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Writing Off Debts with Bankruptcy

February 11th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy is about writing off or “discharging” debts. The timing of discharge is quite different in Chapter 7 and 13; both are permanent.  


The main goal of most consumer bankruptcy cases is to get a fresh financial start through writing off debts.  In bankruptcy the legal term for write-off is “discharge.”

In virtually all successful Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” and Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” cases there will be a discharge of some or all of your debt.

In Chapter 7

People file Chapter 7 cases mostly to get a quick discharge of their debts. That is, the discharge of those debts that can be discharged, and that they want discharged.

Most debts qualify for discharge. We’ll dig into those that don’t next week.  In the meantime Section 523 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code covers “Exceptions to discharge.”

You may not want to discharge certain select debts that are secured by something you want to keep. Possible examples are your vehicle loan and home mortgage. You may want to formally “reaffirm” such debts—agree to continue to be liable in return for keeping the collateral. See Section 524(c) of the Bankruptcy Code. You definitely want to discuss thoroughly whether you should reaffirm any of your debts with your bankruptcy lawyer.

The big benefit of Chapter 7 is speed. Most cases finish within 4 months of filing, and do so with a court order discharging your debts. Rarely, the debtor has to give up some asset(s) to get the discharge. Here is an official Chapter 7 Order of Discharge that would come at the end of the case.

In Chapter 13

The road to discharge is much longer under Chapter 13. Plus most, though not all, cases require paying something to your creditors before discharge.

Whether and how much you pay depends on a bunch of circumstances. Chapter 13 involves proposing and getting bankruptcy court approval of an official plan of payments. That plan usually gives you 3 to 5 years to do what you need to do. Often that includes paying special debts such as “secured” and “priority” ones that handles for you much better than under Chapter 7. The “general unsecured” debts usually only get paid any money that’s left over. (See our last blog post for descriptions of these 3 main categories of debt.)

Only after your successful completion of this payment plan do you get a discharge of all or most of your remaining debts. Here is an official Chapter 13 Order of Discharge that would come at the end of the case.

What Is the Exact Legal Effect of the Discharge of Debts?

If you look at either the Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Order of Discharge linked to above you’ll notice in both the pertinent language is extremely short and sweet:

IT IS ORDERED: A discharge under [the pertinent section of the Bankruptcy Code] is granted to [the debtor].

The legal effect of this discharge is described in Section 524(a)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code as follows:

“A discharge… operates as an injunction against the commencement or continuation of an action, the employment of process, or an act, to collect, recover or offset any such debt as a personal liability of the debtor…  .”

What does this mean? There’s a short Explanation of Bankruptcy Discharge in the two Orders of Discharge linked to above, with both containing the following language:

Creditors cannot collect discharged debts

This order means that no one may make any attempt to collect a discharged debt from the debtors personally. For example, creditors cannot sue, garnish wages, assert a deficiency, or otherwise try to collect from the debtors personally on discharged debts. Creditors cannot contact the debtors by mail, phone, or otherwise in any attempt to collect the debt personally. Creditors who violate this order can be required to pay debtors damages and attorney’s fees.

The discharge court order is permanent, and the injunction that flows from it is permanent. Because of the penalties, most creditors are careful to comply. If you have any indication that any of your creditors is not complying, tell your bankruptcy lawyer.

 

Our next blog post will get into the special kinds of debts that may not get discharged.

Types of Debt in Chapter 13 Bankruptcies

February 8th, 2019 at 11:01 pm

TX bankruptcy lawyerThere is more than one type of bankruptcy, although Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies are the most common. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, your attorney and a team of other professionals are able to help you develop a repayment plan to pay back your debts. The repayment plan lasts for three to five years, depending on a variety of circumstances. Chapter 13 bankruptcies can be beneficial to individuals because it allows you to keep certain assets, such as your vehicle or your home. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, certain debts must be repaid before other debts.

Priority Debts

Priority debts are exactly what they sound like — priority over other debts. These debts must be included in any repayment plan you enter and the plan must make sure that your priority debts are paid off first and in full. Typically priority debts include:

  • Past-due child support;
  • Past-due spousal support;
  • Unpaid taxes; or
  • Unpaid wages that you owe employees within the past six months.

Secured Debts

Debts that can be secured by certain property are called secured debts. These types of debts are called secured debts because they can be attached to specific property. If you fail to repay the debts as agreed, the creditor can take back the property. The most common examples of secured debts include:

  • Home loans or mortgages; or
  • Car loans.

