasons we’ll show, it’s legally easy to favor such a debt in Chapter 7. But it’s not practical to do so in Chapter 13.

The Myth about Not Favoring a Debt after Bankruptcy

People have many fears about filing bankruptcy that are based on myths. One myth is that they think they won’t be allowed to pay a debt that they really want to pay.

Like most persistent myths this one is based on something that’s true only in certain limited circumstances. But then people assume it applies to them when it likely doesn’t.

It’s true that in certain circumstances in bankruptcy, debts within the same legal category must be treated the same. Similarly, in a Chapter 13 payment plan all unsecured debts that are not “priority” debts are paid the same percentage.

However, after a Chapter 7 case (by far the most common type) you are completely free to pay any debt that you feel like paying. The Bankruptcy Code is very direct about this: “[n]othing… prevents a debtor from voluntarily repaying any debt.” Section 524(f) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Don’t Avoid Filing Bankruptcy Because You Want to Pay a Debt

So being concerned about wanting to pay a debt for personal reasons is not a reason to not file bankruptcy.

And it’s certainly not a reason to put off seeing a competent bankruptcy lawyer about your options. The job of your lawyer is to listen to your concerns and help you solve them. If one of your priorities is to pay a debt for whatever personal reason, your lawyer will explain your options for meeting this priority. There are usually sensible ways to meet all of your concerns.

Scenarios for Wanting to Pay a Debt

In our experience there are three basic reasons people want to pay a debt they aren’t legally required to pay.

First, they think something bad will happen—legal or personal—if they don’t pay. For example, they want to pay a doctor bill because they think the doctor otherwise won’t be willing to see them anymore. (That is often not be true, so it’s worth asking the doctor’s staff.)

Second, they don’t want the creditor to know about their bankruptcy filing. For example, they’ve borrowed from their father and don’t want him to be disappointed in them.

Third, they simply feel some kind of deep personal obligation to make good on their promise to pay. For example, they want to repay a grandmother because she really needs the money.

If you filed a Chapter 7 case, in each of these types of situations you would likely be allowed to pay that debt while paying nothing on other debts.

Easier to Pay a Personal Debt after Chapter 7

If it isn’t obvious, paying such a personal debt should be much easier after filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case. You don’t have the financial pressure of your other debts, hopefully giving you more cash flow.  So, filing a Chapter 7 case actually helps you pay a debt or two that you really want to pay.

Discharge of the Personal Debt Gives You More Flexibility

Assume that the debt you want to pay is a legally enforceable debt. (It may be a gift or not legally enforceable on some other basis.) If it is a legal debt you’ll need to list it as a debt in your Chapter 7 case. And in all likelihood it will be discharged—you will no longer owe the debt, legally speaking. The choice whether or not to pay it then becomes completely yours. Your creditor cannot legally compel you to pay it.  

This means that you can pay it as slow or as fast as you want. You can pay for a while and then decide that it wasn’t such as good idea to pay it after all. You can pay only if the creditor treats you right—whatever. It’s up to you and whatever is motivating you to pay the debt.

Realize that your creditor should be doubly impressed if you do pay the debt. Not only are you going through bankruptcy in part to be able to pay this particular debt. You are also paying it in spite of no longer having any legal obligation to do so. You might want to tell these things to your creditor to get points for being so good!

Chapter 7 vs. 13 on a Voluntary Debt

We mentioned earlier that you have to pay all regular unsecured debts the same percentage of their debts in a Chapter 13 payment plan. You can’t favor one over the others except for very limited reasons. Feeling a greater moral or personal obligation toward one debt does not count.

AFTER your Chapter 13 case is over you CAN pay anybody as much as you want. If paid everyone 10% of what you owed them, you can arrange to pay one the remaining 90%.

But that’s not very practical in most situations because a Chapter 13 case usually lasts 3 to 5 years. Most creditors aren’t going to want to wait that long to be made whole. A commitment to begin finishing paying a debt so long from now is not going to impress most people. And who knows how you’ll feel that far down the line.

