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Conditions for Stopping Support Collections in Chapter 13

January 19th, 2020 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 immediately stops the collection of past-due child or spousal support. But to keep that protection you must meet some conditions.  


Last week we showed how Chapter 13 stops the collection of unpaid child and spousal support, while Chapter 7 doesn’t. But we ended by emphasizing that anyone can quickly lose this huge benefit of Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts”. Avoiding this requires strictly complying with some conditions. These conditions are arguably sensible ones. But you need to know and understand them so you don’t lose this crucial Chapter 13 benefit. Because these conditions are so important we focus today’s entire blog post on them.

Ongoing Child and Spousal Support

But before we get to these conditions we need to make a strong point. We’re talking here about child and/or spousal support that is unpaid, past-due, at the time of the bankruptcy filing. This past-due support is different from ongoing support. 

Ongoing support is the support you need to keep paying, usually on a monthly basis, after your bankruptcy lawyer files your bankruptcy case. Past-due support is any amount of support that you’re behind on as of that filing date.  Ongoing support is the support due after that filing date.

Filing bankruptcy does NOT stop the collection of any ongoing support, under either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13. The “automatic stay” that protects you from creditor collections does not apply. (See Section 362(b)(2)(B) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code—where ongoing support is called “domestic support obligation.”) So, if you are paying support by direct payments, you need to keep paying those after filing bankruptcy.  If you are paying through a payroll deduction or by garnishment, those should continue. You can only change those forward-looking payments through the divorce court which ordered them.

Chapter 13 only stops the collection of past-due support—which, again, Chapter 7 does not. (Past-due support is also sometimes called support arrears or support arrearage.) So the conditions we discuss now are ones you need to meet to stop the collection of past-due support.

Inform Your Collector of Support

Your bankruptcy lawyer’s Chapter 13 filing will immediately stop the collection of past-due support.  This does assume that either you or your lawyer informs your ex-spouse or the support enforcement agency about your Chapter 13 filing. The automatic stay applies at the moment of filing, but the creditor needs to know about it to be able to comply. Coordinate this with your lawyer.

Most support enforcement agencies understand this special power of Chapter 13 and will comply immediately. Although sometimes it may take some lawyerly persuasion.

Ex-spouses are more likely under the misimpression that your Chapter 13 filing has no effect whatsoever on your support obligation. He or she probably has never heard about this special benefit of Chapter 13 for past-due support. If so, your lawyer will likely contact him or her, or his or her lawyer if there is one, to inform him or her about the law.  

The Conditions to Avoid Collection of Past-Due Support

Once the automatic stay stops collection of past-due support, you’ll lose this benefit if you don’t maintain the following conditions:

1) keep current on your ongoing support

2) show in your Chapter 13 payment plan how you will pay off all the support arrearage during the 3–to-5-year life of the plan

3) consistently make your Chapter 13 plan payments so that you are in fact making continued progress towards paying off the past-due support

4) finish your Chapter 13 case successfully, which includes paying off the entire past-due support

Let’s look at these one by one.

1) Keep Current on Ongoing Support

Assuming you continue to owe ongoing support, you absolutely must keep paying it as long as you are obligated to. Otherwise you’d be going financially backwards instead of forwards. You’d be called on it by the support enforcement agency or your ex-spouse. The very likely result would be that you’d lose the automatic stay protection against collection of the past-due support.

Plus you need to be very strict on the timing. You have to pay the monthly payments precisely by the due dates. Otherwise there’s a good chance that your ex-spouse/support enforcement will inform the bankruptcy court and ask permission to resume collection.

In particular be fully aware of the first support payment due after your Chapter 13 case filing date. For example, if your case is filed on January 25 and your monthly support payments are due on the first of every month, you need to make that first after-filing support payment by February 1. Talk with your bankruptcy lawyer about the timing of your Chapter 13 filing so that you have the funds to pay that first support payment.            

2) Payment Plan Includes Planned Pay-off

Bankruptcy law requires you to pay off all your past-due support during the 3–to-5-year life of the plan. Your Chapter 13 lawyer will make the necessary calculations to show how you will so so. Your monthly plan payments will be based on what you can afford to pay to all of your creditors. Incorporated into those monthly payments is money that will go to pay off the past -due support. You and your lawyer have to show that these plan payments are enough to accomplish this.

Otherwise your ex-spouse/support enforcement agency can object to the plan. He/she/it could also ask for permission to resume collections because the plan would not catch up on the past-due support.

3) Make ALL Chapter 13 Plan Payments 

Your Chapter 13 plan not only has to pencil out correctly, but you also must pay the plan payments timely. Otherwise you’re not doing what you agreed to do in the court-approved plan.  Paying the plan payments on time shows that you are actually making continued progress towards paying off the past-due support.