Unsecured Debts

Unsecured debts are basically all other debts that you may have. Unsecured debt has no property that can be attached to it, so there is nothing that the creditor can repossess if you do not pay. Common examples of unsecured debt include:

  • Medical bills;
  • Credit card debt;
  • Personal loans;
  • Utility bills; and
  • Business loans.

A Texas Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Attorney Can Help

United States bankruptcy law is extremely complex and is best handled by a professional. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we have dealt with over 20 years worth of bankruptcy cases and we know the ins and outs of the bankruptcy process. Our skilled New Braunfels Chapter 13 bankruptcy lawyer can help you sort out your finances and come up with a repayment plan that works for you. To get started reviewing your case, call our office at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Source:

https://www.uscourts.gov/services-forms/bankruptcy/bankruptcy-basics/chapter-13-bankruptcy-basics

 

Your Debts in Bankruptcy

February 4th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Bankruptcy is about debts. Different categories of debts are treated differently. The categories are secured, priority and general unsecured 


Your debts are the reason you are reading this. You want to know how bankruptcy would deal with your debts.

  • Will bankruptcy write off all your debts?
  • Can you keep paying some of your debts like a vehicle loan or home mortgage to keep that vehicle or home?
  • What happens to special debts that you can’t write off like child support and some income taxes?

To answer these and other similar questions we start by getting to know the 3 legally different categories of debts: 

  • secured
  • priority
  • general unsecured

Your rights and obligations, and those of the creditor, are different with each category of debt.

Secured Debts

Each of your debts is either secured by something you own or it is not. A secured debt is backed up by a lien, a legal interest of the creditor in some kind of property of yours. See Section 101(37) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Usually you know whether a debt is secured. For example, in a vehicle loan the vehicle’s title states that your lender is the lienholder. That lien on the title makes the loan secured by the vehicle. That, together with the security agreement you signed, gives the lender certain rights over your vehicle.

Sometimes you don’t know whether a debt is secured. For example, most purchases on major credit cards create a debt that is not secured by whatever you purchased. But some card purchases—such as on some retail store affiliated cards—do create a secured debt. The paperwork that came with your card (which you’ve likely thrown away!) should tell you. Your bankruptcy lawyer will also likely know, or can find out.

Occasionally, a creditor wanted the debt to be secured but it isn’t because the creditor messed up. It didn’t take the legal steps required to make that happen. This could mean that you don’t have to pay the underlying debt and still get to keep the property at issue.

A debt could also be only partially secured. If you owe $10,000 on a vehicle worth only $6,000, the debt is partially secured. It’s secured as to the $6,000 value of the vehicle and unsecured as to the remaining $4,000 of the debt. (See Section 506 of the Bankruptcy Code.) In the right circumstances you would not need to pay the full $10,000 debt and could still keep the vehicle.

Priority Debts

The law has selected some debts to be treated better than others, each for certain specific reasons. For example, child support payments are given many advantages, both inside and outside bankruptcy, because legislatures have decided that paying child support is an extremely high societal priority.

Priority debts are themselves prioritized within their different types. The higher-priority priority debts are treated better than the lower-priority one. Here’s a list of the most common priority debts for consumers or small business owners in order of priority:

  • child and spousal support
  • certain wages and other compensation owed to a debtor’s employees
  • certain (usually more recent) income taxes, and some other kinds of taxes

Priority debts are important in bankruptcy for a practical reason. Often only certain debts get paid, or get paid more than other debts. So a priority debt may get paid in full while other debts get paid little or nothing. We’ll explore how this works in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 in our upcoming blog posts.

General Unsecured Debts

All debts that are not secured are unsecured debts.  “General” unsecured debts are just unsecured debts that are also not priority debts. So if a debt is not secured and does not fit any of the priority debt types, it’s general unsecured.  

Most people considering bankruptcy have mostly (and sometimes only) general unsecured debts. These include every possible way you can owe a debt. Examples include: most credit cards, just about all medical debts, personal loans without collateral, NSF checks, payday loans without collateral, unpaid rent and utilities, older income taxes, repossessed vehicle balances, most student loans, and other contract or legal claims against you.

Previously secured debts sometimes become general unsecured ones. One example: after a vehicle gets repossessed and sold, any remaining debt is a general unsecured one. Also, previously unsecured debts sometimes get secured. A general unsecured credit card balance can become secured by your home if the creditor sues you, gets a judgment, and records a judgment lien against your home.

 

Starting next week we’ll show how these different categories of debts are treated in bankruptcy.

 

If You Owe Both 2018 AND Earlier Income Taxes

January 28th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Do you owe income taxes for the 2018 tax year AND already owe for one or more tax years? Chapter 13 may be an especially good tool for you. 