That’s why Chapter 7 makes more sense if one of your high priorities is to favor one of your debts.  Of course you have to weigh that against other reasons to file a Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. This is where you really need your bankruptcy lawyer to help you sort out your priorities so that you choose the best option.

 

Your Paid-Current Home Mortgage in Chapter 7 and 13

November 29th, 2017 at 8:00 am

There are scenarios when you are current on your home mortgage and are dealing with other home-related debts where Chapter 7 works well.

 

You’re current on your home mortgage payment, although you’ve been struggling mightily to keep it that way. You’re thinking very seriously about getting some financial help through bankruptcy. But you absolutely want to keep the home that you’ve fought so hard to keep current.

You’re trying to decide between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13, and are about to see a bankruptcy lawyer. So far you see some advantage in one or the other, or maybe in both. Maybe Chapter 7 is attractive because it seems easier and quicker. Or maybe Chapter 13 looks better because it handles certain of your special debts better. Either way you want to make sure you can keep paying your mortgage so you can keep your home.

How does this work in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13? Today we’ll start with Chapter 7, and get to Chapter 13 later.

Chapter 7

If you’re current on your home mortgage payments you can virtually always keep your home under Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.”

A big set of considerations is whether you are also current on and/or have manageable ways to deal with other debts on your home.

Other Home-Related Debts

There are other debts related to your home that can cause significant problems even if you’re current on your mortgage. Some of these debts are better handled under Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.” Some are tremendously better under Chapter 13. On the other hand some are handled just fine under Chapter 7. How these considerations apply to your situation can often affect which of these two options would be better for you.

These other home-related debts include the following:

  1. Second or third mortgages
  2. Property taxes
  3. Income tax owed with a lien recorded on your home
  4. Judgment with a lien attached to your home
  5. Homeowner association debt with a lien
  6. Child/spousal support unpaid with a lien

Current on or Make Arrangements to Pay Home-Related Debts

Chapter 7 likely makes sense in the following situations with the types of debts just listed above. Generally these are when you’re either current on these debts or can make reasonable arrangements to pay them. We’ll cover the first 3 of these types of debts today and the other three in our next blog post.

1. Second or third mortgages:

Chapter 7 makes more sense if your home is worth than your first mortgage debt balance. (Or the combination of your first and second mortgage balances if you have a third mortgage.) Plus you’re current on your second (and, if applicable, your third) mortgage. If you’re not current you’ll be able to catch up fast enough to satisfy that mortgage lender.

If, however, your home is worth less than your first mortgage, you may be able to “strip” your second mortgage from your home’s title. This is only available through Chapter 13. “Stripping” your second/third mortgage could save you a tremendous amount of money. That would often make Chapter 13 a potentially much better option. (Similarly if you have a third mortgage and your home is worth no more than the first two mortgage balances.)

Also, if you are significantly behind on your second and/or third mortgage but don’t qualify for “stripping” that mortgage, you may need the extra help that Chapter 13 can give in getting caught up.

2. Property taxes:

If you’re current on your property taxes of course you’ll need to stay current. Discharging all or most of your other debts in a Chapter 7 case should make this easier.

If you aren’t current you’ll need to do so quickly or else your mortgage lender will be very unhappy. Even if current on your mortgage, falling behind on your taxes is a separate basis for foreclosure by your lender. If you can’t catch up fast enough on your property taxes to satisfy your lender, you may need Chapter 13 to buy more time.

3. Income tax owed with a lien recorded on your home: 

Usually, under Chapter 7 you have to pay a tax that is backed up by a lien on your home. You also have to pay the ongoing interest and penalties. If the debt is relatively small, and you can make the monthly payments required by the IRS or state, Chapter 7 may be your best option.