If you got late on the plan payments, your Chapter 13 trustee could ask that your case get thrown out. (The trustee is the person you pay your plan payments to, and who then pays your creditors.) Or any creditor—including your ex-spouse/support enforcement agency—could do the same. Or could just ask for permission to resume collection.

4) Finish Your Chapter 13 Case

So if you have a good payment plan, and you make all the payments, you’ll eventually complete it successfully. (Your plan very likely has some other requirements and this assumes you comply with them as well.) When you complete your plan, you will have paid off the entire past-due support. So it’s really important that you get all the way to the end of your Chapter 13 case successfully.

 

Purchasing a House after Bankruptcy

January 17th, 2020 at 4:07 pm

Texas bankruptcy attorney, TX chapter 17 lawyer,The American Dream is the belief that anyone can succeed in life as long as they work hard and persevere. For many, success includes purchasing and owning their own home. The process of buying a home can be a confusing process and includes many financial and legal procedures. For those who have gone through bankruptcy at some point in their lives, purchasing a home can be even more difficult and confusing. There may be limitations to how much you can borrow from a lender or how soon you can buy a home, but it is not impossible.

Check Your Credit Report

Before you begin to apply for mortgages, you should pull a copy of your credit report. Your credit report will contain detailed information about your credit history, including your borrowing history and information about your bankruptcy. You should carefully look over this report to make sure that everything is correct on the report and that there are no mistakes that could make your report look more unfavorable than it really is.

FHA Home Loans

If you have filed for bankruptcy, one popular option that prospective homeowners consider is what is called a FHA home loan. A Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan is an attractive option for many people who have gone through bankruptcy because they require low down payments and you do not have to have a high credit score to qualify. The minimum down payment for a FHA loan is 3.5 percent of the price of the home and you only need a credit score of 580 to qualify.

If you filed for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you will have to wait at least two years after the discharge before you can apply for a FHA loan. If you filed for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you can apply for a FHA loan as long as you have made one year of on-time payments.

Questions About Your Bankruptcy? A San Antonio, TX Bankruptcy Attorney Can Answer Them

Buying a home can be a stressful process for anyone, but for those who have recently gone through a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, it can be even more difficult. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we understand how significant owning a home is for many families. Our skilled Boerne, TX bankruptcy lawyers can help you understand the home-buying process after you have filed for bankruptcy. To schedule a free consultation, call our office today at 210-342-3400.

 

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/how-soon-you-can-qualify-for-a-mortgage-after-bankruptcy-4160973

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/072515/buying-house-after-bankruptcy-it-possible.asp

https://www.credit.com/blog/2014/10/how-soon-can-i-buy-a-house-after-bankruptcy-or-foreclosure-98939/

Unpaid Child and Spousal Support in Chapter 13

January 13th, 2020 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 DOES stop the collection of unpaid child or spousal support from your after-filing income and other assets. Chapter 7 does NOT.    

Last week we discussed situations in which Chapter 7 would help if you’re behind on child or spousal support payments. We made clear that Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” provides only limited help. Mostly it gives you relief from your other debts so that you can concentrate on catching up on support.  Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” is a much more powerful option when Chapter 7 is not enough.

The Main Benefits of Chapter 13 When Behind on Support

Chapter 13 takes much, much longer than Chapter 7, and is generally more expensive. But it provides some remarkable benefits compared to Chapter 7. These benefits can make the longer time and greater expense of Chapter 13 more than worthwhile. The main benefits of Chapter 13 are that:

1) Filing Chapter 13 immediately stops the collection of unpaid child or spousal support. Chapter 7 does not.

2) Chapter 13 gives you a relatively flexible and protected way to catch up on the support. With Chapter 7 you have to make your own payment arrangements, without any protection or much leverage.

Basically, have a serious conversation with your bankruptcy lawyer about Chapter 13 if you need these significant benefits.

How Does Chapter 13 Stop the Collection of Unpaid Support?

Chapter 7 is a very straightforward kind of bankruptcy. It focuses on a point in time: the moment your bankruptcy lawyer files your Chapter 7 case. Your case essentially imagines your financial life frozen in time at that moment, including your debts and assets, income and expenses, and such.

Chapter 13 also cares a lot about your financial life at the moment of filing. But it also takes a longer view—the next 3 to 5 years of your court-approved payment plan. In particular, Chapter 13 is designed to protect you during that period of time from your ongoing creditors.

Chapter 7 mostly just writes off (“discharges”) certain debts and does not discharge others. It leaves you on your own to deal with those debts you still owe, such as support.

In contrast, in Chapter 13 the protection from creditors—the “automatic stay”—can last the full 3-to-5 years.  Specifically regarding spousal and child support owed at the time of filing, the automatic stay protects your employment income earned after the filing. This means that as of your filing date your paycheck is protected from wage garnishment or other kinds of forced payment.