Last week we got into a big advantage of filing a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case in early 2019. It enables you to include 2018 income taxes into your Chapter 13 payment plan. That would:

  1. Save you money on payment of your 2018 tax
  2. Give you invaluable financial flexibility
  3. Stop any present and future tax collections and the recording and enforcement of a tax lien on the 2018 tax

So Chapter 13 is a helpful tool for dealing with taxes you owe for the 2018 tax year. Sometimes it’s even absolutely indispensable—it solves a debt dilemma that appeared otherwise insolvable.

When You Also Owe Income Taxes for Earlier Years

However, Chapter 13 is a particularly powerful tool if you owe not just for 2018 but for other tax years (or year) as well. This is true wherever you stand with the earlier tax debt, whether:

  1. the IRS/state is now aggressively collecting the taxes
  2. you are currently paying them through an agreed monthly payment plan
  3. you haven’t yet filed the tax returns for the prior years 

1. Dealing with Aggressive Collection of Earlier Tax Debt

Is the IRS/state is currently collecting the earlier taxes through garnishment or some other collection procedures?  Then Chapter 13 would very likely greatly help you with both those earlier taxes and the new 2018 one.

The minute your bankruptcy lawyer files the Chapter 13 case for you all the aggressive tax collection actions will stop. That is the power of bankruptcy’s “automatic stay.” You will have 3 to 5 years to deal with ALL of your debts through a payment plan. This includes all your income taxes. The Chapter 13 payment plan will be based on what you can genuinely afford to pay. You may well not need to pay some of your earlier taxes. You will likely not need to pay any more accruing interest and penalties on ANY of the income taxes. You will not need to worry about tax collections throughout the time you’re in the case—including the recording of tax liens. At the completion of your case you will owe no income taxes. Indeed, you will be debt-free altogether, except for voluntary debt such as a home mortgage.

2. In a Monthly Payment Plan

Are you already in a payment plan with the IRS/state for the prior tax debt? If so, finding out that you owe even more for 2018 can be really frightening.

Those monthly installment payments likely contributed to the fact that you owe for 2018. You know that you have to keep up those monthly payments perfectly to avoid the IRS/state from starting or restarting collection actions against you. So you do everything you can to pay them, including not having enough withheld from your paycheck or not paying enough in quarterly estimated payments for the next year’s taxes. As a result you now owe another bunch of taxes for 2018.

Furthermore, you know that you’ll violate your installment agreement if you don’t stay current in future income taxes. As stated in IRS Form 9465, the Installment Agreement Request form, “you agree to meet all your future tax obligations.” So you know you’ll be in trouble when the IRS/state finds out that you owe for 2018.

Chapter 13 avoids this trouble. As mentioned above, the “automatic stay” immediately protects you from the IRS/state. Your monthly installment plan is cancelled right away. You make no further payments on it once you file you file your Chapter 13 case. All your prior income taxes AND your 2018 one(s) are handled through your Chapter 13 payment plan. You get the financial advantages and the peace-of-mind referenced in the above section. When you successfully complete your Chapter 13 case you’ll be totally free of any tax debt.

3. Not Filing Tax Returns

You may be in the scary situation that you can’t pay your taxes so you don’t file your tax returns.

Sometimes this happens because the tax authorities are already actively trying to collect on earlier tax debt. You can’t pay the earlier debt so you figure what’s the use of adding to the amount you already can’t pay.

Or you may be in an installment payment plan and you don’t want to violate it by admitting you owe more for 2018. You know you’ll be in violation of it upon filing the 2018 tax return, so you simply don’t do so.

Or finally, you haven’t filed a tax return for several years, and you know or guess you owe a lot. Now it’s time to file for 2018 and you figure you’ll owe again. You think, why file for 2018 and bring the wrath of the tax authorities onto yourself?

But you know that not filing your 2018 tax return (and any prior unfiled ones) only delays the inevitable. Because of the advantages listed in our last blog post and in the above two sections, Chapter 13 may well be the tool you need.

You’re in a vicious cycle in which you may well be falling further behind instead of getting ahead.

Chapter 13 can likely enable you to break out of that cycle. Not only do you deal with all of your taxes and other debts in a single package. Not only to you often not have to pay all of your taxes. The vicious cycle is broken because your Chapter 13 budget will also address your 2019 and future income tax situation. It does so because your new budget will include enough withholding or quarterly estimated payments so you can stay current for 2019 and thereafter. Again, you should end the Chapter 13 plan being completely tax-debt free.