However, is the underlying income tax old enough so that it could be discharged if there was no lien? Is there insufficient equity in the home to cover the entire tax lien? In these situations you may avoid paying such a tax, or paying only a portion, under Chapter 13.

(Again, we’ll cover the final three types of debts listed above in our next post in a couple days.)

 

Simple and Not-so-simple Debts in Chapter 7 and 13

November 24th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Very broadly speaking Chapter 7 handles simple debts as well or better than Chapter 13 does, which handles more difficult debts better.


Debts in Bankruptcy

When deciding between Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” and Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” you look at many factors. You have to meet certain qualifications (usually easy to meet) to file either one. The amount of your income, the nature of your assets, whether you own a business, and your immediate and long-term goals—all of these come into play.

But the most important consideration is your debts. Bankruptcy is of course mostly a tool for dealing with your debts. Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 each deal better than the other with certain types and combinations of debts.

Today we get into which of these two consumer bankruptcy options is better for which debt scenarios.

A Helpful Starting Point

Our first sentence gives us a good starting point. Chapter 7 handles simple debts as well or better than Chapter 13 does, which handles more difficult debts better.

So if you have mostly or all simple debts, then Chapter 7 will tend to be better for you. If you have a number of difficult debts, Chapter 13 will more likely be better.

The Different Types of Debts

There are basically three types of debts:

  1. General unsecured—There’s no collateral or “security” tied to these debts (“unsecured”), and they aren’t “priority”—given special treatment in the law. General unsecured debts include most credit cards, medical debts, no-collateral personal loans, utility bills, back rent, and many, many others.
  2. Secured—The debts are legally tied to collateral or with a lien on something of value. Included are home mortgages, vehicle loans, retail debts secured by the goods purchased, personal loans secured against personal possessions, business loans secured by business and/or personal assets—all debts secured by anything you own.
  3. Priority—Simply, debts that the law treats as special for whatever policy reason. The main examples for consumer debtors are recent income and other taxes, and child and spousal support.

These different types of debts are treated differently in Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13.

Debt Scenarios Handled Well by Chapter 7

If ALL your debts are general unsecured debts, Chapter 7 will more likely be your better option. Most general unsecured debts are discharged—legally written off—in a Chapter 7 case. So you file a Chapter 7 case through your bankruptcy lawyer in usually less than 4 months all your debts are discharged. You have your fresh financial start.

Some secured debts are handled reasonably well in a Chapter 7 case. If you are current on a home mortgage or vehicle loan, you can usually keep your home or vehicle by maintaining your payments and “reaffirming” the debt. If you are very close to being current, you may be able to catch up and “reaffirm” as well. If you are surrendering a home or vehicle (or any other collateral) Chapter 7 often works well for that.

Chapter 7 may be appropriate for dealing with certain limited priority debts. If you owe an income tax debt or are behind on child support, discharging all or most of your other debts may enable you to catch up on the tax or support. But you are subject to collection actions by the tax authorities as soon as your Chapter 7 is over. And as for support debt, a Chapter 7 filing does not stop its collection even while your bankruptcy case is active. So if you owe any tax debt that you can’t comfortably pay through a standard IRS/state payment plan, Chapter 13 may be the better option. And if you are behind on child or spousal support, only Chapter 13 can stop the aggressive collection actions that an ex-spouse or support collection agencies can use against you.

Debt Scenarios Not Handled Well by Chapter 13

If ALL your debts are general unsecured debts, Chapter 13 is usually not your better option (assuming you have a choice). That’s because unlike Chapter 7, in a Chapter 13 case you usually have to pay a portion of your general unsecured debts. You pay as much of those debts as you can afford to do so over a 3 to 5-year period. Then the portion you did not pay gets discharged.

It’s important to understand that the general unsecured debts are often paid relatively little in a Chapter 13 case. It’s common that you’d pay only 5 or 10 cents on the dollar, and almost always no interest or penalties. In many parts of the country you can even pay 0 cents on the dollar. That’s because the debtor owes secured or priority debts which use up all the money he or she can afford to pay.