Why Doesn’t This Happen under Chapter 13 But Not 7?

Here’s the legal answer. (You can skip this section if you don’t need this level of detail.)

The pertinent federal bankruptcy statute states that the automatic stay does not stop the collection of support out of “property that is not property of the [bankruptcy] estate.” See Subsection 362(b)(2)(B) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.  This means that a bankruptcy filing does stop the collection from property that is “property of the bankruptcy estate.”

In a Chapter 7 case the bankruptcy estate is essentially everything you own at the moment of filing the case. See Subsection 541 of the Bankruptcy Code on “Property of the estate” generally. This does not include what you earn and assets you acquire after that moment. Since those after-filing earnings and assets are not “property of the estate,” they can be targeted for support collection.

Chapter 13 is different for a simple reason: “the estate” does include after-filing earnings and assets. Only under Chapter 13 the estate includes “earnings from services performed by the debtor after the commencement of the case.” See Subsection 1306(a)(2).

This means that the automatic stay legally prevents your ex-spouse or support enforcement agency from continuing or starting to collect on your unpaid child or spousal support you’re your after-filing earnings the moment your bankruptcy lawyer files your Chapter 13 case. This is true even though a Chapter 7 filing would have absolutely no such effect.

This Chapter 13 Protection Comes with Important Conditions

We said that the automatic stay can last the entire 3-to-5-year period of your Chapter 13 payment plan. But especially when it comes to unpaid support that protection comes with some conditions.

Why are there conditions? Imagine the example of a vehicle loan. You want to keep the vehicle and prevent your lender from repossessing it. The automatic stay can protect your vehicle under Chapter 13 during the entire length of the case. But you have to meet some reasonable conditions like making payments and keeping the vehicle insured. If you don’t, the creditor can get the court to exclude the debt from being covered by the automatic stay. It can get permission to repossess your vehicle after all.

It’s similar with child and spousal support debt. Here the conditions are very time sensitive and are often enforced very strictly. Being able to stop support collection is a huge benefit of Chapter 13. It may even be a major reason for choosing this more time-consuming option. You don’t want to lose this benefit because you didn’t clearly understand and comply with the conditions.

Because of how important these conditions are, we’ll dedicate all of next week’s blog post to them.

 

Unpaid Child and Spousal Support in Chapter 7

January 6th, 2020 at 8:00 am

Chapter 7 does not stop the collection of child or spousal support, nor provide any procedure to pay the support. It may still help enough.  


If you are behind on child or spousal support payments Chapter 7 may or may not be a good solution.

Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” is the most common type of consumer bankruptcy case.  It is more likely to be a sensible solution if 1) the support isn’t being collected aggressively and 2) you don’t owe terribly much. Why? Because:

1) Filing Chapter 7 does not stop collection of unpaid child or spousal support. Chapter 13 can.

2) Chapter 7 does not give you a procedure for catching up on the support. Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” does so.

So why would you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy if you were behind on support?

Filing Chapter 7 When Owing Support

Chapter 7 is usually the most straightforward type of bankruptcy. A case lasts only about 4 months from when your bankruptcy lawyer files it to when it’s completed. A Chapter 13 case involves a formal payment plan that almost always takes 3 to 5 years to finish.

As mentioned above Chapter 13 can stop the immediate collection of unpaid support, and give you time to catch up.

The much quicker Chapter 7 makes sense if you don’t need these kinds of help.

If you stopped paying the debts that Chapter 7 would discharge, could you quickly catch up on support? Would your ex-spouse be willing to accept monthly catch-up payments at an amount you could afford? Or if the debt is being collected by a support enforcement agency, would it accept such voluntary payments? Could you reliably make such payments, while presumably keeping current on the ongoing monthly support?

If you have a feasible way along these lines to catch up on your support obligation during and after your Chapter 7 case, then it may well be your best option.

Other Advantages and Disadvantages of Chapter 13

But you and your bankruptcy lawyer will discuss two other considerations revolving around your other debts.  Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 deal with debts quite differently.

The first consideration is about debts secured by your assets or other ones that you must pay. Secured debts include home mortgages, vehicle loans, and any others with a lien on anything you own. Debts you must pay—besides support—include recent income tax debts. Chapter 13 often handles these kinds of debts much better than Chapter 7. Without getting into the details here, Chapter 13 protects you while you pay such special debts as your budget allows. If you have such debts, how Chapter 13 helps with those may be reason enough to choose that option. Or this, along with the benefits it gives you with unpaid support, may swing you in that direction.