 

Can I Discharge My Student Loans in Bankruptcy?

January 25th, 2019 at 10:48 pm

bankruptcyThere are over 44 million young adults in the United States who currently have student loan debt. Those 44 million people owe a combined total of $1.52 trillion, with the average borrowing being $37,000 in debt by the time they graduate. Student loan debt is a rising issue, especially since many have trouble making their payments. One of the most searched questions online is, “Can I discharge my student loans in bankruptcy?” In short, no, you usually cannot, but as with many things, there are a few exceptions to that rule.

The Brunner Test

In 1998, a law was passed that stated you could not discharge student debt unless you could prove that repaying that debt would cause you undue hardship. In 2005, that law was extended to all types of student debt, including private student loans.

Proving undue hardship can actually be quite difficult. The test that is most commonly used in court to determine whether or not you would be experiencing undue hardship is called the Brunner Test. The test is actually quite simple and consists of three elements. These are:

  • Making student loan payments would not allow you to maintain a minimum standard of living because of your current income and expenses;
  • You have extenuating circumstances that make it likely that you will be in the same financial situation for most of the duration of the repayment period; and
  • You have attempted to repay the loan by seeking alternative repayment options and limiting your expenses as much as possible.

This is the basic formula that most courts will use to determine if you are experiencing undue hardship. Some courts will take into account other facts, like age, income, health, other financial circumstances and other factors.

A New Braunfels Bankruptcy Lawyer Can Help You Choose Your Best Course of Action

It can be difficult to know when you need to file for bankruptcy. There are many other options for student loan repayment than a bankruptcy. For federal loans, there are income-driven repayment plans and many private loan servicers will also work with you to create a repayment plan. Bankruptcy should be used as a last resort, but sometimes it is necessary. If you are thinking about filing for bankruptcy, contact us at the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee. Our skilled Kerrville bankruptcy attorneys can help you go over your finances and choose which type of bankruptcy would be best for your situation. Call our office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2019/01/09/student-loans-bankruptcy-discharge/#3230fc0e6d56

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2018/06/13/student-loan-debt-statistics-2018/#774d1c7310fa

https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/student-loans/student-loans-bankruptcy/

Include 2018 Income Taxes in a Chapter 13 Case Filed in 2019

January 21st, 2019 at 8:00 am

Do you expect to owe income taxes for the 2018 tax year? Starting January 1, 2019 you can wrap that tax into a new Chapter 13 payment plan. 

 

Have you been considering filing bankruptcy and now also expect to owe income taxes for 2018? If so, the start of 2019 gives you more reason to file a Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts” case.

Why? Because filing in 2019 allows you to include 2018 income taxes into your payment plan. That gives you major advantages:

  1. Saves you money on your payment of the 2018 tax
  2. Gives you some very valuable flexibility
  3. Stops tax collections and a tax lien on the 2018 tax

1. Save Money

Wrapping your 2018 income tax debt into a Chapter 13 payment plan usually allows you to pay no more interest and penalties on that tax. The savings can be much more than you think.

You’ll have to pay the 2018 base income tax itself in full, but usually not the interest or penalties. The base tax itself is a “priority” debt that you have to pay. But almost always no interest or penalties accrue on that tax (as long as you finish the case successfully).  

This especially helpful because practically speaking you’d probably not pay that 2018 tax for quite  a while:

  • If you don’t file bankruptcy your other financial pressures would likely prevent you from paying that tax quickly. You might even be tempted to put off filing the tax return, thereby aggravating the problem. The interest and penalties would accrue fast.
  • If you do file a Chapter 13 case in your payment plan you’d most likely pay other even higher priority debts ahead of the 2018 tax. There’s a good chance that tax wouldn’t get paid until near the end of your 3-to-5-year plan. A huge amount of interest and penalties would accrue in the meantime.

2. Valuable Flexibility

Wrapping your 2015 taxes into a Chapter 13 payment plan gives you tremendous flexibility in paying the tax. This can be a real game changer, especially when you have other financial obligations that can’t wait. Chapter 13 allows you to delay paying your 2018 tax debt until you can afford doing so AFTER paying, for example:

  • home mortgage arrearage to save your home
  • unpaid real property taxes, which usually accrue interest at a high rate
  • vehicle loan arrearage or “cramdown” payments to keep your vehicle
  • child or spousal support arrearage
  • other years’ income taxes, including protecting a home or other possession from previously recorded liens

3. Stop Future Tax Collection Including Liens

An important benefit of waiting until 2019 to include the 2018 income tax debt is to stop its aggressive collection. Filing a Chapter 13 case prevents the IRS and/or state from taking just about any collection actions on that tax. This protection against collection stays in effect throughout the years of the case (as long as you fulfill your obligations). Not having to worry about collection of this debt is a huge emotional and practical benefit.