Debt Scenarios Handled Well by Chapter 13

Chapter 13 deals with secured debts often better than does Chapter 7. That’s especially true if you’re behind on a debt with collateral you really want to keep. Under Chapter 7 you’d usually have to get current on a vehicle almost immediately to be able to keep it. You have many months—or even a year or two—to catch up under Chapter 13. If you’re behind on your home mortgage you get up to 5 years to catch up.

Chapter 13 also gives you some very powerful tools for dealing with secured debts unavailable under Chapter 7. You may be able to “strip” a second or third mortgage off your home’s title. You may be able to do a “cramdown” on your vehicle loan or other personal property debt, potentially greatly reducing your monthly payment and the total you pay.

With priority debts, Chapter 13 gives you tremendous power and flexibility. It stops collection of support arrearage, and gives you months or years to catch up—as long as you keep current on ongoing support. With unpaid income taxes Chapter 13 provides many benefits. It prevents future tax liens. It enables you to deal with prior-recorded tax liens extremely well. Chapter 13 gives you up to 5 years to pay taxes that can’t be discharged. Usually throughout that time you pay no ongoing interest or penalties.

Conclusion 

It’s a bit of an oversimplification to say that simple debts lead to Chapter 7 while more complicated ones lead to Chapter 13. But, as we’ve just shown, that’s often the situation.

But just as you are a unique human being, your circumstances are unique. Get the unique assessment of your options that you need from an experienced and empathetic bankruptcy lawyer.

 

Using Time to Your Advantage in Chapter 7 and 13

November 20th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7’s big advantage is that it’s quick. Chapter 13’s big advantage is that it buys you more time to do what you want or need to do.


A Key Distinction-Treatment of Time

We’re starting a series of blog posts about the practical differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Before getting down into the details let’s look at a difference that affects just about everything else—time. These two options deal with time very differently.

Sometimes getting something done quickly is to your advantage. Sometimes getting more time to get something done is to your advantage. Here’s how these play out with Chapter 7 and 13.

Chapter 7—In and Out Fast

If you’re like most people thinking about bankruptcy, you’ve been hurting financially for a long time. Understandably you want to get a fresh financial start fast.

With any kind of bankruptcy you get relief from almost all creditor collection actions the minute you file your case. Then with Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” your debts are discharged less than 4 months from the day you file the case. All or most of your creditors can never again attempt to collect on the debts.

So, you get immediate relief, your creditors are put on hold, and then just a few months later you’re done. You have your fresh start.

Chapter 7—One Point in Time

Chapter 7 bases just about everything on that moment in time when your case is filed. It particularly focuses in on your assets as of that moment. Generally your future assets are not relevant, unless they derive from assets owned as of the date of filing. (Rental income from property you own now would be an exception.)  Future income doesn’t count as present assets, unless it was for work done before filing.

Chapter 7—Short-Lived Automatic Stay

One problem with Chapter 7 is it can be TOO quick, when it comes to protecting you from certain creditors. The “automatic stay” is the name of the protection that kicks in the moment you file a bankruptcy case. That protection lasts only as long as the case is open. In a Chapter 7 case that means only 3-4 months, at the most.

Chapter 7 also gives you no enforceable mechanism for making payments on debts that you want or need to pay. For example, if you’re behind on a mortgage and want to catch up you have to bring it current by whatever terms and timetable the mortgage holder demands. There is nothing in Chapter 7 that compels the mortgage holder to give you more time. It’s the same if you’re behind on a vehicle loan, child or spousal support, or recent income taxes. You have little or no protection, and no power to compel these kinds of creditors to be more flexible.

(Chapter 7 does allow for “reaffirming” secured debts like vehicle loans. But “reaffirmation” doesn’t usually help if you’re behind on payments. It just makes you liable as if you hadn’t filed bankruptcy. And it doesn’t apply to other kinds of not-discharged debts like child/spousal support or income taxes.)