The second consideration is about the rest of your debts—those that are neither secured nor ones you must pay.  These are your “general unsecured” debts. Usually you can discharge (legally write off) all or most of such debts in either Chapter 7 or 13. In most Chapter 7 cases you pay nothing on your general unsecured debts. However, In a Chapter 13 case you often pay a portion of these debts. Whether and how much you pay on your general unsecured debts depend on lots of factors. The biggest factors are your income and expenses and the amount of your special debts (secured and otherwise) that you are paying in full. So you need to weigh the benefits of Chapter 13 regarding your unpaid support and other special debts against the likelihood that you would be paying something instead of nothing on your general unsecured debts.

What Happens to Your Unpaid Child/Spousal Support Debts in a No-Asset Chapter 7 Case?

A “no-asset” Chapter 7 case is one in which everything you own is covered by property exemptions. Exemptions usually allow you to keep certain dollar values of assets in various categories. Most Chapter 7 cases are “no assets” ones. If yours is, you’re able to keep everything (with the exception of collateral you decide to surrender).

In a no-asset Chapter 7 case your bankruptcy trustee does not get any of your assets to liquidate and pay to any of your creditors. (That’s why it’s called “no asset.”) Your bankruptcy lawyer will tell you if yours is expected to be.

Since the trustee doesn’t collect any money to pay your creditors anything, your support debts also receive nothing. So, a support debt gets no money directly from a no-asset Chapter 7 case. You have to deal with the support debt yourself (perhaps with the help of your lawyer), and be prepared to do so right away.

 

A Chapter 13 Plan to Pay Income Tax

December 30th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Here’s an example of a Chapter 13 payment plan to pay income tax, showing how you pay what you can afford and avoid some interest, penalties. 

 

Today we put the facts of last week’s blog post into a Chapter 13 plan, showing how it actually works. You’ll see how Chapter 13 saves you money and avoids stress as you pay off your priority income taxes.

The Example: The Tax, Interest, and Penalties

Assume you owe $10,000 to the IRS for income taxes from the 2016 tax year. That’s for the tax alone without the penalties and interest. Plus you owe interest of $1,200 (currently 5% annually), $2,000 for a failure-to-file penalty (which the IRS assesses  at 5% per month of being late), and $1,650 for a failure-to-pay penalty (calculated at 0.5% per month). So including the current interest of $1,200 and a total of $3,650 in penalties this $10,000 tax has turned into a total debt to the IRS of $14,850. And the interest and failure-to-pay penalty just keep on accruing.

As we showed two weeks ago, this relatively recent $10,000 income tax itself can’t be discharged (written off) in bankruptcy. You’d have to figure out a way to pay it after completing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case. In a Chapter 13 case you pay that amount through your court-approved payment plan.

The Tax and Interest vs. the Penalties

In either a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 case the $1,200 in accrued interest has to be paid in full as well. The interest continues accruing nonstop during and after a Chapter 7 case. The difference is that interest effectively stops accruing under Chapter 13. You don’t have to pay any interest beyond the case filing date as long as you successfully complete your case.

The situation is usually the same with any penalties that accrue beyond the bankruptcy case filing date. Under Chapter 7 the penalties continue to accrue, during the case and after it’s completed. Penalties keep getting added on until the tax is paid in full. But under Chapter 13 the penalties generally stop accruing. This is true as long as the IRS did not record a lien on this specific tax before you filed the Chapter 13 case.  (Prior-recorded tax liens create a number of complications that we don’t get into here.)

So, in a Chapter 7 case (or outside of bankruptcy altogether) you’d have to pay the full $14,850 of tax/interest/penalties. Plus the interest and penalties would continue to accrue until you finished paying off the entire debt. If you’d pay it off slowly in an extended monthly payment plan, the additional interest and penalties would be substantial. Conceivably you could end up paying around $20,000 for the $10,000 tax.

In contrast, in a Chapter 13 case you may only pay the $10,000 tax plus prior-accrued $1,200 of interest. Assuming no tax lien and a successfully completed 0% Chapter 13 case, you’d be paying about $11,200 instead of as much as $20,000. (In a 0% case there’s no money for the general unsecured debts.)

The Chapter 13 Plan

To keep this explanation as straightforward as possible, assume you owe this IRS tax debt and only other simple debts. That is, all your other debts are “general unsecured” ones. They are not secured—such as a vehicle loan, home mortgage, and a debt with any other collateral. They are not special, priority debts like unpaid child support or other recent tax debts. Chapter 13 is actually often very good at handling multiple secured and priority debts. In fact it’s often the very best tool if your situation is complicated with such other tough debts. But for the sake of this example we focus on how Chapter 13 handles this single income tax debt.

So assume you have a lot of medical bills, credit cards, and/or other general unsecured debts—say $90,000 total. Your prior accrued income tax penalties of $3,650 are also general unsecured debts, so now the total is $93,650. This plus the 2016 tax-plus-interest amount of $11,200 means you have just under $105,000 in debt. Here’s how a Chapter 13 plan with these debts could look like.