It’s especially nice not have to worry about getting hit with a tax lien. Tax liens are dangerous for a number of reasons. They put your precious assets at risk, thereby giving the IRS/state tremendous leverage. Chapter 13 prevents tax liens while giving you the means to pay off the tax on a relatively flexible budget.

 

Filing Chapter 13 in 2019 to Write Off More Income Taxes

January 14th, 2019 at 8:00 am

Chapter 13 is a riskier, longer, and maybe more expensive way to escape a dischargeable income tax debt—but may still be your best option. 


Last week we showed how to permanently write off (“discharge”) more of your tax debts through Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy.” Today we show how to do this with Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”

Why Use Chapter 13 If Chapter 7 is Faster and Cleaner?

Chapter 7 is a very fast way to discharge an income tax debt that qualifies for discharge. You would very likely no longer owe the tax only about 4 months after filing a Chapter 7 case.

But Chapter 13 case could be much better for you than Chapter 7 for other reasons. Those other reasons may outweigh the benefit of discharging your dischargeable tax debt quickly.

You may owe some other income tax debt(s) which do not meet the conditions for discharge. These other taxes that may be too large to pay off reasonably through a monthly payment plan with the IRS/state.  The other taxes may not qualify for an Offer in Compromise or other settlement. You may well save money and avoid significant risks by handling all of your taxes in a Chapter 13 case.

There are also many other reasons that Chapter 13 would be worthwhile for you, reasons not involving income taxes. It may save your home from foreclosure or your vehicle(s) from repossession. Chapter 13 can deal with a child or spousal support arrearage much better than Chapter 7. There are many other situations where Chapter 13 gives you extraordinary and unique powers. So it can be worthwhile overall in spite of its disadvantages in dealing with a dischargeable tax debt.

How Does Chapter 13 Deal with Dischargeable Income Taxes?

Determining whether a particular income tax debt can be discharged in Chapter 13 is the same as in Chapter 7. Please see our last blog post for the conditions of discharge. These conditions mostly involve how long it’s been since the tax return for the tax at issue was due and when the return was actually submitted to the IRS/state. Sometimes there are other pertinent conditions, but usually it’s just a matter of timing.

Because of how the timing works, there are certain points of time in 2019 when a tax that hadn’t earlier qualified for discharge would then qualify. Again, see our last blog post about those crucial times happening this year.

If your tax does meet the conditions for discharge, it can get discharged in your Chapter 13 case. But this works quite differently than under Chapter 7.

One key difference is that under Chapter 13 there’s a good chance that you would pay something on your dischargeable tax debt.

Under Chapter 13 dischargeable income tax debts is treated like the rest of your “general unsecured” debts. Under your payment plan all such debts get paid the same percentage of their total amounts. That percentage may be any amount from 0% to 100% of their amount, depending on your budget and other factors.

Consider two situations: First, if you have a “0% plan” then you’d pay nothing on the dischargeable tax just like in a straightforward Chapter 7 case. Second, even if you do pay some percentage, often that actually doesn’t increase the amount you pay into your payment. We’ll explain these two situations.

A 0% Payment Plan

In some Chapter 13 cases all the money that the debtor can afford to pay goes to special creditors. All the money going into the Chapter 13 payment plan goes either to secured or to “priority” debts. These would include home mortgages, vehicle loans, nondischargeable taxes, child and spousal support, and such. These usually have to be paid in full before the “general unsecured” debts receive anything.  So during the 3-to-5-year payment plan no money goes to the dischargeable income taxes. That’s a 0% Chapter 13 plan.

Assuming the bankruptcy approves the plan, and you successfully complete it, at its conclusion the dischargeable taxes get discharged, without you having to pay any of it.

Payment Plans Which Do Not Increase the Amount You Pay

In many Chapter 13 plans the amount available for the pool of the “general unsecured” debts is a fixed amount. That amount is based on what you can afford to pay over the required length of the plan. (That required length is usually 3 or 5 years.) That fixed amount does not change regardless how much in “general unsecured” debts you owe. The amount just gets distributed to all those debts pro rata. The more you owe in “general unsecured” debts the lower the percent of the debts that fixed amount can pay.