Chapter 13—Stretching Out Time in Your Favor

A quick bankruptcy procedure isn’t always in your favor. So getting in and out of bankruptcy quickly isn’t good if you’re left with ongoing special debts.

That’s not a problem if the surviving debt is one you can readily handle. You may have had trouble keeping up with payments on your vehicle loan. But after discharging all or most of your other debts under chapter 7 you may have no trouble making them. Same thing may be true if you still owe a relatively small amount of nondischarged income tax. You may well be able to pay it off conveniently through a negotiated monthly payment agreement.

Problems occur when the debt that would survive a Chapter 7 case is too large to handle on your own. It’s not at all unusual to have more than one such debt. Then you need the substantial additional time that Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” gives you.

With Chapter 13 you’re not effectively being left on your own to deal with these special debts as under Chapter 7. Instead Chapter 13 can give you up to 5 years of time and protection. You have up to that much time to bring a debt current or to pay it off.

Chapter 13—Flexible Time

Chapter 13 doesn’t just buy you time to deal with those other problems. It buys you flexible time. It does so in three ways.

First, the amount of time it buys flexibly depends mostly on your budget. If your income qualifies you for a 3-year plan, you’re usually allowed to stretch it out longer. If you just need an extra 3 months, or the full 5 years, or anything in between, your personal budget is often the main determinant.

Second, if you have more than one important debt you need to pay, you often have flexibility about that. For example, let’s say you owe back home property taxes and child support, and recent income tax. All of them have to be paid in full before the end of your Chapter 13 case. But the property taxes accrue high interest. The child support you feel morally obligated to catch up fast. The income tax is not accruing interest. Your Chapter 13 payment plan could likely get the property tax and child support caught up before paying anything on the income taxes.

Third, Chapter 13 flexibly keeps your options open. For example, if you’re considering selling your home at some point, your payment plan could schedule that for 3 years into your case. You could keep your plan payments lower until paying a lump sum out of those later home sale proceeds. Or you may be able to leave that potential home sale open-ended, depending on what happens in the meantime.

Conclusion

As you can see, Chapter 7 and 13 each turn time in your favor, depending on what you need. If you don’t have a lot of debt that would not be discharged in a Chapter 7 case, then its quickness can be a big advantage. If you do have debt that would survive, Chapter 13’s length can be a great advantage. It not only buys you time but gives your protection and flexibility for dealing with these special debts.

 

Keep an Open Mind about Chapter 7 or 13

November 17th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Here’s an example why to keep an open mind about filing under Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. Slightly different facts can make all the difference. 

 

Last time we introduced some of the main differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. We suggested that you learn about them but also keep an open mind when you go see a bankruptcy lawyer. At that meeting you will always hear about advantages and disadvantages of each option you didn’t know about. Often you hear for the first time about certain tools that can really help you. So you may end up going a different route than you expected.

Here are two versions of an example that illustrates this well.

An Example Using Chapter 7

Assume the following. Three months after losing a job you get another one at a somewhat lower salary than before.  Over the years before you’d accrued $50,000 in credit card debt and medical bills on which you’d started falling behind. While you weren’t working you fell even further behind and one medical collector has just sued you. You’re now also 2 months behind on your $1,500 monthly home mortgage payments ($3,000). For personal and financial reasons you really want to keep your home.

A Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case would very likely discharge (legally write off) all of your non-mortgage debts. In this example that would enable you—with a short-term tight but realistic budget and a temporary part-time job—to pay one and a half mortgage payments each month ($1,500 + $750) for four months to catch up. Your lawyer contacts your mortgage lender which agrees to that catch-up schedule.

So you decide to file a Chapter 7 case as a means to get current on your mortgage, and to get a fresh financial start. About 4 months after filing the case you’d have both.