You and your bankruptcy lawyer would put together your monthly budget. Let’s say that after subtracting you and family’s reasonable living expenses from your monthly income, you’d have $385 per month left in “disposable income.” That would not even come close to paying monthly payments on your $105,000 or so of debt.

The Great Result Here

But this $385 amount would be enough—just enough—to pay off your IRS debt in full in just 3 years. $385 for 36 months is enough to pay off the $10,000 base tax, plus the $1,200 in already accrued interest. It would also pay a relatively modest amount of Chapter 13 trustee’s fees (generally a set percentage of whatever you pay into your payment plan) and your own attorney’s fees (whatever you didn’t pay before filing your case). The law usually allows (indeed requires) these “administrative costs” to get paid before the general unsecured debts receive anything.

So in this example $385 per month for 36 months would pay off the $11,200 priority portion of your tax debt. ($10,000 + $1,200.) But beyond that there would not be any money for the general unsecured debts. This means there would be nothing for the $3,850 in prior accrued tax penalties.

As a result all of your “disposable income” during the 3 years of the plan would go just to pay the tax and prior interest. (Plus the mandatory “administrative costs.”)  Then after the 36th month of payments, your Chapter 13 plan would be finished. At that point all of your general unsecured debts would be legally discharged. This includes the $3,850 in prior tax penalties. In addition, the IRS would then wipe off its books any penalties and interest that would have accrued since the date of your Chapter 13 filing.

After only paying the $10,000 tax plus $1,200 in prior interest, you’d owe the IRS nothing. You’d also be free and clear of all the rest of your debts. After paying only as much as your budget allowed for 3 years, you’d have a completely fresh financial start.

 

Can You Incur More Debt During a Chapter 13 Repayment Plan?

December 27th, 2019 at 12:38 am

debtIf you have gotten a bankruptcy, the one thing you do not want to do is to incur more debt; being unable to pay your debt is the reason you filed for bankruptcy, right? Chapter 13 bankruptcy repayment plans usually last anywhere from three to five years, meaning you must be financially responsible during that time period or you could risk having your case dismissed and being responsible for repaying your debts in full. While it is a good rule of thumb to avoid taking on any further debts during a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, sometimes taking on more debt is unavoidable and is a necessity. Incurring new debt during your Chapter 13 repayment period is possible, but there is a certain way you must go about it.

Reasons for Incurring New Debt

Sometimes, life can be unpredictable. Even though you were probably not planning on taking on any new debts during your Chapter 13 repayment period, things can happen and can put you in a situation where there is no other option. Generally, incurring new debt during a Chapter 13 repayment period is frowned upon and is only permitted when the debt is for something that is considered a necessity. Common reasons for incurring debt during a repayment plan include:

  • Refinancing a mortgage on your current home
  • Purchasing a new home or a new vehicle
  • Financing equipment needed for necessities, such as a new water heater or furnace

Filing a Motion to Incur Debt

Before you take on any new debt, you must speak with your bankruptcy trustee about filing a motion to incur debt. If you were to take on new debt without notifying the court or your trustee, you could risk having your bankruptcy case dismissed, leaving you in an arguably worse financial situation than before. To file a motion to incur debt with the court, you will need to provide the following information:

  • Proof of income for at least the past 60 days
  • An updated list of your monthly expenses
  • Information about the loan and the financing company, including how much the loan is for, the interest rate of the loan, the length of the repayment period and how much the estimated monthly payment would be

The court will examine your motion and make a determination on whether or not the debt is necessary, whether or not you will be financially able to make the monthly payments and whether or not the new debt will interfere with your ongoing bankruptcy repayment plan.

Contact a San Antonio, TX Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Attorney For Assistance

Making the decision to file for bankruptcy can be a difficult one, but it can ultimately end up being the best financial decision you make for yourself. If you are currently in a Chapter 13 repayment plan, you likely know that there are limitations to what you can do with your money. If you need to incur debt during your repayment period, you need help from a Schertz, TX Chapter 13 bankruptcy lawyer. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we can help you correctly file a motion with the bankruptcy court to allow you to take on more debt during your repayment period. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.carsdirect.com/auto-loans/what-s-an-authorization-to-incur-debt-with-a-chapter-13

https://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy/bankruptcy-basics/chapter-13-bankruptcy-basics

 

Paying Income Taxes through Chapter 13

December 23rd, 2019 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13’s advantages in paying off your priority income taxes become clearer when you see what you don’t have to pay.

 

Last week we got into the advantages of paying priority income taxes through a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case. Those are the usually-recent income taxes which cannot be written off (“discharged”) in bankruptcy. Today we show more clearly how Chapter 13 can be tremendously helpful with income taxes.