For example, assume you can afford to pay the pool of “general unsecured” debts a total of $2,000 during the course of the payment plan. All the rest of the money you pay into the plan is earmarked for secured and “priority” debts. Assume also that you have $20,000 in unsecured credit card and medical debts and $5,000 of dischargeable income tax. Without the income tax, the $2,000 would be paid towards the $20,000 in “general unsecured” debts, resulting in a 10% plan. ($2,000 is 10% of $20,000.) Now when you add in the $5,000 tax, there’s a total of $25,000 of “general unsecured” debt. $2,000 is 8% of $25,000, resulting in an 8% plan.

You would be paying no more—the fixed amount of $2,000—over the length of your plan. The fact that you owe the $5,000 in dischargeable tax would not increase the amount you would pay. Then at the successful completion of the case all remaining “general unsecured” debts, including whatever was remaining on the dischargeable tax, would be forever discharged.

Conclusion

So you see that Chapter 13 is a slower and somewhat riskier way to discharge an income tax debt. Plus you may have to pay a portion of the tax instead of quickly discharging all of it under Chapter 7. But then again you may not have to pay anything on it, as described above. In any event, the delay and risks may well be worthwhile. Your bankruptcy lawyer will help you weigh all the advantages and disadvantages so that you can make the right choice.

 

How a Texas Bankruptcy May Help Stop a Home Foreclosure

January 11th, 2019 at 11:35 pm

Texas bankruptcy lawyerIf you own a home, you are one of the millions of Americans who are lucky enough to have achieved the American Dream. The scary part is, you can have that dream taken away from you if you fall on hard times. Foreclosure is a very real thing that happens to households every day. Fortunately, you have a few options that you can choose from if you find it difficult to make payments on your home. The options available to you will depend on whether your financial distress is temporary or more permanent. If you are just temporarily having issues paying your mortgage, you can look at options such as a renegotiated repayment plan or forbearance. If your financial distress is more permanent, you can consider bankruptcy as an option to help you.

Automatic Stays and Bankruptcies

When you file for bankruptcy, all creditors, collection agencies, government entities and other people you may owe money to must cease to contact you about your debts. This is what is called an “automatic stay” and it can prevent the bank from taking action against you if you have an outstanding balance on your mortgage. The automatic stay begins the moment you file the paperwork for bankruptcy and prevents the bank from trying to start the foreclosure process on your home or if the process has already been started, the automatic stay prevents the process from moving any further. The length of the automatic stay depends on the type of bankruptcy you choose to file but lasts as long as the bankruptcy lasts.

Different Bankruptcies Produce Different Results

Chapter 7: This type of bankruptcy is one in which all of your debts are eventually forgiven, though it should only be used as a last resort. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy almost always results in a liquidation of your assets, meaning you will probably end up losing your home. If you do not see a way that you will be able to pay off your mortgage in the future, this may be your only option.

Chapter 13: This is the more permanent solution to help you save your home. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy will result in a repayment plan for all of your debts, including your mortgage. The repayment plan will allow you to spread out the past-due amount on your mortgage over three to five years. After the repayment plan is finished, you will be caught up on your mortgage, granted you must still pay your normal monthly mortgage payment.

A New Braunfels Bankruptcy Attorney Can Help You Fight to Keep Your Home

The thought that your home could be taken from you is a very scary one. If you are behind on your mortgage and you think a foreclosure could be on its way or you are already in the foreclosure process, you should seriously consider filing for bankruptcy as an option to help you keep your home. At the Law Offices of Chance M. McGhee, we understand how emotional it can be to even think about losing your home. Our experienced Schertz bankruptcy lawyers can help you determine if bankruptcy is a viable option for you and what kind of bankruptcy you should file. Call the office today at 210-342-3400 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/a/automaticstay.asp

https://money.cnn.com/2010/07/21/real_estate/bankruptcy_and_foreclosure/index.htm

Filing Bankruptcy in 2019 to Write Off More Income Taxes

January 7th, 2019 at 8:00 am

With smart timing you can discharge—legally and permanently write off—more income tax debts, even with a standard Chapter 7 case. 

 

The right timing of the filing of a bankruptcy case can make a tremendous difference. Our last 8 blog posts have all been about smart timing. If you need to use the bankruptcy laws to get relief from your creditors, it’s only sensible to get as much relief as the laws can give you by timing it right.

The discharge of income tax debts is particularly timing sensitive.

How Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Conquer Income Tax Debts

Filing bankruptcy with smart timing in 2019 conquers your income tax debts in two main ways:

  • Discharge (legally write off) more of your tax debts (likely for the 2015 tax year). This applies to both Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” and Chapter 13 “adjustment of debts.”
  • Include any taxes owed for the 2018 tax year in your Chapter 13 payment plan. This gives you huge advantages.