An Example Using Chapter 13

Change the facts this time so that now you’re 8 months behind ($12,000) on your mortgage instead of just 2. Also your budget is tighter and no part-time job is available. So without paying any of your credit card and medical debts you can only afford $300 per month. At that rate you would need 40 months to catch up on your $12,000 mortgage arrearage. Your lender says that’s totally unacceptable.

A Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” would give you up to 5 years to catch up on the mortgage. The mortgage lender would generally have to go along with this—be unable to foreclose or take other collection action—as long as you consistently stuck with your plan. You would have to pay all you could afford to every month for at least 3 years. You’d have to pay for 5 years if your income was too high. Either way the money would first go to catch up the mortgage. (This would be after or simultaneously while you were paying your lawyer fees and trustee fees). You would usually only pay the other debts—the credit cards and medical debts) if and to the extent you had money left over during the 3-to-5-year payments period.

Because you really want to keep your home you decide to file a Chapter 13 case. You don’t mind its length because that’s to your advantage—more time to catch up on the mortgage so that you can reasonably afford to do so. About 4 years after filing the case you finish catching up, the remaining debts are forever discharged, and you have a fresh financial start. You owe nothing except the fully-caught up mortgage. It took a lot longer than a Chapter 7 case but saving your home made it well worthwhile.

Conclusion

In both of these scenarios you were behind on a mortgage on a home you wanted to keep. In the first scenario the tools of Chapter 7 enabled you to meet your goal. In the second you needed the stronger tools of Chapter 13.

This is a simplistic example. Even here this illustration show that it’s important to keep an open mind about which Chapter is better for you. Real life is usually much more complicated. That’s all the more reason to get informed about your options and then be receptive about your lawyer’s legal advice about them.

 

Chapter 7 or 13? You May Be Surprised

November 15th, 2017 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 takes about 4 months, while Chapter 13 takes 3 to 5 years, and likely costs more. But that doesn’t begin to answer which is better. 

 

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13

Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” is usually, but not always, for simpler situations. It’s often the right choice if your income is relatively low, your assets are modest, and your debts are straightforward.  You keep all of your assets, all or most of your debts are discharged (legally written off), and if you want you keep paying on your vehicle and/or your mortgage or rent.

Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is usually, but not always, better for somewhat more complicated situations. Your income may be too high to qualify for Chapter 7. You may have an asset or two that is not “exempt”—not protected. Or you may have debts much better handled under Chapter 13. Do you owe income taxes or student loans or a second mortgage? Are you behind on a vehicle loan, home mortgage, property tax, or child or spousal support? These and certain other kinds of debts are often handled much better in a Chapter 13 case.

Overall, these two options each have advantages and disadvantages that need to be carefully matched to you and your goals. Chapter 7 may be able to solve immediate problems and do so quickly. Chapter 13 is more expensive but that can be far outweighed by the money you save over using Chapter 7. In some situations the unique tools of Chapter 13 can save a person many thousands of dollars. Chapter 13 takes so much longer but that length can itself be an advantage. When you need or want to pay a special debt, you can stretch payments out to lower their monthly amount. So it just depends on your personal situation.

Be Flexible When You Meet with your Lawyer

You’re reading this blog post, so we’re glad that you’re working on getting informed about your options. But it’s also important to have an open mind when you go to see your bankruptcy lawyer for legal advice. If you do inform yourself in advance you may tentatively decide which option is best for you. Or you may just not know. It is easy to not be aware of a crucial advantage or disadvantage that could be decisive. So don’t be too convinced about going with one option when the other may actually be better.

Sometime Easy, Sometimes Difficult Choice

The reality is that sometimes it’s pretty clear which option is better for you. Sometimes you only qualify for one of the two. Or your circumstances can push your decision strongly towards either Chapter 7 or 13. In these situations, you may have an easy choice.