The Example: The Tax Breakdown

This example expands on one we introduced last week. Assume that you owe $10,000 to the IRS for income taxes from the 2016 tax year.

In addition there’s a failure-to-file penalty of $2,000 for filing 4 months late without getting an extension. The IRS assesses that penalty  at 5% per month of being late. So here, 4 months at $500 per month = $2,000.

Plus there’s a failure-to-pay penalty of $1,650. That’s calculated at 0.05% each calendar month or partial month that the tax remains unpaid. So here, 33 months or partial months from the April 2017 payment due date to December 2019, at $50 per month = $1,650. (Note that this penalty is reduced to 0.025% per month if you’re in an IRS payment plan.)

You also owe interest on the unpaid tax. It’s more complicated to calculate because the rate changes. It’s been at 5% per year since April 1, 2018 and 4% for two years before that. Plus it compounds daily. To keep it simple, assume for this example that $1,200 of interest has accrued on the $10,000 tax owed.

So combining these, assume you owe $10,000 in 2016 income tax, plus $3,650 in penalties ($2,000 + $1,650), plus $1,200 in interest, a total of $14,850 owed to the IRS for this tax year.

The Tax and Interest vs. the Penalties

1. Accrued interest. If an income tax does not qualify for discharge (under the rules discussed last week), neither does the interest. So during a Chapter 13 case you’d have to pay the tax and the interest (accrued up to the date of bankruptcy) in full. In our example that’s the $10,000 in straight tax plus the $1,650 of interest, or $11,650.

2. Accrued penalties. But the accrued penalties are quite different. These are usually not treated as priority debt but rather as general unsecured debt. (This assumes there’s no recorded tax lien on the tax, which could make the debt partly or fully secured.) In a Chapter 13 case you pay general unsecured debt only to the extent you can afford to do so. This is AFTER paying all priority and appropriate secured debts. Often you don’t have to pay general unsecured debts, including tax penalties, much. It’s not uncommon that you pay nothing.

In our example the $3,650 in penalties is general unsecured debt. So during the course of your 3-to-5-year case you pay this portion only as much as you can afford. You may pay nothing.

3. Ongoing interest and penalties. Usually you don’t pay any ongoing interest or penalties on the tax during the Chapter 13 case. The IRS continues to track it. But as long as you finish the case successfully you will not have to pay any of it. This lack of ongoing interest for 3 to 5 years saves you a lot of money. It also often enables you to end your case more quickly.

Filing the Chapter 13 Case

Now assume you filed a bankruptcy case on December 10, 2019. You were in a hurry to file because the IRS was threatening to garnish your paycheck. The 2016 income tax is not discharged in bankruptcy because it’s  less than 3 years from the tax return filing deadline of April 15, 2017 and the December 10, 2019 filing date.

If you filed a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” that would have provided only limited help. It would have stopped the IRS’s garnishment threat for 3 or 4 months while the Chapter 7 case was active. Then if discharging your other debts would free up enough cash flow so that you could reliably get on an installment payment plan with the IRS to pay off the $14,850 reasonably quickly, then Chapter 7 might make sense.

But that’s a big “if” which doesn’t happen often in the real world.  And even if this scenario were possible, you’d likely pay much more than under Chapter 13. After a Chapter 7 case, you’d have to pay the $3,650 in accrued penalties in full (instead of only in part or not at all under Chapter 13). Interest, and the failure-to-pay penalty, would continue accruing non-stop, until paid off. This adds to the amount you eventually have to pay. Each time you’d make a payment, part would go to that month’s new interest and penalties. So you have to keep paying longer.

Chapter 13 Instead

We’ve explained why his situation should play out much better under Chapter 13. But we’ll show how it actually works over the course of a payment plan in our blog post next week.

 

Priority Income Tax Debts under Chapter 13

December 16th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 gives you huge advantages for paying off your priority income tax debts. You’re protected while you pay what you can afford.


Last week we discussed the advantages of paying priority debts through a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case. We referred to recent income taxes as one of the most important kinds of priority debt. Today we show how Chapter 13 can greatly help you take care of recent income tax debts.

Recent Income Taxes Can’t Be Discharged

The law treats some, usually more recent, income tax debts very differently than other, usually older, income tax debts. Generally, new income taxes are “priority” debts and can’t be discharged (written off) in bankruptcy.

There are two conditions determining whether a tax debt can be discharged. (There are a few other conditions but they are not very common so we don’t address them here.) Bankruptcy does NOT discharge an income tax debt:

1. if the tax return for that tax debt was legally due less than 3 years before you file your bankruptcy case (after adding the time for any tax return-filing extensions) U.S. Bankruptcy Code Section 507(a)(8)(A)(i).