Today we’ll show the first part—how to discharge more income taxes in 2019 with a Chapter 7 case. We’ll cover the Chapter 13 aspects in the next two weeks.

Is Chapter 7 “Straight Bankruptcy” Good Enough?

You may be surprised that income tax debts can be discharged under Chapter 7 just like most other debts. They are discharged just as completely as a medical bill or credit card balance. You just need to time it right. You do also need to meet some other conditions. But much of the time those other conditions are met rather easily.

What’s the easiest way to deal with a tax debt?  You may have heard that the more complicated Chapter 13 is better if you owe income taxes. That’s often true, especially if you owe for multiple years and/or for more recent tax years.

However, under the following circumstances Chapter 7 is likely better:

  • All of the income taxes you owe qualify for discharge
  • Some but not all of your income taxes qualify for discharge, but you can handle the rest either through:

The main advantage with Chapter 7 is speed. An income tax that qualifies will be forever discharged. This will usually happen about 4 months after you file your Chapter 7 case. Your whole case will, in most situations, be fully completed at that point. You can get on with your life. In contrast, a Chapter 13 case usually takes at least 3 years and can stretch as long as 5.

Discharge More Income Tax under Chapter 7

There are two main timing conditions for discharging income taxes through Chapter 7. The day that your bankruptcy lawyer files the case must be both:

1) at least 3 years past when the applicable tax return was due, adding any time for extensions to submit the return (Section 507(a)(8)(A)(i) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.)

2) at least 2 years past when the tax return was actually submitted to the IRS or state tax agency (Section 523(a)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code.)

Again, there are other conditions. Some involve timing, such as additional time added if you’ve made an offer in compromise on that tax, or filed a prior bankruptcy. (Section 507(a)(8)(A)(ii).) The other main condition is if you “made a fraudulent return or willfully attempted in any manner to evade or defeat such tax.” (Section 523(a)(1)(C).) A recorded tax lien on the tax would add some additional complications. But these additional conditions often don’t apply. If you ARE concerned that any might apply to you, tell your lawyer early in your first meeting.

Applied to Income Tax Owed for 2015

Let’s apply this to a tax debt for the 2015 tax year.

If you owe income taxes for 2015, when would you meet the first of the two main timing conditions? The 2015 tax return was due April 15, 2016. So you need to file your Chapter 7 case 3 years after that, after April 15, 2019. So then the required 3 years will have passed since that tax return was due.

This assumes you didn’t get a tax return filing extension. What happens if you did? That year the standard extension to October 15, 2016 fell on a Saturday. So the extended deadline would have actually been Monday, October 17, 2016. (As you can see, these kinds of minor-seeming details can be crucial.)  So if you got this extension you’d have to file your Chapter 7 case after October 17, 2019.

How about the second of the above two conditions? When did you submit your 2015 tax return(s) to the IRS/state? You have to make sure at least 2 years have passed since you’d submitted it/them. If submitted by either the regular due date of April 15, 2016 or the extended date of October 17, 2016, then you’ve already met this 2-year condition (as of the writing of this blog post). If you submitted the return(s) any later, you have to make sure that you meet this 2-year condition.

An Example

Assume that you:

  • owed $7,000 to the IRS for 2015 income taxes
  • submitted that tax return to the IRS on or before April 15, 2016 without an extension
  • did not pursue an Offer in Compromise or file an interim bankruptcy case, or if you did the resulting additional time has passed
  • the tax return was not fraudulent and you didn’t “willfully attempt” “to evade or defeat” the tax

If you now file a Chapter 7 case after April 15, 2019, this $7,000 tax debt would almost certainly be completely discharged within 4 months of filing. If you file before then this tax debt would not be discharged. See a competent bankruptcy lawyer as soon as possible to determine what’s best for you regardless.

 

Disadvantages of a Badly-Timed 5-Year Chapter 13 Case

December 31st, 2018 at 8:00 am

Following up on last week’s scenario, here are the financial, credit record, and other disadvantages of a forced 5-year Chapter 13 plan.   

 

Our last two blog posts were about how the last 6 calendar months of income of a person filing a Chapter 13 case can determine whether his or her Chapter 13 payment plan lasts only 3 years or instead a full 5 years. We showed how even relatively small shifts in income can cause this huge difference.

The last blog post gave a scenario illustrating how this would work in a real-life situation. It showed how under certain circumstances one person would have a 3-year payment plan if he or she filed a Chapter 13 case in January but a 5-year plan if filed in February.  Today we look at the financial and other consequences of this difference, and some other practical considerations.