But often you qualify for both. It’s not unusual that each gives you some advantages and disadvantages that the other doesn’t. Especially in these situations it’s crucial to know all these advantages and disadvantages in order to make the best choice.  Then it comes down to a deeply personal decision based on what goals and benefits are most important to you.

To Help You Be Informed

It IS good to be as informed as you much as your time and energy allows. This choice between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 is very important. So during the next few weeks we’ll look at the differences between them.

 

The Option of Converting Your Chapter 13 Case into a Chapter 7 One

August 28th, 2017 at 7:00 am

When deciding between Chapter 7 and 13, if you choose a Chapter 13 payment plan realize that converting later to Chapter 7 is an option. 


Chapter 13—Powerful But Comes with Risks

Chapter 13 is a powerful tool. If you have certain special kinds of debts it can help you with those debts in amazing ways. It can enable you to save your home or vehicle, sometimes by reducing how much you need to pay monthly. In some circumstances it reduces what you need to pay on these debts altogether. Chapter 13 gives you power over income tax debts, child and spousal support arrearage, student loans, other obligations against your home, other secured debts, and certain other kinds of debts.

But Chapter 13 also requires a long-term commitment. The payment plan that you and your attorney propose requires looking into the future. It requires predicting your income and expenses for the following 3 to 5 years. It’s more challenging if your income and expenses don’t stay somewhat steady during that time. Life often doesn’t go as expected or hoped.

Considerations

The advantages of Chapter 13 may make sense but they often do involve some risk.

To qualify for Chapter 13 you must be an “individual with regular income.” This means that your “income is sufficiently stable and regular to enable [you] to make payments under a [Chapter 13] plan.” (See Sections 109(e) and 101(30) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.) This requirement of a “stable and regular” income is a broader than it may sound. But it does require you and your bankruptcy lawyer predict your income for the life of your payment plan.

Your bankruptcy court will tend to give you a chance to demonstrate that your income is stable enough for Chapter 13. As long as you have reasonable justification, you are usually given the opportunity to see if you can make the payments you are proposing.

So you may appropriately decide to file a Chapter 13 case to take advantage of its unique powers. But then your income may not end up meeting your expectations, or your expenses may unexpectedly increase. So down the line you may not be able to pay into your Chapter 13 payment plan as you had expected.

You may be able to amend, or “modify” your plan to deal with such financial changes. But that may not always work. Knowing that Chapter 7 is available as a fallback option can be reassuring when deciding to file under Chapter 13.

The Right to Convert to Chapter 7

The Bankruptcy Code explicitly states in Section 1307(a) that a Chapter 13

debtor may convert a case under this chapter to a case under chapter 7 of this title at any time. Any waiver of the right to convert under this subsection is unenforceable.

So, at any point in your Chapter 13 you can switch it into a Chapter 7 one.

However, there are some rather rare situations in which conversion is not so easy. If the bankruptcy court believes that the bankruptcy laws are being abused, conversion may not be allowed. Again, this is rare. Talk with an experienced bankruptcy lawyer about whether and how this might ever apply to you. In general you can assume that you can switch to a Chapter 7 case “at any time.”

The Conversion-to-Chapter 7 Option

Our last blog post discussed some of the disadvantages of voluntarily ending, or dismissing, a Chapter 13 case. You immediately lose protection from creditor collection activities and your debts are not discharged (legally written off).

Conversion to Chapter 7 avoids those disadvantages. The protection from creditors—the “automatic stay”—continues from the prior Chapter 13 case without a break into the new Chapter 7 case. And at the end of the Chapter 7 case, usually about three months after the conversion, most of your debts get discharged.

So, conversion to Chapter 7 can be a decent back-up plan if your circumstances or goals change. As you’re considering the Chapter 13 option, it’s good to know you can later convert into a Chapter 7 case if necessary.

 

Call today for a FREE Consultation

210-342-3400

Facebook Google Plus Blog
Back to Top Back to Top