OR

2. if you actually submitted the tax return to the IRS/state less than 2 years before you file the bankruptcy case. Bankruptcy Code Section 523(a)(1)(B)(ii).

Two Examples

Assume you filed a bankruptcy case on December 10, 2019. You owe income taxes for the 2017 tax year. The tax return for that tax was due on April 17, 2018 (because of a weekend and holiday). (This assumes no tax return filing extension.) That’s much less than 3 years before the December 1, 2019 bankruptcy filing date. So, no discharge of the 2017 tax debt, because of the first 3-year condition above.

As for the second condition above, assume again that you filed your bankruptcy case on December 10, 2019.  This time change the facts so that you submitted the tax return late for the 2015 taxes, on October 1, 2018. That’s less than two years before the December 10, 2019 bankruptcy filing date. So because of the second condition above, taxes due for 2015 would not get discharged in bankruptcy

Meeting either of the two conditions makes the tax debt not dischargeable. In the second example immediately above, more than 3 years had passed since the deadline to submit the tax return. (The 2015 tax return was due on or about April 15, 2016.) But less than two years had passed since the actual submission of the tax return. So, no discharge of the tax debt.

With no discharge, you would have to pay that income tax debt after finishing a Chapter 7 case. But there are advantages of paying this priority debt in a Chapter 13 case.

Advantages of Paying Priority Income Tax Debts in Chapter 13

Under Chapter 13:

  1. You are protected from aggressive collection by the IRS/state not for 3-4 months as in Chapter 7 but rather 3-5 years.
  2. This includes preventing any new recorded tax liens, and getting out of any installment payment plans.
  3. The amount you pay monthly to all your creditors, including the priority tax, is based on your actual budget. It’s not based on the often unreasonable requirements of the IRS/state.
  4. The amount your priority tax gets paid each month (if any) among your other debts is flexible. You do have to pay all of the priority tax debt(s) by the time you finish your Chapter 13 case. That’s up to a maximum 5 years. But other more urgent debts (such as catching up on a home mortgage) can often get paid ahead of the taxes.
  5. Usually you don’t pay any ongoing interest or penalties on the tax during the Chapter 13 case. That takes away the need to pay it quickly. Plus the lack of additional interest and penalties significantly reduces the amount needed to pay off the tax debt.
  6. If the IRS/state recorded a tax lien against your home or other assets before you filed bankruptcy, Chapter 13 provides a very efficient and favorable forum to value and pay off that secured portion of the priority debt.

 

What Debts Are Not Dischargeable in a Texas Bankruptcy?

December 13th, 2019 at 9:46 am

TX bankruptcy attorney, TX chapter 7 lawyerFiling for bankruptcy is often the last resort for many people. If you successfully file for bankruptcy and your debts are discharged, it can affect your current and future finances for years, which is why people do not typically get a bankruptcy unless they absolutely have to. For most forms of bankruptcy, receiving a discharge of your debts is typically the end goal. Most debts can be discharged or forgiven in a bankruptcy, but there are certain types of debts that either cannot be discharged or will not be discharged based on certain circumstances.

Student Loans

When it comes to student loan debt, it is almost never automatically discharged in a bankruptcy. If you are looking to have your student loans forgiven, you must prove to the court that making your student loan payments would cause you undue hardship. To do this, you have to prove that making your student loan payments would not allow you to maintain a minimal standard of living, you will likely be in a tight financial situation for the remainder of your student loan repayment period and you have made a decent number of payments in good faith on your loans.

Taxes

For the most part, federal, state and local taxes are not dischargeable in bankruptcy. However, there are certain situations in which you may be able to have your tax debts forgiven if you file for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. To do this, you must prove that all of the following five criteria are true:

  • The tax return in question was due at least three years ago;
  • The tax return was filed at least two years ago;
  • The IRS assessed your tax at least 240 days prior to the filing of the bankruptcy;
  • Your tax return was not fraudulent; and
  • You are not guilty of tax evasion.

Domestic Support

Domestic support that you owe to a spouse or child will never be discharged in a bankruptcy. If you have a legal obligation to pay spousal support or child support payment, you will still be held to that obligation after a bankruptcy.

Consult With a San Antonio, TX Bankruptcy Discharge Attorney

Getting a bankruptcy, whether that bankruptcy is a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, can be a fresh start for most because of the ability to have your debts discharged or forgiven. If you have certain specific types of debt, you may not be able to have those discharged in a bankruptcy. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we can help you analyze the types of debt that you are in and determine whether or not you would be able to have those debts discharged if you were to file for bankruptcy. Let our Kerrville, TX bankruptcy discharge lawyers help you make the right decisions for your financial future. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.thebalance.com/what-is-non-dischargeable-in-a-bankruptcy-case-316130

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/n/nondischargeable_debt.asp

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/11/523

Priority Debts in a Chapter 13 Case

December 9th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 gives you some huge advantages over Chapter 7 for paying your priority debts. You’re protected while you pay what you can afford.