Filing a Chapter 13 Case in January vs. February 2019

Our scenario involved a person receiving an extra $2,500 in income in January 2019 from a temporary holiday job. (That’s in addition to the $3,000 every month from the person’s regular job.) Because of the way income is calculated, that $2,500 would push this person over the median family income threshold, but only IF that income is counted. Filing the Chapter 13 case in January would result in that extra $2,500 NOT being counted. That’s because you count only the last 6 FULL CALENDAR MONTHS’ income (and double that for the annual amount). Those 6 months with a January filing are July through December 2018. You DON’T count the income of the month you’re filing the case—in this situation, January.

When filing the Chapter 13 case in February you DO COUNT the extra $2,500 in determining the plan’s length. That’s because the last 6 full calendar months are then August 2018 through January 2019, including the $2,500.

Financial Consequences

Our scenario assumed that your budget requires you to pay $300 per month into your Chapter 13 plan. If you have to pay that for 5 years instead of 3, that’s 2 more years of payments. 24 months of $300 payments totals $7,200. That’s a lot of extra money to pay just because you happened to file your Chapter 13 case in February instead of January.

That could potentially include filing the case just one day later—February 1 instead of January 31. Again, that’s because when filing on February 1 you must include January’s income—including the extra $2,500. When filing on January 31 you don’t include January’s income, avoiding that very troublesome $2,500.

Of course if your monthly Chapter 13 plan payment would be larger than $300, the extra money you pay will be that much more. For example, a $500 monthly plan payment would mean an extra $6,000 paid during the extra two years.

In addition, the longer your case lasts the more likely that your income would increase during your case. That may well require you to increase your monthly plan payment. That would result in you paying that much more during the final two years.

For example, assume you’re paying $500 per month into your payment plan from the beginning of your case. After 3 years you get a new job or a promotion increasing your income by $300 per month. If you had a 3-year plan (based on your initial income calculation) you’d be finishing your Chapter 13 case then. You’d pay nothing more into the payment plan; you’d get to keep all your income, including the pay increase.

Instead, if you’re in a 5-year plan you’d have two more years to go. You may well have to increase your $500 plan payments by $300 to $800 monthly. $800 per month for the final two years would mean an additional $19,200 paid to your creditors. And this could happen merely by filing your case with unwise timing!

Credit Record Consequences

These financial consequences of a longer case are bad enough. But the intangible consequences could be pretty bad as well.

Having your case last 2 years longer means 2 more years before you can really rebuild your credit. To some extent you may be able to build some positive credit history DURING a Chapter 13 case. That can happen if as part of the case you’re making regular contractual payments on your home or vehicle. But you’re still in the midst of a bankruptcy case, which harms your credit record. The sooner you complete your Chapter 13 case the better for credit purposes.

Two extra years in your case means that much longer before you’re free of the Chapter 13 trustee’s supervision. That likely means two more years that the trustee can take your income tax refunds to benefit your creditors. And, as described above, that’s two more years that increases in income could go, partly or fully, to your creditors.

Also, it’s 2 more years of the risk that you won’t finish your case successfully. To get some of the most important benefits of a Chapter 13 case you must complete it.  The longer a case lasts the more opportunities for things to happen that jeopardize a successful completion.

Lastly, being in a Chapter 13 case can be emotionally challenging. You wouldn’t be in it unless it was providing you significant financial benefits. (For example, saving your home and/or your vehicle(s), paying your income taxes or child support while protected from these creditors.) But you are in a sort of financial limbo. It feels very good to finish it and get it over with. You definitely want to do so in 3 years instead of 5 if you can.

 “Three-Year Plans” that Last Longer

One last thing: a Chapter 13 plan that is allowed to be finished in 3 years may last longer. Your income may allow you to have a 3-year plan but you can chose to have it last longer. The law provides that the bankruptcy “court, for cause,” may approve a length up to 5 years.

Many things that could push your allowed-to-be-3-year plan to be longer. You may want to pay for something—a home mortgage arrearage or priority income taxes, for example—and need more time to do so within a reasonable budget. So your plan may last up to 5 years in order for it to accomplish what you need it to.

IF this applies to you, being required to pay for 5 years because of your income may not be a practical disadvantage. On the other hand, you certainly don’t want to stumble into a 5-year Chapter 13 case simply because you didn’t time it well.

Talk with an experienced and conscientious bankruptcy lawyer to learn where your own unique circumstances puts you in all this.

 

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