Priority Debts under No-Asset and Asset Chapter 7

Our last two blog posts described how Chapter 7 can sometimes be a sensible way of dealing with priority debts. (Those are ones you can’t “discharge”—legally write off, the most common being recent income taxes and child/spousal support.) Our blog post two weeks ago: a no-asset Chapter 7 case discharges all or most of your other debts. So then afterwards you can better afford to pay your priority ones. Last week: in an asset Chapter 7 case your bankruptcy trustee collects your unprotected asset(s). He or she then pays part or all of your priority debt out of the proceeds from selling those asset(s).

But Chapter 7 is not well-designed to deal with priority debts in many situations. Here are the main problems:

  • You get only brief protection, or none at all, from your priority creditor(s). With income taxes, the IRS/state can resume collections when your Chapter 7 case is over. That’s only 3-4 months after you and your bankruptcy lawyer file the case. With child/spousal support, there is no protection at all: collection continues even during your Chapter 7 case.
  • Because of this lack of legal protection, you have little or no leverage about the dollar amount of payments you pay on your priority debts. You are largely at the mercy of the IRS/state or the support enforcement agencies.
  • In an asset Chapter 7 case, you have no control over the trustee’s sale of your asset(s). Plus you have to pay a significant amount for the trustee’s costs and fee. That reduces what goes to your priority debt(s).

The Benefits of Chapter 13

In contrast, Chapter 13 is well-designed for you to deal favorably with your priority debts. Here are its main benefits and advantages.

1. Ongoing Protection, for Years

The protection from creditors called the automatic stay lasts not 3-4 months but rather 3-to-5 years in Chapter 13. You can lose this protection under Chapter 13, if you don’t follow the requirements. But usually this sustained protection is a very powerful tool. It gives you tremendous peace of mind. It forces otherwise very aggressive creditors like the IRS/state and support enforcement to cooperate. It gives you an incredible and practical second chance to do what you need to do. Instead of these tough creditors having the law and the leverage on their side, Chapter 13 puts you much more in charge.

2. Pay Monthly What You Can Afford to Pay

The practical leverage Chapter 13 gives you helps where it counts. It enables you to pay your priority debts under sensible and manageable payment terms. Priority debts are ones you have to pay regardless of bankruptcy. You mostly just wish that there was a way to do so that was doable. Chapter 13 fulfills that wish.

Here’s how it works You and your bankruptcy lawyer propose, and the bankruptcy judge approves a payment plan. (This approval comes after possible input from the Chapter 13 trustee and your creditors.) This payment plan is mostly based on how much you can actually afford to pay the pool of your creditors. You have to pay all your priority debts in full, but you have 3 to 5 years to do so.

You generally pay nothing on your other unsecured debts until you pay your priority debts in full. Sometimes you don’t pay anything on those “general unsecured” debts. At the end of your case whatever you haven’t paid is forever discharged. At that point you will have paid off your priority debts in full, and usually owe nothing to anybody.

3. Avoid Interest and Penalties

You can often avoid paying any interest or penalties on your priority debt(s) under Chapter 13.

For example, with recent income taxes, interest and penalties continue to accrue after you file your case.  But as long as there no prior-recorded tax lien, and you successfully finish your case, you don’t pay these additional interest and penalties. You only pay the initial priority tax debt.

Furthermore, in most situations the penalties that accrued before your Chapter 13 filing are not a priority debt. This portion of your tax due at the time of filing is treated as “general unsecured.” This means it’s treated just like your unsecured credit cards or medical bills. You only pay it to the extent you have money available after paying the priority debts, if at all.

This combination—no accruing interest and penalties, and no penalties treated as priority—can significantly reduce how much you must pay. The less you have to pay as priority means the less you pay in your Chapter 13 payment plan. The less you have to pay usually means you finish your plan quicker. It’s more likely to last closer to 3 years rather than 5 years. And if you have to pay less there’d be less pressure to pay more per month to get it done on time.

4. Pay Priority (and Secured) Debts Ahead of (and Instead of) Other Debts

If you have secured debts you have to pay—a vehicle loan or home mortgage arrearage, for example—you often can pay these ahead of the priority debts. Your priority debts generally just have to wait, as long as you are appropriately following the payment plan.

This flexibility, and being able to essentially force priority creditors to be this flexible, can be extremely beneficial to you. You not only get to pay your important priority debts ahead of your other unsecured debts. You often get to favor debts that are very important to you—for example, to save your home and/or vehicle—ahead of the priority debts. You do have to pay the priority debts in fully before you can finish your Chapter 13 case. But often you are allowed to fit those payments in only after paying your crucial secured debts.

 

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